This amuses

It Is To Laugh At Their Mistake – EU’s Brexit Bill Claim Now At €100 Billion

The higher the divorce bill gets then the higher would have been the cost of staying in. For they are only asking for what we would rightfully have paid anyway, right?

Makes £350 million for the NHS look like small beer, doesn’t it? And the ever higher that divorce bill goes, the more righteous Brexit itself is, right?

“So, Michel and Jean-Claude, if we’d stayed in it would have cost us €100 billion, yes?”

“Oui!”

“Good thing we’re leaving then, eh?”

46 comments on “This amuses

  1. There’s no such thing as a divorce bill, well divorces cost money but are we saying UK has to pay alimony?

  2. The more nonsense like that they peddle the better.

    The Remainiacs will find it ever harder to claim affection for a group of arrogant , dictatorial, thieving sharks–let alone suggest that the rest of the country should kiss EU arse a moment longer.

  3. From the “Gates of Vienna” blog:

    “In other news, supporters of British Prime Minister Theresa May accuse the German government of attempting to undermine the prime minister with its briefings on Brexit talks.”

    That has always been the squarehead style. Even in the old days of radio.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_Haw-Haw

    At least he didn’t have the brass neck to be holding out a begging bowl as well.

  4. The rEU needs to have the right to tax its citzens directly in order to replace the income formerly collected from muggins English Tax Payers.
    I suggest that rEU imposts are streamed so those remaining in captivity can decide if their tax deduction goes to pay for (say) the Brussels wine cellars or the empty History of Europe facility or whatever.

  5. €100B?

    20 years of net contributions?

    From the Diane Abbot school of Pulling Figures Out Of Your Arse…

  6. The EU can’t survive without British dosh, so “you can check out any time you like, but you can never leave.” As the popular ditty has it. It’s perfectly straightforward.

  7. Presumably that 100 billion would have brought us some benefits. So why can’t we have them, even if we leave? Though I’m struggling to think what we could want that is worth that money…..

  8. How are they going to get the money?

    Not much point invading Poland nowadays, Angela.

  9. Yarp. Mr Ecks is right.

    BTW, my admiration for Mrs May (starting from a low base, admittedly) is growing over her handling of the Brexit process. She’ll never be the Iron Lady, but Bronze might work well enough for our immediate purposes.

    From Tim’s Forbes piece:

    Brussels demands […] a £92billion (€100billion) divorce bill today after it emerged Germany, France and Poland had ganged up to inflate the sum.

    I expect this sort of thing from France and Germany, and it’s all part of the fun. Like Michael Howard obliquely threatening the dagos over Gibraltar – good knockabout stuff that nobody involved takes seriously, and nor should they.

    But Poland? A country that has snaffled our subsidies and exported its entire plumbing and barista castes here since 2004?

    The same Poland that’s always whingeing about how we should foot the bill for their defence against Russia?

    They think we owe them something now?

    Cheeky fuckers.

  10. Seen elsewhere: “You need not comment on the “ridiculous EU money claim” because there has been no formal claim tendered. The rest of the media is reacting to a speculative and tendentious piece in the Financial Times, which has very little substance and relies entirely on estimates based on speculative premises.”
    If there is an actual claim it will be documented somewhere because that’s what the EU does. I can’t find it. Does the claim exist? Can anyone post a link?
    I stand to be corrected, but I suspect that this is just another indication that May, Davis and the media are to Brexit negotiations as Tim’s friend the Spud is to economics.

  11. @Ecks – Prior to WW2 a large swathe of the British establishment was in favour of appeasement, plus ça change as the German empire’s leading vassals like to say…

  12. The same Poland that’s always whingeing about how we should foot the bill for their defence against Russia?

    Indeed. May should request immediate clarification from the Polish government, and withdraw any Nato troops we have in the country immediately. If they are cooperative, maybe we’ll not let Putin know we’ve done so. Fuck them.

  13. The rest of the media is reacting to a speculative and tendentious piece in the Financial Times, which has very little substance and relies entirely on estimates based on speculative premises

    Half the problem is the media twats in London are reporting EU bluster uncritically as news.

  14. I was impressed by May because of the job she did facing down ACPO, the organisation made of people who believe we are all here to do as they say….

    Nice of Juncker to screw her over early on, so we’re under no illusions. I expect May will do an excellent job of kicking them into touch, despite the naysayers we have in the British press.

  15. I really don’t understand what the EU are up to. Do they not realise all this ‘You vill obey and pay vot we vont’ stchick is playing 100% into TM’s hands? She couldn’t have it better if she’d written the script herself. Its worth about 1% extra on the Tory vote every time this stuff hits the media. If a picture of Druncker accompanies it, 2%. They are making it so much easier for TM to sell us walking away sticking two fingers up at them to the UK public, one might almost think thats what the EU want, its appears to be so contrary to what one would think they should be doing, which would be to appear all conciliatory while the election is on, then to hit us hard with demands out of the blue when the negotiations start proper.

  16. A week or so ago I tried searching google for an explanation of what the 60 billion was actually for.

    I can’t recreate the search now, but number 5 or 6 on the search list was a scare story, I mean serious research, done by a German University in the run-up to June 23rd.

    The research was pretty scary, raising the prospect of a very heavy bill should the UK vote to leave. There were the usual “could be’s” and “up to’s”, so obviously inflated, and they came up with ……. 25 billion (euros I think).

    Give it another couple of months and who knows? Luckily we can just create the money and toss it over if we so wish.

  17. Jim

    I really don’t understand what the EU are up to.

    Is the EU so naive (they have form, lots) that they believe they can influence the election with this stuff? Make people think that they shouldn’t vote Conservative / maybe they were wrong to vote Leave.

    Away from the gloss, I’m trying to understand if their strategies have any logic / substance (I’m open to suggestions?) or are just delusional.

  18. “Is the EU so naive (they have form, lots) that they believe they can influence the election with this stuff? Make people think that they shouldn’t vote Conservative / maybe they were wrong to vote Leave.”

    At face value it appears that yes thats what they’re trying to do. But are they so ignorant of the British character? Do they really believe that all they have to do is rattle a few sabres and we’ll go running to the skirts of Tim Farron begging for him to protect from the Nasty Man? Is there no-one within the EU Commission that has any cultural knowledge of the UK whatsoever who could have informed them this was not a sensible strategy?

    Or as I wondered are they just aiming to drive us out ASAP?

  19. Is there no-one within the EU Commission that has any cultural knowledge of the UK whatsoever who could have informed them this was not a sensible strategy?

    In effect, we’re talking about the class that is EU Steve / Remainia etc posting on here earlier (I think he inadvertently admitted at one point he was “a part”?).

    I’m not sure, from his earlier posts, that people like that do understand these things. They appear too detached themselves from the mindset of the majority of normal people?

    Though, personally, I hope you’re right. it might as well be ASAP, and then all focus and efforts can be on trying to make ‘whatever we have’ work to best effect.

    It’s no different to a quick clean divorce in that respect. The long acrimonious drawn out affairs can cause far more permanent damage to both sides in the long run.

  20. Jack C

    So they thought of a number and then doubled it and now they’ve doubled it again. I believe that this is the traditional method.

  21. The EU is used to dealing with supplicants, countries that want or need something from them, like entry into the union, grants or loans.
    They have no experience dealing with non supplicants, and cannot conceive that life could be better outside.
    Expect lots and lots of ridiculous “offers” and don’t expect a deal. They are too full of their own importance to deal with an equal. Hence their abysmal record of getting agreements with non EU actors.

  22. I think the plan is to create a grievance which the EU can then use to obstruct even WTO rules for us.
    Looks like it might come to a fight then between us and our mates and the Germans and their mates.
    As they have a habit of regularly coming second on these important occasions (I don’t like football) I feel quite chipper about the eventual outcome. Especially with Italy and the Balkans on their side – countries that you might think of as the Axis. And this time they have to work WITH the cheese eating surrender monkeys (bankrupt).

  23. Whilst I agree with the general tone here, it must be pointed out that many Remainers are cock-a-hoop at all this. I do not recommend it for anyone on any sort of medication (though if you are not now you will want to be afterwards) but a perusal of the Guardian comments on Brexit ‘articles’ show any number of morons pointing out the ‘the EU holds all the cards’ and various dribbles to the same general effect.

    Not much backbone (or any other sort of bone) being shown there.

    There really are a lot of people (an entire class, it seems) who hate the UK and want to see it brought down, by any means possible. Lamposts are going to be in very short supply if they get their way.

  24. But are they so ignorant of the British character?

    They’ve probably gleaned what they know of it from reading Oliver Kamm’s Twitter feed.

  25. I believe May has just offered them a corrective view to Mr Kamm’s assessment of the British character…

  26. They have no experience dealing with non supplicants, and cannot conceive that life could be better outside.

    Indeed. Corporations act like this towards their employees, too. It’s all veiled threats, little hints about how their careers or actual job could suffer. 99% of employees yield because they have kids to raise and mortgages to pay, and this has become the norm.

  27. “There really are a lot of people (an entire class, it seems) who hate the UK and want to see it brought down, by any means possible.”

    But they are the minority. Brexit showed that. A vocal one but a minority nonetheless. Not only did 52% vote to leave in the face of the most strident threats about what would happen if we did, presumably not all Remain voters hate the UK, some just thought on balance being in was better than out. I’d hazard a guess that the current EU stance is turning those reluctant Remainers into Brexiteers rather rapidly, hence the popularity of Mrs May.

    Hence my confusion as to what they are trying to achieve. Maybe its that they think that a Hard Brexit will be the worst punishment for the UK, so are manoeuvring to create that as quickly as possible.

    Of course if we make it work they’ll look pretty stupid and have shown any other leavers that its possible to walk away without paying a penny and do fine……………….

  28. Junckers wants us out of the EU as we are seen to be slowing down the ever closer union. However it has to be done in a way that makes sure no one else will follow us, hence it will be hard brexit regardless of what we want, or the damage done to the people of Europe.

  29. Slightly OT, re that dinner, given Junkers’ track record how do we know he was sober enough to remember what was said?

  30. An awful lot of Remoaners don’t seem to understand the difference between difficulties that arise out of wanting something impossible and difficulties that stem from EU intransigence and our own past blinkered policy.

    All we want, based on a democratic vote, is to make our own laws where possible rather than have them made by a supranational body. This is a situation every country outside the EU enjoys. If it’s hard for us to achieve it then it’s a result of 25 years of misrule that, far from being wise and sophisticated, has given people like Juncker too much power over us.

    The cries of “we told you so” are going up. In fact the argument that we shouldn’t try and leave the EU because they’ll be pig-headed, intransigent dickheads wasn’t exactly to the fore in the Remain campaign’s pronouncements, even if plenty suspected it’d be true.

  31. Alternatively it has little to do with Britain and is all about scaring the shit out of anyone else thinking of leaving.

  32. “I do not recommend it for anyone on any sort of medication (though if you are not now you will want to be afterwards) but a perusal of the Guardian comments on Brexit ‘articles’ show any number of morons pointing out the ‘the EU holds all the cards’ and various dribbles to the same general effect”

    Try James O Brien on LBC if you want to see a truly weird netherworld of bitter delusion. I think it actually features actors phoning in to agree with him (“Brexiteers” who have changed their mind in light of the evil Tory lack of plan). And when a real person does phone in to disagree (they only allow morons) he has about 6 producers googling facts for him to win on a technicality.

  33. Could the EU be trying to support their man in Paris by threatening the UK and by making it look difficult to leave? Their election is far more immediate than ours.

  34. So, nobody so far has posted a link to the EU’s Brexit bill claim. Looks like it is just a fake news fiction got up by the FT and echoed round our failing media, triggering widespread sound and fury that signifies nothing save profound ignorance.
    The EU can’t make it “difficult” for us to leave – we get to leave automatically. It’s just that if we want to trade as other than a Third Country (hint: look up the implications) we need a trade deal, and that needs unanimous agreement of the 27. So we’d need to be offering something that they’d unanimously agree to, which would likely involve paying for things that we’ve already committed to. And it won’t be as good a deal as the existing membership, because if it were every state would leave.
    We can say “FU EU” and walk away, but it’s unlikely to be any fun – after the initial pleasure of so saying – unless of course lost jobs, food shortages, riots, martial law, etc are your thing.
    Wouldn’t it be much better if May et al had done their homework and were even half competent – and actively pursuing EFTA membership as the only sensible path out of the EU?
    (ducks, covers and awaits SJW style point & shriek ad hom attacks)

  35. The EU is an imperial project, the Fourth Reich, and it sees itself as an economic super-power. Members of the EU are Germany’s vassal states. States neighbouring the EU must pay tribute to the EU and accept the primacy of the ECJ in their relations with the EU – e.g. Switzerland and Norway. The EU intends to treat the UK as a similar supplicant that must pay tribute, defer to the EU in diplomacy, and accept the ECJ as the arbitrator in trade and other disputes. Like most empires, it has a formal dominion and an informal one: the EU sees the UK’s destiny as part of its informal empire. Accordingly, the EU is striking an assertive, even aggressive, pose, partly to satisfy its institutional and imperial vanity and partly to intimidate potential leave voters in the vassal states and Germany itself.

    As for Poland, it’s the EU’s largest net beneficiary, receiving €8.5bn pa. The EU is about to lose its third largest net contributor, and Poland is worried that the handouts could be reduced.

  36. We can say “FU EU” and walk away, but it’s unlikely to be any fun – after the initial pleasure of so saying – unless of course lost jobs, food shortages, riots, martial law, etc are your thing.

    Lol.

  37. “We can say “FU EU” and walk away, but it’s unlikely to be any fun – after the initial pleasure of so saying – unless of course lost jobs, food shortages, riots, martial law, etc are your thing.”

    WTF?

    Even assuming that they broke WTO rules and called for a blockade of the UK, how many countries would tell the EU to go fuck themselves? Where’s Ireland’s butter going to go, or Denmark’s bacon? You think these people are going to willingly get a lot poorer for the sake of European unity? Ain’t going to happen.

    This is mostly how I feel about the EU right now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-qR0Uke2XNI

  38. WTF indeed.
    Although fine viewing, Youtube movies about Sparta won’t get us a workable deal.
    The problem is that we will, by our own actions, become a “Third Country”. That means that the EU will (under its own rules and WTO rules) have to treat us the same as any other Third Country. That means e.g. all agricultural imports to EU states will need to be presented, with paperwork, at a Border Inspection Post. There aren’t that many of these as they aren’t needed at present. No doubt more can be built, but who will pay, and how long will it take? Milk products in Ireland currently go back and forth across the border all the time. And without a deal a sudden gridlock ensues. And that’s just one tiny aspect of what will happen. Hence the list of unpleasent things that will probably happen.
    So, why can’t they just throw away the rulebook and take our goods same as now? Think on… We can’t even start to have a sensible debate until we know something about the subject that we are discussing and if we carry on acting in ignorance all we will get is pain. Just one example of ignorance is this whole thread, debating an “EU demand” that is just something made up by the FT.

  39. Milk products in Ireland currently go back and forth across the border all the time. And without a deal a sudden gridlock ensues.

    Or, back in the real world, they slip across a porous land border that wasn’t even sealed when Martin McGuinness and friends were murdering their way across Northern Ireland.

  40. “The problem is that we will, by our own actions, become a “Third Country”. That means that the EU will (under its own rules and WTO rules) have to treat us the same as any other Third Country. That means e.g. all agricultural imports to EU states will need to be presented, with paperwork, at a Border Inspection Post. There aren’t that many of these as they aren’t needed at present. No doubt more can be built, but who will pay, and how long will it take? Milk products in Ireland currently go back and forth across the border all the time. And without a deal a sudden gridlock ensues. And that’s just one tiny aspect of what will happen. Hence the list of unpleasent things that will probably happen.”

    You seen to be conflating several things.
    1) The EU countries could introduce all manner of non tariff barriers to OUR exports of food, yes. This means there would be more food floating around the UK market place looking for a home, so while bad for farmers, not bad for consumers, as prices would drop.
    2) Just because the EU countries introduce lots of non tariff barriers to our exports does NOT mean we would have to reciprocate. If for some reason we were short of bacon or butter how stupid would we be to make it hard for other countries to export it to us?

    So unless you think we will artificially restrict imports of food into the UK, to our own detriment, there is absolutely no way that there are going to be any shortages of food whatsoever. Anyone who so much as hints at that is a liar and charlatan

  41. Jim, I agree entirely *in the long term* all will be fine (probably better as we will be out of the EU) – the problem will be the sudden transition. Suddenly being unable to export the agricultural products that they do now will be bankruptcy inducing for farmers as the logistics and markets won’t be set up to divert the production to new markets. Perishable produce in the wrong place at the wrong time is just waste.
    And agriculture is just one small part of a complex system built up over 40+ years. You can’t suddenly just turn that round so it will be a sea of pain if (when) we leave without a deal.
    We’ll see soon enough whether I’m “a liar and charlatan” – I hope I am, but I don’t think I will be.
    And back to the topic of this thread – anyone found that “EU Demand” yet? Anyone?

  42. ” Suddenly being unable to export the agricultural products that they do now will be bankruptcy inducing for farmers as the logistics and markets won’t be set up to divert the production to new markets. Perishable produce in the wrong place at the wrong time is just waste.”

    So what? Food that is currently exported is by definition not going to feed UK consumers. If it can’t be exported it either gets diverted to home markets, or disposed of. Imports will be unaffected by all this, unless we cut our noses off to spite our faces, by voluntarily restricting them. So, yes some food exporters might face losses, but where exactly are the ‘shortages’ of food you talk of coming from? Or are they just scaremongering by someone who knows SFA about the UK food production system and markets?

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