Ritchie’s turning Tory now

Gotta get that vermine:

The Tories made no promises on tax increases yesterday, VAT excepted. This was not by choice. This was by necessity.

The reality is that as Theresa May also recognised yesterday markets are not the answer to all questions. And nor is individualism.

Add all this together and what she’s saying, whether through gritted teeth or belief, is that the state has a role in our future and that the direction of travel along which all parties have been headed, where tax cuts and a smaller state have been the only possibility on the agenda, is now no longer on the political road map.

It’s always been true that the Curajus State owes more to traditional conservatism than anything else of course. We poshos, enlightened by our winning the ovarian lottery, will tell the hoi polloi what to do.

31 comments on “Ritchie’s turning Tory now

  1. Murphy’s always been the master of the ideological handbrake turn when it suits his goals,

    I bet his undies are covered in skid marks.

  2. The UK government spent 38% of GDP in 2000, and 43% last year.

    Is this the small state towards which we have been careering?

  3. “It’s always been true that the Curajus State owes more to traditional conservatism than anything else”

    Isn’t it rather the other way round? The frit (rather than curajus) State breeds traditional conservatism to protect its interests. Of late, that traditional conservatism has been through the device of socialism. Whether the Labour or Tory version, there being little difference between the two.

  4. And when we’re looking at the State we should learn the lesson of corporation tax incidence. The State isn’t an independent entity. It doesn’t exist in real terms. It’s always people. Maybe the king & the barons. These days the apparatchiks are the one it embodies.

  5. It’s always been true that the Curajus State owes more to traditional conservatism than anything else of course.

    “Always”? More like ‘never’ – or perhaps ‘occasionally’. Traditional conservatism — Burke, Hume, Salisbury…up to Roger Scruton today – has abhorred collectivism. From Burke onwards, traditional conservatives have held that a government does not have the right to run up large debts and then throw the burden on the taxpayer – though, obviously, some of their colleagues have done just that.

    We poshos, enlightened by our winning the ovarian lottery, will tell the hoi polloi what to do.

    That’s hardly noblesse oblige or even Tory paternalism. Rather, it’s the mindset of the socialist technocrat.

  6. Rather, it’s the mindset of the socialist technocrat.

    And that’s what Ritchie sees himself as, isn’t it? He’s not actually particularly good at either element of it but that’s no great surprise.

  7. No wonder he’s happy; New Labour is going to win the election, it’s just that it’ll be Theresa May implementing their policies.

  8. Usually a posho will come along to tell you that “the hoi polloi” is bad grammar. Until he does you’ll have to make do with me. I do it only to point out that it may be bad Greek grammar but I don’t see why that necessarily makes it bad English grammar.

  9. I had low expectations of her, after her “state is a force for good” malarkey.

    It appears I was way too optimistic, and my worry that with the showers we have in charge, brexit would end up with us stuck with the worst of both worlds, will be proved right.

    I’m seething.

    Alex11
    +1

  10. ” traditional conservatives have held that a government does not have the right to run up large debts and then throw the burden on the taxpayer – though, obviously, some of their colleagues have done just that.”

    At the current rate the burden is on our grand and great grand children.

  11. At this stage the most important thing is Brexit. It haslways been clear that May is not a true conservative in the way most of us on this thread would like.

    For the next two years that doesn’t matter she has to get a mandate from voters and parliament in order to make Brexit a success, which is boud to require more compromises and deal making that would be possible if she only has a wafer thin majority.

    Once we’re out than politics as usual can resume and we can start arguing again about other important stuff.

    But for now I think we should give the space to do what no 1 task in the immediate future.

  12. She’s stolen so many policies from Milliband that from now on I’m calling her “Milli-May”.

  13. Tizio in Italia; yep, all the signs are there in her Wiki bio. I suspect that this election will be similar to 1979.

  14. “Traditional conservatism — Burke, Hume, Salisbury…up to Roger Scruton today ”

    Isn’t that theoretical conservatism, Theo? Traditional conservatism is a bunch of money-grabbing scum.

  15. I’m with Bloke in Italy. The time is not for arguing about Big State vs Small State, the time is to make sure we get out of the EU. To that end we need May to have a good majority so she’s not fighting on two fronts, in Brussels and Westminster. Once we are out the EU are never letting us back in so then we can get back to arguing what sort of independent Britain we want. A few years of Heathism isn’t going to ruin the nation, not getting out of the EU definitely will.

    I’m no more enamoured with the Tory manifesto that anyone else is around here I suspect, but we need to hold our noses and vote for it, for now.

  16. Surely, it’s also going to depend on the new intake of Tory MPs (presuming there is one) elected on a clear pro-Brexit agenda.
    UK generals aren’t presidentials. The PM just happens to be the leader of the largest party. Few long knives in the night & she’s joined the list of ex-PMs. New leader, with 5 years clear run, could follow a much different agenda.
    Who would you fancy?

  17. Jim,

    I take your point and though on the constituency vote it matters not what I do as the Tories will get 50%+ in the wider scheme of things it strengths her position for the negotiation.

    What worries me is that she’s throwing all those policies in to the manifesto so that she will get a pass from the HoL and before we know it she’s wound the economic clock back to 1975 before we have chance to raise objections.

  18. BiND – yep, though at what point will she get knifed by the MPs? Before she manages to wind the clock back or after?

  19. We survived Attlee, and Wilson, and Heath (apart from him taking us into the EEC), and we’ll survive May. What we can’t survive is being drawn into an EU superstate, and there’s plenty of the usual subjects who would happily sell us into it for free if they could, so we need out, NOW. Everything else is deck chair arrangements if we don’t get out.

  20. Don’t underestimate how fucked the country was after Wilson-Heath-Wilson, but it is true that Brexit is the only thing right now.

  21. It is a bit depressing that at a time when the Tories could have launched a manifesto that included taking back Hong Kong and Rhodesia (yes I know) by armed force and the rounding up and deporting of all trade unionists and STILL have won the election that instead we get this.

  22. @AndrewC – I agree, just don’t see how they’ve so badly read the electorate. Yes there’s a (shrinking) rump that like this cr&p but they’re going to vote labour anyway. Or maybe it’s us that are caught in a bubble not the cvnts in Westminster. Failing that CM has won…

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