This is a good one

The NAACP report asserts that humans have a right to safe, affordable, sustainable power. Public utilities — regulated monopolies — are charged with serving the public interest, and the report argues they should ensure access to electricity for all people.

Yep, ‘leccie is a human right now. They also argue for:

Notably, the report also calls for more clean power and distributed generation. Rooftop solar offers one tool for protecting the right to electricity.

Intermittent power production so that more people can be denied their human right more often.

38 comments on “This is a good one

  1. Flatcap A, please explain how affordable combines with sustainable. Or is it affordable in the sense that someone else pays?

  2. A Maryland man resorted to using an electric generator to power his home after losing service from the grid. Carbon monoxide from the generator killed him and his seven children in their sleep.

    He could afford to obtain and run a generator, but couldn’t pay his leccy bills? Wat?

    A mother in New York used a candle to light her home after the utility disconnected her power. Authorities say the candle likely started the fire that killed three of her children.

    Sad! But:

    Jennifer McCusker, 41, was killed in the fire at 16 Hollywood Dr. in Shirley, Long Island, along with son Aidan Tarbell, 7, and twins Ava Jane Mistretta and Brendan Mistretta, both 2. The fire broke out around 10 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 11.

    She was a single mum with five kids by different men. Cheaper to tie her tubes than for taxpayers to keep giving her free shit for dropping her knickers.

    A Michigan man died of hypothermia after a power shutoff left him without heat. He had failed to settle his power bill. Authorities later found the bill in his kitchen alongside a large sum of money, suggesting the man intended to pay the utility.

    If you read the report, it was the municipal power company, owned by the curajus state, that cut him off.

    According to data from the Energy Information Administration, among households at or below 150 percent of the poverty level, those headed by African-Americans were more than twice as likely to endure power shutoffs as those headed by white Americans. The report said this disparity could be the result of institutional racism or differences in wealth, among other factors.

    Other factors including being irresponsible with bills.

    “In New York State, we have some of the highest electricity costs in the nation, and we need more low-income customers and communities of color represented on the Public Service Commission and involved in energy policy decision-making and regulation.”

    Get more lazy people, losers, and effnik grievance merchants involved in setting policy for technologies that might as well be magic for all they understand.

    Sounds like a plan.

  3. @ Alex
    Only for the poor – when I was relatively well-off and living in a smallish flat that I could keep clean (hygenic but untidy) in the few hours betwen working and sleeping (it’s now priced @ c.£1m, twice my current family house) I didn’t have a rooftop.

  4. @Alex – I was told the story a while ago about a large data centre in London run by a large oil company, which was pushing solar at the time. One day the grizzled old centre manager receives a phone call from a Bright Young Thing bursting with enthusiasm:

    BYT: Hello! We have a commitment to run as much of the company as we can on renewable energy! How much power do you consume there?
    GOCM: About a megawatt to run all the servers plus maybe half a megawatt to a megawatt to run the cooling on a warm day
    BYT: That’s GREAT. And how much space do you have to put in solar panels?
    GOCM: *covers phone mouthpiece with hand and shouts to sidekick* OI! Barry! How big is that balcony outside?

    *click*

  5. @ Witchie
    Coal-fired is affordable and sustainable as there is more coal than we want to burn so the price goes down to balance with demand or marginal cost of production, whichever is the higher – when I visted Sakha the locals told me that they stopped counting their coal reserves when they got to a bit over one trillion tons (one million tons per inhabitant).

  6. When I was at school in the early 1980s in Chemistry we examined UK energy resources. The main thing I remember is that the UK had 300+ years of coal at 1980’s usage levels, but that most of it is more than 1km underground and conseqeuently not economic to dig it up with humans until machines and market prices of alternatives makes it worth while. Most of Lincolnshire and the East Riding is above huge coal fields more than 1km underground.

  7. “Most of Lincolnshire and the East Riding is above huge coal fields more than 1km underground”

    OT but this is the kind of thing which blows my mind a bit. The sheer time it took to create that coal and everything that came after it is amazing. (I know it’s well known but still.)

  8. Rooftop “power” would produce a blizzard of poor chumps falling to their deaths while trying to service and repair the panels.

    Eco–cockrot that doesn’t even try to hide its Marxist roots in Hell.

  9. Amy Mays, the woman described at the beginning of this article, found stability in solar. After she was disconnected from the grid, she started reading up on rooftop solar. She bought panels one or two at a time, as she could afford them. Eventually, she had purchased enough to provide a generous supply of power to her home.

    “With life-threatening, high-heat temperatures in Arizona, solar has literally saved my life!”

    Solar seems like a reasonable way of powering your air-conditioner in sunny Arizona. Whether it should be subsidised is quite another matter – Ms Mays seems to have coped perfectly well without help.

    A Michigan man died of hypothermia after a power shutoff left him without heat.

    Conversely, solar isn’t much use for people living in the cold north; even though Detroit is at the same latitude as Rome.

  10. Spot on Mr Ecks. (I wanted to say it, cos I don’t get to say it very often!)

    Working at height is dangerous. I mean, everyone know that, but you look at the figures and even having accounted for the fact you knew it was dangerous, you’ll still find it’s surprisingly dangerous.

    I’m not saying solar panels are A Bad Thing, exactly, but sob stories about unfortunate premature deaths are an atrocious justification for more solar panels and wind turbines.

  11. This idea about nuclear – its dead expensive to build and run a plant. Yet the various militaries around the world seem to run nuclear plants in subs and ships for a much smaller figure. Are the economies of scale that much different? Are safety standards different in the navy?

  12. Submarine safety standards are slightly different – based on the fact that if you are all going to die because you reach crush depth, a wee bit of less gold-playing on the nuclear safety procedures might be justified. But you run to the same civilian standards within (I forget) miles of land.

    But subs are very expensive, as are nuclear powered aircraft carriers.

  13. Oh, and we have quite a few dead subs knocking around waiting for the politicians to decide on the long-term waste repository.

    Storming, anyone?

    Yes, and gold- plating, not playing.

  14. — “The NAACP report asserts that humans have a right to safe, affordable, sustainable power. ”

    Translation: “The NAACP advocates slavery.”

  15. “Yep, ‘leccie is a human right now.”

    Er, yes, that’s how human rights work. They didn’t exist in nature, then we decided they should and created them. Access to as much competitively priced electricity as you want to buy could quite reasonably be added to the list these days.

    “Rooftop solar offers one tool for protecting the right to electricity.”

    You have completely misunderstood their point. Rooftop solar is not efficient in terms of generating power. It’s an excellent way of removing the government’s ability to switch you off, though. The NAACP sees the same crypto-far-right trend I do, and is acting on behalf of its supporters in trying to make it harder for the Nazis if they do get into power – don’t forget, we only narrowly avoided having a crypto-Nazi in the White House at the last US election.

  16. The Nazi government can’t switch off your airccon if you have solar; but they’ll find it easy to cut your water supply, and you won’t last a week without drinking water.

  17. Martin – “Are the economies of scale that much different? Are safety standards different in the navy?”

    Because nuclear power is so expensive, it is very susceptible to delays and to changes in interest rates. The Greens have clued on to this and responded by delaying every single power station as long as possible. So each reactor has to get a new safety approval. It doesn’t matter if 100 PWRs have been built already, they need the full range of public hearings with full-on panic-mode bullsh!t each and every time. Then they sue. All this costs.

    Nuclear submarines do not have the same problem. The reactor type has approval. It is built. It is launched. Delays are rare.

    Surreptitious Evil – “Submarine safety standards are slightly different”

    And of course BAe makes them even less stringent by cheating. Sub-standard (if you will forgive the expression) parts makes for cheaper builds, but not safer submarines.

  18. If it’s true that we have a right to affordable power, is it significant that no word suggests power when we need it, can we claim damages from Trougher Yeo, Fuckwit Deben and Co?

  19. Dave – “Access to as much competitively priced electricity as you want to buy could quite reasonably be added to the list these days.”

    First of all, f**k off Dave. Second of all, that is not what they are arguing for. In those cases cited, it is either stated or implied that Black people simply did not pay their bills. They got cut off. The NAACP is arguing that being cut off for not paying your bill is a violation of human rights.

    “It’s an excellent way of removing the government’s ability to switch you off, though.”

    No it isn’t. Solar panels usually come with a smart metre. Connecting to the grid is complex so you need a chip or two to manage it. Which means they can cut you off any time they like.

    “The NAACP sees the same crypto-far-right trend I do, and is acting on behalf of its supporters in trying to make it harder for the Nazis if they do get into power”

    The level of delusion here is impressive.

  20. “Rooftop solar is not efficient in terms of generating power. It’s an excellent way of removing the government’s ability to switch you off, though”

    Where I live it is now dark and solar panels are delivering nothing. The lights that charged during the solar day have long since died. Without nuclear or fossil fuels, at 40 degrees North you depend on the morons who decide energy policy

  21. Re: Martin’s question on using naval nuclear reactors for civilian power.

    Rolls-Royce have some
    interesting plans

    On the face of it, it’s not a bad idea. Tho as SMFS said, the problem with nuclear is man-made. The ecoloons don’t want us having affordable, reliable, clean energy. Everything they advocate – from windfarm fetishism to fissionphobia to carbon extortion – is designed to retard our living standards and eventually roll back industrial civilisation.

    If green policies were rational, we wouldn’t be in the absurd position of importing millions of tonnes of American wood pellets to burn for fuel in place of coal.

    They ultimately want us to be washing our handmade nettlefibre pants in the local river before jumping on a wicker tandem bicycle to go home and eat uncooked leeks in some miserable dung hut lit with candles made out of locally-sourced dogs’ ear wax.

    Environmentalism is a cult, like all the worst cults as dangerous as it is goofy, and the only sane and proportionate response is to load them all on helicopters and dump them in the lavanating maw of an active volcano.

  22. Ben Shaprio has a good take on these ‘rights’, any right that creates an obligation from a doctor, or a builder, or a power plant, can only exist when enforced at the barrel of a gun.

    It can only lead to one destination.

  23. Steve:

    Do you have any idea how long it takes to fill out the environmental impact statement for polluting a pristine volcanic environment with idiots?

  24. “Er, yes, that’s how human rights work. They didn’t exist in nature, then we decided they should and created them. Access to as much competitively priced electricity as you want to buy could quite reasonably be added to the list these days.”

    Providing good and services at the expense of others is not how human rights work. That’s how socialism works. Sorry.

  25. SMFS>

    “The NAACP is arguing that being cut off for not paying your bill is a violation of human rights.”

    That makes it much more interesting, because of course that’s precisely how we treat water bills in this country. Are we at the stage of development where electricity can be considered as vital as water? Seems a reasonable proposition to me; if we’re not there now we will be shortly.

    tomsmith>

    You can call them what you like, but those are human rights you’re talking about. None of them arise naturally, they are all things we’ve decided to grant each other. The right to free speech, for example, is only a ‘right’ if someone stops me punching you in the mouth every time you talk.

  26. @Dave. Like most SJWs, you are completely ignorant on the subject of human rights. They are there to protect individual citizens from the power of the state. You not punching me is not a human right. It is being subject to laws agreed upon to enable us to live together without killing each other. If those laws did not exist, I would take steps to ensure that you did not punch me, steps which you would not like. Where all of you totalitarians go wrong is in insisting that you can steal from me to pay your pals. You can steal from me to pay mutually agreed and necessary costs, so that we may be good neighbours. These costs do not include providing you or your pals with any freebies, including electricity. Read Dicey on rights, not your dumb Marxist buddies.

  27. The Inimitable Steve – “The ecoloons don’t want us having affordable, reliable, clean energy.”

    Toshiba is in big trouble in large part because of two nuclear reactor projects in Georgia and South Carolina. Everything was going well until 2009 – when a lot of red tape delays and bureaucratic obstructions slowed everything down.

    I wonder what could have happened in 2008 to cause that?

  28. Dave – “That makes it much more interesting, because of course that’s precisely how we treat water bills in this country.”

    People get cut off for not paying their water bills.

    “Seems a reasonable proposition to me; if we’re not there now we will be shortly.”

    So electricity should be free? An interesting proposition. I like the idea of a country where you can go to jail for not paying for your TV but you don’t even get cut off for not paying for its electricity.

    “None of them arise naturally, they are all things we’ve decided to grant each other. The right to free speech, for example, is only a ‘right’ if someone stops me punching you in the mouth every time you talk.”

    Well no. Remember the law is there to protect the criminal. So by all means, you punch anyone you like in the mouth. They will have a gun. Pretty soon people will be free to say what they like. Free speech is a natural right and armed societies might be polite societies but they are also societies where freaks and other SJWs do not interrupt other people’s speeches.

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