Guardian wibble closes comments again

Yep, the moderators had to close comments again:

It’s a story many black women will find familiar. Pain and discomfort endured because we thought it a necessary price to pay for hair that was closer to “good”, flowing, white women’s hair. By telling us that “hair hate is real”, SheaMoisture’s advert took black women’s stories of physical and emotional torment bound up in our hair and served them back to us with a good dose of whitewashing, plus a healthy sprinkling of colourism for added bitterness. This is a company birthed by the recipes of a Liberian woman, but which has plainly erased dark-skinned black women out of a picture of our own making.

Why did no one mention a course of psychiatric help rather than one in journalism?

34 comments on “Guardian wibble closes comments again

  1. Is this woman Ironman in disguise? Eventually even the Guardian’s own readers will get fed up of being told they’re racists three times before breakfast . A few will self-denounce but most will start to see through this bollocks. The only question is whether it will be too late.

  2. “Black women who wear their hair natural invariably have a story to tell about their journey to that resolution. “

    Really..? That’s not just you?

  3. “Black women who wear their hair natural invariably have a story to tell about their journey to that resolution. “

    What an interesting story that must be… is it similar to everyone else’s story? – had my hair one way for a while and the realised it look stupid, tried a few others that looked stupid too, settled for the current style as least stupid…

    Think we could make a movie out of that?

  4. Peak Guardian candidate.

    Still, you know things are getting better when their subject for this weeks Race Baiting Hour is a hair product.

  5. No his daughters were saved by the “Tinplate Terror of Anti-Racism”.

    You should have your own comic book Tinribs but the SJW bollocks you spout would make an insomnia clinic a much more profitable business for you.

  6. What’s the argument? That dark black women with crinkly hair consider themselves ugly? That’s very sad but it’s got bugger all to do with me.

    Is it subtler? Crinkly hair is ugly, but dark black women also hate lighter skinned black women because.

    Damned if I know. As long as I don’t have to pay for their hair treatment on the NHS, damned if I care.

  7. On the plus side, I think I can infer what “colourist” means, so there’s an addition to my vocabulary. Hats off to them for taking what is (I dare say) an American notion and correcting the spelling.

  8. “Black women who wear their hair natural”: does anyone wear their hair ‘natural’? I get mine cut from time to time. Don’t we all?

  9. Jack C

    That’s excellent. Perhaps men can get in on the act too…

    Mismatched shoes? Or just cuff links if that’s too bold? (Socks, obviously not, that’s just normal.)

  10. “Just when you’re thinking geopolitics can’t actually can’t get any more hostile to progressive values, Ivanka Trump weaponises the mismatched earring.”

    There’s something perfectly wrong about this line. I can’t put my finger on it, but this somehow sums up everything wrong about the left in a way that even Stalin didn’t quite manage.

  11. “How are those anger issues going? Are your daughters still frightened by you?”

    Eh? I don’t have any anger issues and my kids all love me because I’m a great dad. (You weirdo.)

    🙂

  12. By telling us that “hair hate is real”, SheaMoisture’s advert took black women’s stories of physical and emotional torment bound up in our hair and served them back to us with a good dose of whitewashing, plus a healthy sprinkling of colourism for added bitterness.

    You’d have to have a heart of stone not to laugh out loud at that particular sentence.

  13. Rob said:
    “’Colourist’ used to mean a painter.”

    I thought it used to mean someone who made paints. Late 19th, early 20th century there were artists’ colourists who made and mixed up oil paints and watercolours.

    I think the term is still used in the car industry for people who mix up matching paints for respraying after repair work.

  14. ‘SheaMoisture was forced to apologise’

    Forced?

    What I love is . . . Guardian closes comments, Tim opens them back up!

  15. ‘This week it was SheaMoisture’s turn to see how forceful the backlash can be when black women’s struggles are appropriated and we’re recast as secondary characters in our own narratives. Let’s hope others take note.’

    Indeed people are taking notes – but almost certainly not for the reasons this person would approve of…..

  16. Well, if nothing else the Guardian seems to have reached peak niche market. They’re now producing articles targeted solely at 4 women sitting in a Women’s Diversity Workshop in Dalston. And one of them can’t read English.

  17. “how forceful the backlash can be when black women’s struggles are appropriated”

    Oh dear, it’s a blacklash.

  18. So, let me get this straight.

    A company is not allowed to aim products at white women – *they* must be inclusive*, but one that got its start selling in the black community is locked there forever?

    Because ‘they’re *owed*’? Or is Shea ‘owned’ – as in slaves now?

  19. dearieme – “What’s the argument? That dark black women with crinkly hair consider themselves ugly? That’s very sad but it’s got bugger all to do with me.”

    It is sad. And apparently it is your fault because you, or society as a whole, make them think about it every now and then instead of just unconditionally loving them for who they are.

    But it is especially sad because no one should feel ashamed of their race and yet a lot of Black women really are concerned about their hair. It is not just middle class Western Blacks. African women – who should really have more pressing issues – do too. But then Psychology Today will un-publish an article and ban an author for pointing out that African origin women are more masculine and the least preferred across the planet. So it must be a touchy subject.

  20. The worrying thing is that the author of this piece is a teacher and therefore in control of impressionable minds. If you read her earlier pieces (as I have – I like a good laugh) it is very obvious that Logic is not her first or even second language.

    Having said that, my ex-wife was (and still is, I believe) a black woman. And she was obsessed with her hair, having braids, extensions, straitening and even wearing wigs on occasion. I have to say I enjoyed the variety, but not the angst.

  21. @PF – nah, that’s the point of the red and green, so you can instantly tell whether something is getting closer or further away.

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