Well, there’s an element of simplicity to it, certainly

Then an American official raised the idea of the Saudis’ buying a sophisticated radar system designed to shoot down ballistic missiles.

Sensing that the cost might be a problem, several administration officials said, Mr. Kushner picked up the phone and called Marillyn A. Hewson — the chief executive of Lockheed Martin, which makes the radar system — and asked her whether she could cut the price. As his guests watched slack-jawed, Ms. Hewson told him she would look into it, officials said.

Why not phone up and ask for money off?

11 comments on “Well, there’s an element of simplicity to it, certainly

  1. The NYT and the Guardian would never ask for money off – because they are idiots.

    Entirely coincidentally, they also make a huge loss.

  2. Surprised she want on the rom if they were discussing such a large contract.

  3. If plain talk is the new way then Hewson should have been there.

    She could have pointed at the Saudis princelings and said “Not a penny off for shite like them”.

  4. They should go for the tech companies’ solution. Sell a system that can protect against missiles 200km away. Then in a few years time, they can buy the expensive “upgrade package” to make it work on a 400km range. And the twist? The $12m upgrade is just a software setting.

  5. “They should go for the tech companies’ solution. Sell a system that can protect against missiles 200km away. Then in a few years time, they can buy the expensive “upgrade package” to make it work on a 400km range.”

    If it protects against missiles 200 km away, why would you want the upgrade? Just wait another few minutes and it’ll get a lot closer…

    Everyone knows that you should always haggle in Middle Eastern markets! And you can often do a deal for something else – get a discount on this one in exchange for a commitment to buy the next one, for example. Or agree to buy more of them at a lower price per item. There are lots of deals that can be done.

  6. @AndrewM I think the pricing works the other way. ABM systems that hit missiles from a long way off are the easy part. It’s the ones that pop out of submarines just offshore that are hard to hit in time.

  7. Sounds like objections to the Trump way of doing business. The correct way, of course, would have been the State apparatus acting as intermediary. With the Clinton Foundation getting a kick-back as it went past.

  8. “Personal touch”? Are you kidding me?

    We in the Real World call that “getting things done”… Or “business”, if you are into brevity.

    Something no journalistic cunt at any major newspaper seems to understand, much less experience.

    Timmy –

    This is a perfect example of why should never, ever call yourself a journalist.

  9. @Andrew M, May 20, 2017 at 11:00 am

    They should go for the tech companies’ solution. Sell a system that can… Then in a few years time, they can buy the expensive “upgrade package” to make it work faster. And the twist? The $xxx upgrade is just a software setting.

    Done similar on PC sales to SMBs. Offer PC, data migration, setup etc for £xxx with £xx[*] option for eg 30% performance boost when wanted for say 10% of package price. Supplied PC was CPU & Memory underclocked.

    Very popular as upgrade option would be from next year’s budget and provide a faster PC with no data migration/setup costs.

    * £xx was 50% of extra cost of faster CPU supplied. It was a risk, but ~90% of those who chose it followed through with upgrade.

  10. AlexM, NiV,
    Yep, feel free to adjust the example to match the actual tech involved. I admit to not knowing much about defence tech (except the F35).

    Regarding the F35: we were told that our new aircraft carriers could have cats & traps installed later, and thus we’d be able to use our existing aircraft. Then the price of the catapults miraculously octupled, and we ended up having to buy F35s.

    I’m sure creative minds could come up with a similar trick for the Saudi missile defence project.

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