Err, yes, quite obviously

In a paper titled “More Than a Physical Burden: Women’s Mental and Emotional Work in Preventing Pregnancy,” sociologist Katrina Kimport — who works as an associate professor at the Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health at the University of California, San Francisco — documented the way that women are tasked with the majority of physical work required to prevent pregnancy and also expected to do most of the emotional and mental labor as well.

“While the biotechnological landscape of available methods may explain the assignment of the physical burden for contraception to women,” Kimport wrote, “this does not mean the concomitant time, attention, and stress that preventing pregnancy requires must also be primarily assumed by women.”

But when it comes to the American health care system, Kimport found, there’s a widespread assumption that dealing with contraception is women’s work, and men are often shut out of the conversation. Kimport went to six family planning clinics in the San Francisco Bay Area and recorded conversations with 52 women, who all wanted to not have more children.

Women get pregnant, men don’t. Who would we expect to carry that burden of contraception then?

32 comments on “Err, yes, quite obviously

  1. I disagree with the premise – I’ve never met a woman who could apply a condom properly. So how they bear the physical and emotional burden of something the man has to do is beyond me :p

  2. the amount of extra work women do — when you count paid and unpaid work like housework and child care — adds up to 39 days a year more than men.

    Does this include time spent facebooking at work, forming cliques, going on the sick, buggering off at 5 on the dot every day, and complaining? Because if so 39 days is a lowball estimate.

    Women, a new study published in the Journal of Sex Research has shown, are expected to do the majority (and often all) the work required so that heterosexual couples can have sex without making babies.

    The obvious solution is to have babies before your womb dries up and you become a bitter, lonely old hag like Amanda Marcotte.

    “While the biotechnological landscape of available methods may explain the assignment of the physical burden for contraception to women,” Kimport wrote, “this does not mean the concomitant time, attention, and stress that preventing pregnancy requires must also be primarily assumed by women.”

    BUT WHO THEN WILL DO THE IMPORTANT WORK OF COMPLAINING?

    as her research shows, there’s a hefty amount of mental and emotional work that goes into pregnancy prevention. Women have to stay on top of doctor visits and pharmacy visits and, in many cases, also have the daily task of remembering to take birth control pills.

    Yes, going to GP appointments that you arranged and remembering to take your pills is “mental and emotional work”, bigots. Stop laughing.

    Kimport saw reason to be optimistic about men regularly sharing their opinions on a contraception method’s impact on sexual pleasure.

    I can think of few more effective prophylactics than some goblin-faced feminist demanding a critical theory-riddled conversation about sexual pleasure.

    She also suggested that doctors could be more open to the possibility of sterilization, for both men and women, especially as vasectomy is a great way for men to share the contraception burden.

    “Lol why not just sterilise yourself?” they say, as if permanently destroying your reproductive capability was like getting a new hat.

    Aldous Huxley and JPII were right.

    This is a culture of death, which has severed sex from its connection to love and life, and turned it into just another pointless and grubby form of masturbation.

    No wonder progressives are so obsessed with sex “toys”. It’s all just sterile, mechanical grinding to them. Like a tale told by a feminist, it is full of sound and “poor me!”, but signifying nothing.

  3. bilbaoboy – I know, right? Lazy-eyed, horse-featured feminist she-Morlocks telling me I’m doing sex wrong get my goat more reliably than Mr Ecks in a meeting of spartacist shepherds.

    Of course, men are – always and everywhere -doing everything wrong, according to feminism. As a man, nothing you can do will ever please feminists, so the only sane, rational and fair response is to accuse them of being witches and push them in the local canal.

  4. Whoever doesn’t want kids bears the burden. If he doesn’t and is worried that she might forget (“accidentally” or otherwise), then he takes the pills.

  5. Steve

    Yes. We are constantly submitted to metaphorical golden showers.

    I’m not surprised that suicide rates for young males are rising.

    You can’t even blow a raspberry these days without somebody calling you out

  6. Kimport went to six family planning clinics in the San Francisco Bay Area and recorded conversations with 52 women, who all wanted to not have more children.

    She interviewed a bunch of women who did not want children and oddly enough most of the work of not having children rested with them. Did she talk to their partners? Did they even know that their women didn’t want children?

    What everyone else says – whoever has the most to lose is going to be the one who does the most to avoid it. But more to the point, this is meaningless unless it is actually a statistically representative sample.

  7. “While the biotechnological landscape of available methods may explain the assignment of the physical burden for contraception to women,” Kimport wrote, “this does not mean the concomitant time, attention, and stress that preventing pregnancy requires must also be primarily assumed by women.”

    Translation: I’m not so batshit crazy as not realise that the vast majority of contraceptive methods are practically related to female bodies, but I am batshit crazy enough to try and make out that somehow despite that fact men should be doing more.

  8. @KevinA – I’m not aware of any pill a man can take?? the only options for male based contraception are either condoms or vasectomy… Are there new male led options i’m not aware of?

  9. documented the way that women are tasked with the majority of physical work required to prevent pregnancy

    Like putting on condoms with their mouths?

  10. Did she talk to their partners?

    You’re assuming they had any. How many of these women were riding the cock-carousel, as Roissy so eloquently puts it?

  11. Of course if men were shouldering a majority of the various burdens of preventing pregnancy, Ms. Katrina Kimport would be first in line to denounce The Patriarchy for keeping pregnancy prevention out of the hands of women in an attempt to reduce all women to a state of abject helplessness.

  12. Abstinence? She isn’t talking about third world societies where wives are basically raped by their husbands; she’s talking about San Francisco.

  13. Of course if men were shouldering a majority of the various burdens of preventing pregnancy, Ms. Katrina Kimport would be first in line to denounce The Patriarchy for keeping pregnancy prevention out of the hands of women in an attempt to reduce all women to a state of abject helplessness.

    Yep. The game is rigged so a man can never win it, so bother entering?

  14. Not a huge sample size, but to get the male view she could ask Nick Clegg his opinion, as 52 is near to his reported number of conquests.

  15. There’s no doubt, this woman talks an enormous amount of sense. In future, I’m going to take total responsibility for contraception.
    Let’s try it now.
    “Darling. Let’s make love”
    “What?”
    “You’re not on the pill?
    “Don’t worry my love. I’m taking total responsibility for contraception”
    “What? You’re going & never want to see me again? You think I’m a fucking nutcase?”
    (Shrugs)
    “What did I say?”

  16. Throughout my sexually active life it’s been me that has used condoms, never the woman I’ve been with.

  17. @BiC

    The last time I had this conversation was discussing a trial of a male contraceptive pill. Some feminist was claiming such a thing was pointless because no woman would trust a man who said “Don’t worry, I’m on the pill”, and missed the point that the reverse situation is exactly why a male pill might be useful.

    I was probably thinking about that which is why I mentioned pills.

  18. ‘Of course if men were shouldering a majority of the various burdens’

    It would have been a solved problem long ago.

    As it turns out, the contraceptive pill was invented by a man to solve the problem of a whining woman.

  19. “*cough* anal *cough*”

    But it’s still advisable to use a condom – to avoid a urinary tract infection, if nothing else.

  20. But it’s still advisable to use a condom – to avoid a urinary tract infection, if nothing else.

    Easily solved by a quick wipe on the curtains when done.

  21. Tim Newman – “Like putting on condoms with their mouths?”

    That can work even without the condom. I hear. Because, you know, I never have that problem. Honestly!

  22. “Easily solved by a quick wipe on the curtains when done.”

    Not sure the curtains will get her faecal matter out of your urethra…

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