You only need one word to understand this report

Saturated fat does not increase the risk of a heart attack by clogging up arteries, three cardiologists have said in a challenge to medical thinking, sparking a furious backlash.

In an editorial published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine the cardiologists also write that relying on foodstuffs marketed as “low fat” or “proved to lower cholesterol” to avoid heart disease is “misguided”.

A key previous research study, they say, “showed no association between saturated fat consumption and all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease, CHD mortality, ischaemic stroke or type-2 diabetes in healthy adults”. Instead they say that a Mediterranean-style diet and 22 minutes of walking a day are the best ways to prevent heart problems.

The paper co-authored by Pascal Meier, a cardiologist at University College London and editor of the journal BMJ Open Heart; Rita Redberg, the editor of the American journal JAMA Internal Medicine; and Aseem Malhotra

And when we reach that word Malhotra we can stop because we know the whole thing is bollocks.

Doesn’t even matter if they’re right, it will be woo and bollocks.

21 comments on “You only need one word to understand this report

  1. That saturated is less dangerous than unsaturated has been known for some decades –outside of the trendy leftist cockrot halls of public (supposed) health agitators.

    What has this Malahotra character done to upset you Tim?

  2. What’s Malhotra’s motivation?

    I doubt he’s thick – he’s a doctor after all. I doubt he’s deliberately malicious either, though I wouldn’t rule it out. Does he just enjoy seeing his name in print? Or does he enjoy the warm glow of being part of the bien-pensant class of avocado-eating Guardianistas?

    Some outsiders will do all sorts of bizarre things to be granted access to the right-thinking classes (think Al-Fayed buying Harrods and Fulham FC). Psychologically, the person believes themselves to be an unworthy fraud. My guess is that Malhotra can be found every lunchtime queuing up at his local McDonalds drive-thru.

  3. Whether or not it’s bollocks can be assessed without considering Malahotra.
    You are using a sort of anti- appeal-to-authority.
    And you are talkng bollocks.

  4. “they say that a Mediterranean-style diet and 22 minutes of walking a day are the best ways to prevent heart problems”

    So that’s the fried pork & chips, with no other vegetables whatsoever, followed by the tooth-acheingly sweet dessert, then? Good oh! Does ambling round the town square count?

  5. Mr Ecks & Andrew M – Malhotra was a leading light of Action on Sugar, a spin-off of Concern Action on Salt and Health (CASH):
    http://www.actiononsalt.org.uk/actiononsugar/Press%20Release%20/120020.html
    CASH are a classic fakecharity, primarily funded by a large bequest from a car retail magnate who had a relaxed attitude towards tax payments.

    He’s been pushing the “eat more fat, less sugar” for a while now:
    http://www.bbc.com/news/health-36345768
    and even had the temerity to go after beer:
    https://hemiposterical.blogspot.com/2014/02/now-cash-are-going-after-beer.html

  6. That saturated is less dangerous than unsaturated has been known for some decades

    Ecks, is that true? Did I miss it. For example, things like olive oil “worse” than saturated fats?

  7. James Strong

    You are using a sort of anti- appeal-to-authority.

    Fine principle (not using it), but for spud it does in fact work ~99% of the time – you can test it for yourself..:)

  8. As I was born before the cocpt of “bad food” I’ve always assumed it doesn’t apply to me.

  9. bloke in Spain

    Nah, with that diet, you’ve already died and gone to heaven. So you don’t need to worry!

  10. You have to love the precision of the 22 minutes don’t you. No-one stops to consider that all these studies on the Mediterranean diet, are usually based on people living in the Mediterranean, who might have different genes, different family structures, and different climate to us. That’s before you get to the really serious problems with these studies. More bollocks. If the boffins get the flu vaccine wrong, as they did last winter, excess deaths from this can easily overwhelm all other factors.

  11. In an editorial published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine

    Cracking journal there. I wonder if anyone would have noticed if these people hadn’t e-mails their work to the Mail?

    A key previous research study, they say, “showed no association between saturated fat consumption and all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease, CHD mortality, ischaemic stroke or type-2 diabetes in healthy adults”. Instead they say that a Mediterranean-style diet and 22 minutes of walking a day are the best ways to prevent heart problems.

    As is well known, everything we have been told about diet has been wrong. It has been driven by a punitive Puritanism rather than actual science. Meat is not bad for you and it does not cause heart disease and so on.

    However notice they have got the new science right, or at least can quote it accurately, but they have got the solution wrong. The Mediterranean diet was what we were supposed to eat instead of meat. Fish, vegetables and bread. There is no evidence it is actually good for you.

    They are still pushing their pet barrow contrary to what pathetic evidence we have.

    I am pleased to see there is some robust common sense in Northern Ireland:

    However, some experts did back the authors. Dr Mary Hannon-Fletcher, head of the school of health sciences at Ulster University, hailed their views as “the best dietary and exercise advice I have read in recent years. Walking 22 minutes a day and eating real food. This is an excellent public health message.

    “The modern idea of a healthy diet where we eat low-fat and low-calorie foods is simply not a healthy option. All of these foods have been so altered they are anything but healthy. So eating real foods in moderation and exercising daily is the answer to keeping fit and healthy; it’s just too simple a message for the public to take on board,” she said.

    Yeah she is probably an anti-processed-food nut but that is pretty much the best health advice she could give.

  12. “a Mediterranean-style diet”: hurray, heaps of pasta with a tiny dollop of meat sauce, and plenty of bread to wipe the plate with. Sounds a pretty bad idea to me.

    Wittering about “real foods” is presumably just empty moralising too. It clearly has nothing to do with science. Just like the category “junk food”, another science-free concept.

    And 22 minutes. Is this unconsciously based on the calibre of firearms? How about 38 minutes or 45 minutes? Or metric: 9 minutes. Or metric WWII: 88 minutes.

  13. PF : Durk Pearson & Sandy Shaw’s “Life Extension Handbook” in 1982 was the first place I saw the idea mooted as unsaturated fat has vacant electron bonds available and saturated fat doesn’t and is thus less likely to form the dreaded free radicals.

    Seen it in a number of places since then.

    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/

    This link is interesting. He thinks sugar and carbs are not too good for you but he is not some kind of Commissar fanatic either.

  14. The big fat surprise – Nina Teicholz

    Read it. Careers staked on a hypothesis that pushes it others even though evidence is weak. Contrary evidence is suppressed.

    The story against fat misses many links in the chain of action. The competing sugar hypothesis doesn’t have missing links for action. Fascinating stuff.

    Science is no less prone to human weakness in hiding bad stuff than any other field. Why would it be any different? Climate change is another area of interest. Bad evidence aplenty even if a plausible mechanism for action exists in that case.

    No prospect of meaningful controlled experiments in either case…..

  15. Out of interest, bilbaoboy, what do the locals eat at your end of Dagoland? I’ve eaten in the homes of a lot of working class Andalus & pig ‘n chips turns up with monotonous regularity. As it does in most of the off-the-tourist-map, low end restaurants. Although they do vary it sometimes with chips ‘n pig. Either way, it’s generally just the two on the plate & white bread to mop up the grease. Vegetables & ensalada happen more to the holiday crowd.
    The Cyps I know in London don’t seem to be much different. Although sheep gets more of a mention & the honey soaked pastries are somewhere off the sweetness scale.And come to think of it, the ex was originally from Provence & she seemed to have much the same vitamin avoidance strategies.

  16. dearieme – “Sounds a pretty bad idea to me.”

    As if Italian grandmothers don’t get fat on that diet. These days anyway. All of this is based on a trip that Ancel Keys made to the south of Italy soon after the war. Nothing else.

    “Wittering about “real foods” is presumably just empty moralising too. It clearly has nothing to do with science.”

    Well sure, up to a point. Up to WW1 the West had strict labeling laws that said if you sold a pork sausage it had to, like, contain pork. Now it only has to contain a certain amount of pork. There is a difference between real food and the sort of processed foods we get these days although it is mostly a question of taste and good manners.

    “And 22 minutes. Is this unconsciously based on the calibre of firearms? How about 38 minutes or 45 minutes? Or metric: 9 minutes. Or metric WWII: 88 minutes.”

    I assume that started out as two and a half hours a week. Then they rounded to the nearest number. Again, the very precision shows it is nonsense. But it is not a bad suggestion. People should get out and exercise more. I would respect this if it came in the proper measure – 18 holes of golf. Two and a half hours sounds about right for the oldies around my way when they have a mind to.

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