Fun thought

Scotland could become part of Canada if its citizens were to vote for independence, according to a Canadian author.
Ken McGoogan, whose works include How the Scots Invented Canada, said that geographical boundaries could be irrelevant thanks to modern technology, so Scotland should find its new home with Canadian colleagues.

So it’s irrelevant that Britain is leaving that geographic polity called the European Union then….

24 comments on “Fun thought

  1. A letter to the this week’s Economist :

    There is a simple solution to the Brexit conundrum, one that will allow Britain to have its trade cake and eat it too: the UK need only become the 11th province of Canada. Canada and the EU recently concluded a trade agreement and the UK would accede to it as a Canadian province. It would also join NAFTA and enjoy liberal trade terms with the United States.

    Adjustments would be few and easy. Canada’s provinces have wide powers and by treaty the UK’s could be even broader. The queen would remain head of state. As a provincial flag, the Union flag would still be flown, with the Canadian flag a discreet presence on government buildings. As Hong Kong and Macau kept the dollar and pataca, so Britain could keep the pound. English would be an official language (though so would French). Such a move wouldn’t be unprecedented. Newfoundland left the UK and joined Canada in 1949. Time to think outside the box.

  2. Or a really wild idea – that the fifth largest economy in the world becomes an independent nation once again.

    It might work.

  3. @TimN – population of Canada is about half that of the UK – by sheer weight of votes I’m not sure the incompetent Son-of-Castro would survive long

  4. I always ask anti-Brexit Canadians why they haven’t joined the US and none of them have been able to answer satisfactorily

  5. John, I have asked the same of anti Brexit Kiwis on joining Australia. Wouldn’t being run from Canberra be just great?

  6. Not really relevant to this but in matters of North America and Scotland, I was surprised to hear on Radio 4 that Johnny Cash was of Scottish heritage and had family connections to Malcolm, King of Scotland

  7. No chance of Jockland or UK joining Canada. That would mean all of our official stuff becoming bi(tri)lingual with French!

  8. LPT – “Because he is so much worse than May?”

    As a loyal Daily Mail reader I have to admit, reluctantly, that he has better legs.

  9. Newfoundland was never part of the UK. Until 1907 it was an overseas territory, exactly the same position as Falkland, Gibraltar, etc., until 1949 it was a dominion, exactly the same as Canada itself, and Australia and New Zealand, though with no local government from 1935, just like Pitcain and BIOT.

  10. ‘Scotland could become part of Canada if its citizens were to vote for independence, according to a Canadian author.’

    ‘Part of Canada’ and ‘independence’ don’t seem to go together. Is that a Canadian author thing?

  11. Isn’t the answer for all those pro-EU Scottish Independence types for Scotland to leave the UK and become part of Ireland?

  12. I am a Canadian voter and the only part of you lot we might want is England.

    We and the Americans, Aussies et al. long ago took all the good Scots leaving you with the dregs, which is why Scotland is presently a moribund left-hole. Brain-drain.

    But we still need to figure out how to get rid of the money sucking Quebecois.

  13. Fred

    I work in Edinburgh with a couple of Canadians who are, how should I put this, a bit dim.

  14. Both Canada and Australia would do better under UK rule.

    We would have to get our own anti-left act in order but the UK and two giant landmasses have the resources to form a super-power more than equal to the USA/ China etc–let alone the Euro-losers.

  15. ‘Scotland could become part of Canada if its citizens were to vote for independence’

    Scots, DON’T LIMIT YOURSELVES! YOU COULD BECOME PART OF URUGUAY!

    Or Vietnam! There are hundreds of possibilities! Canada isn’t in the top 10.

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