The most amazing lies

European integration was always a project created by the people, for the people.

There’s not been a more elitist political project anywhere, anywhen. Tsarist Russia was positively populist by contrast.

But that’s Jean-Claude for you, getting the big lie in first.

31 comments on “The most amazing lies

  1. In other lies, the BBC news site reports this morning that ‘Obamacare’ is now even more popular than ever.

  2. He is right – in the sense that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea is 1. Democratic and 2. popular.

    The EU is one of those very good ideas that took utter genius to screw up. This should go into the textbooks as an example of what an intellectually bankrupt failed ruling elite looks like.

  3. It would be interesting to hear him enlarge on the mechanics of exactly how that happened.

    Well, no it wouldn’t, but a good start might be: “In the beginning, the people placed in power some unelected dictators…”

  4. terrorism and organised crime […] do not stop at national borders, so without collective policymaking there can be no effective policy

    And the collective policy?

    Schengen.

    That really hasn’t been a resounding improvement.

  5. — ‘European integration was always a project created by the people, for the people.’

    Truly, The Guardian has become Pravda.

    The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.

  6. Indeed–let any dross in and then attack white people for daring to speak out when rape, murder and terrorism are shoved in front of our faces.

    The Brexit negotiations should really include the public hanging of Druncker as a major term.

  7. The Tsars were the spiritual fathers of their people who were in essence his wider family. The EU is a cash and carry outfit with a media sales pitch for suckers.

  8. “terrorism and organised crime […] do not stop at national borders, so without collective policymaking there can be no effective policy”

    Obviously, collective policymaking is not necessary for effective policy. But if it were, that would be an argument for world government.

  9. The people: “we don’t want another world war”

    The leaders: “We’re listening, here’s a new law on the curve of bananas”

  10. Theo: Obviously, collective policymaking is not necessary for effective policy.

    Well quite. And UK policy will become rather more effective when no longer hamstrung by the constraint of collective policy-making.

    It’s for this reason that one can be entirely certain that a European army would never leave barracks for want of agreement by 27 defence ministers and 54 marshalls and admirals bedizened with braid, ribbons and sashes.

  11. RE: Collective policymaking. Effective policy can simply be ‘Police the crimes in your own country, consider extraditions relating to crimes in other countries where the suspect is in yours.’

    You can only have effective policies where there is the authority to enforce them. All these weasel words and hand waving are meant to disguise EU nationalism.

  12. In not completely unrelated news, UKIP’s only MP has resigned from the party to sit as an independent. And Arron Banks has already departed. Without Farage at the helm, UKIP is an uncontrollable and self-destructive rabble.

  13. It’s all yadda yadda Eurobollocks. But this bit:

    For 60 years Europe achieved the seemingly unachievable: a stay in the everlasting European tragedy of war and peace.

    Leaving aside the habitual Eurocrat dishonesty in taking credit for Germany not starting WW3, is the Long Peace worth it?

    It’s certainly not sustainable. We’re already deep into a low-intensity fourth generation war started by the Mohammedans our political elites thought it’d be a good idea to invite here.

    Demographics guarantee it’s only going to get more bloody and vicious from here on out, till the natives die off, submit to Islam or opt for the Charles Martel solution.

    War isn’t the worst thing that can happen to a nation. Extinction is.

    Yet where has the Long Peace taken us? European birthrates are at suicidally low levels. In this country alone we kill a small city’s worth of healthy unborn babies every year. Our population outlook was healthier while the Luftwaffe was bombing us. And Germany is now a nation of cuckolds. Sweden is worse.

    In 2017 you have the freedom to stick whatever you want up your arse, but you’ll get jailed for the wrong Tweet. We’re ruled by a class of passive aggressive primary school teachers who think it’s their job to control our opinions, our carbon footprints, and even our diets.

    The arts are dead, an obscurantist circle jerk frozen in crusty rigor mortis. The churches are a sad joke. Our seats of learning dispense expensively-attained ignorance. Where is the sense of heroism, of splendour, of striving towards something greater, as the Victorians did? Where’s the adventure?

    Maybe Carl Douglas was wrong and Cormac McCarthy was right. Maybe we should give war a chance:

    It makes no difference what men think of war, said the judge. War endures. As well ask men what they think of stone. War was always here. Before man was, war waited for him. The ultimate trade awaiting its ultimate practitioner. That is the way it was and will be. That way and not some other way.

    I’m not saying we should hang Parliament, nuke Stockholm and reconquer Brittany. But it’s worth a thought.

  14. The People were hardly likely to create a European project shortly after WWII: many of them probably felt they’d seen quite enough of fascism, thank you very much.

  15. For 60 years Europe achieved the seemingly unachievable: a stay in the everlasting European tragedy of war and peace.

    Jesus wept!

    Japan up to 1945 had been at more or less continuous war for five decades. It annexed Taiwan, took on Russia, annexed Korea and Manchuria and then tried to swallow China. Europe’s militarism was utterly dwarfed by Japan’s.

    Yet that has stopped now, and Japan is as peaceful as anywhere can be. Nor has anyone else much been fighting in Asia since the Americans left Vietnam.

    All without anything resembling the EU.

    So forgive me if I don’t think the EU should take credit for the change in European habits of inveterate warfare.

  16. Theo,

    “In not completely unrelated news, UKIP’s only MP has resigned from the party to sit as an independent. And Arron Banks has already departed. Without Farage at the helm, UKIP is an uncontrollable and self-destructive rabble.”

    In my LPUK days I got to know a former UKIP member* quite well. He said that at meetings nobody was interested in anything other the leaving the EU. If he tried to discuss other policies he was ignored until someone said the magic words “leave the EU” and the meeting sprung to life.

    It looks like now we’re out the have nowhere élevé to and are being turned in to BNP lite.

    *I think he’s occasional commenter here Andrew WS and if it is perhaps he could tell me if my memory is still holding up?

  17. @BiND
    I know someone who’s close (including on a friendship basis) to both Farage & Nutall & I’ve been asking him since well before the referendum where the party should go to on a positive outcome. Never got a straight answer.
    “Wait & see. All will be revealed”
    I’d take that as nobody had or has a clue. I’m told they intend to capture a lot of disgruntled Labour voters. My question’s been “To what purpose? Or is that an aim in itself?”
    It’s classic Parkinson, isn’t it? The organisation no longer serves a purpose but it is now more important than the purpose it served. So it thrashes around looking for another one.
    “and are being turned in to BNP lite. ”
    What exactly wrong with that? Like any party, the BNP had some decent people in it. Sick of unlimited immigration & forced multiculturalism before it was fashionable to be so, with nowhere else to go. Without the BNP’s dubious characters it’s an entirely legitimate political position to espouse. Plenty of other nationalist parties in Europe.

  18. Incidentally, regarding that “created by the people, for the people” bullshit. Wasn’t it Monet who said that if people had known what they were plotting they’d never have got away with creating the thing?

  19. “Wasn’t it Monet who said that if people had known what they were plotting they’d never have got away with creating the thing?”

    Nah, people like those giant washed-out pictures of waterlilies at Giverny. You may be thinking of Jean Monnet.

  20. “Maybe we should give war a chance”

    No, Steve. I agree with you up that statement. But “War is the health of the state”, as Hegel said; and I’d prefer a minimal state – at least 40% smaller than we have.

    As for the RoPers, offer them each £10,000 to renounce their UK citizenship and to leave the UK for the muslim state of their choice where they can claim asylum. It would be cheap at the price.

  21. We are ruled by a class of passive aggressive primary school teachers

    I put a hat on just so I could take it off in acknowledgement of this sally. Bravo.

    Should be a Samizdata QOTD if there ever was one.

  22. For a party with (at most) two MPs and a tendency to fracture every four days UKIP has achieved quite a lot. Won the biggest British political battle of the past forty years, in fact.

  23. “…UKIP has achieved quite a lot.”

    Farage achieved a huge amount, UKIP very little.

  24. All very nice Theo–but your crew are a shower of BluLabour Remain cucks.

    Who– as Dress -Up May showed in her pathetic post-attack speech– also fawn over imported takeover cults.

    Got any –viable–plans to deselect all the Remain scum then? And get a HoC NOT full of London Bubble BluLabour CM cucks?

    Because otherwise you are paying dues to a shower making matters worse not better.

  25. European integration was always a project created by the people, for the people.

    Ah, but which people? “The people” could mean just about any group.

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