Honeybuns, why not just all join the same party?

Jeremy Corbyn needs to get round a table with the Greens to discuss ways of developing a progressive alliance, it’s co-leader Caroline Lucas has said.

If the aim is to have only the one anti-Tory possibility for voters to, umm, vote for, then why is it that there shouldn’t be only the one anti-Tory party?

My own assumption is that this would mean not enough leadership positions for all the egos involved. But no doubt there are more cynical explanations possible.

23 comments on “Honeybuns, why not just all join the same party?

  1. Because the labour party are far too pro-industrial socialism and (in theory) want to forward policies for material abundance for the masses, while the greens are just austerity-socialists, middle class ‘moralists’ and neo-malthusian moronic shites who aim for us all to be poor and think working class people going on cheap flights on holiday is a terrible thing.

    The Greens are no longer the proper explicit reactionaries of the 70s, where is was a bit too fash, but their cloaking of left wing policies and iconography doesnt fool me. I remind all my labour mates and commie mates the greens are not progressives and are as far as you can get from what the left should acually aspire to be.

    Good point on the leadership egos point, hadnt thought of that.

  2. “Because the labour party are far too pro-industrial socialism and (in theory) want to forward policies for material abundance for the masses”

    Labour used to be like that. A long time ago.

  3. OT- anyone else see Murphy’s blog claiming that Labour (under McDonnell and Corbyn) aren’t left wing enough?

    My mind is boggling…

  4. Couple of striking things about that Beeb sentence:

    “It’s” – bloody hell. Remember when you could expect proper grammer an that? At this rate of mongolisation BBC news will just be dank memes and yoofs hashtagging #YOLO by 2020.

    “Co-leader” – what, in the name of Stephen Fry’s gigantic pink face, is a “co-leader”?

    If you need a “co-“, in what sense are you the leader?

    Was this based on any sort of successful real world model? The papal tag team that runs the Vatican, perhaps. Or Their Majesties the Queens?

  5. “My own assumption is that this would mean not enough leadership positions for all the egos involved.”

    I think it’s more that the sort of people involved in both are rather impractical sorts. They want purity in their politics. They’ll take a massive loser like Corbyn and get nothing, and even be happy about it, rather than say, Yvette Cooper who stands a chance of delivering something.

    Conservatives aren’t like that. They’ll get out there and knock on doors for someone at the other wing of the party. Someone who is further away from them politically than the Greens and Labour are. Because they’ll sacrifice bits of what they’d like to get most of what they like.

  6. @TIS. Goldman Sachs. Just about ever fkr there is co-head of something. And they are pretty successful on their own terms.

  7. Inim. Steve

    Co-Leaders – the Spartans did all right with them, for a while.

  8. My apologies, Steve, on rereading it’s obvious you intended that. I would have seen it the first time only I’m a dick.

  9. Jeremy Corbyn needs to get round a table with the Greens to discuss ways of developing a progressive alliance, it’s co-leader Caroline Lucas has said.

    Translation: Jeremy, please make me relevant.

  10. In the Teeside mayoral elections, the first round difference between Labour and Conservative was 0.5%. 2nd preferences were then counted and they broke 7:6 in favour of the conservatives.
    On that small sample of one anybody standing down in favour of being ‘progressive’ could be making no difference to the anti-Tory cause. the free market has this covered anyway through the mechanism of tactical voting of you dislike the favourite badly enough.

  11. @ Bongo
    Thanks for pointing that out but “Tees-side” not “Teeside”, the river is the Tees, not the Tee (at least your error is less than that of the London bureaucrats who decided to stage an election of a Mayor of Barnard Castle, Middleton-in-Teesdale and surrounding areas to administer services around Teesmouth).

  12. @john77
    I’ve twice pedalled across the Infinite Tee bridge in Stockton so thought that was the river below.
    Thanks for the correction.

  13. Plaid Cymru under (English first language) Leanne Wood also belongs in that party. The core plank of Ms Wood’s policy offer is (as it was in 2015) “We ‘ate the Torieees!”

    Mindful that most of Wales voted solidly “out”, though Plaid are europhile, Ms Wood talks about stopping a “hard Tory Brexit” suggesting that the only reason Wales voted to Leave was the promise of an extra £350m a week for the NHS which she characterises as a lie.

    Our recently-elected new councillor (also English first language) would also be more at home in Momentum, believing that the Evil Tories want to sell the NHS to their wealthy friends (some of them American) who will then make enormous profits by selling health care to the impoverished natives at extortionate prices.

  14. Bear in mind with the Tories knocking on 50% in the polls, an alliance is the only possibility of relevance for the rest. Won’t happen of course.

  15. TIS: what’s a “co-leader”? Well, I suppose: Nick Clegg, a more useless papilloma on the scrotum of the British body politic it would be impossible to imagine.

  16. In 1920s municipal politics the “progressive alliance” was to keep the socialists out.

  17. Can’t give the proles a choice, they might make the wrong one. So comrades, let us come together and ensure they cannot!

  18. @ Bongo
    Half the bridge is in Thornaby; never counted how many times I cycled across the Victoria Bridge.

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