Seems fair really

Nurses have been told to shape up so they are fit enough to do their job and to set an example to patients, in new standards from their regulator.

Amid spiralling obesity levels, the watchdog’s new rules for the first time say that Britain’s 650,000 nurses and midwives have a “professional responsibility for adopting a healthy lifestyle”.

More than half of NHS staff are obese or overweight, contributing to a £5bn annual bill for the health service on conditions caused by obesity.

Nurses will be told they must “maintain a level of personal fitness and wellbeing required to meet people’s needs for mental and physical care,” amid concern that too many are too unfit to carry out physical tasks.

Physician heal thyself and all that.

Wonder what the punishment for breaching professional standards will be though…..

35 comments on “Seems fair really

  1. My GP from a few years back was a decent enough woman and said she was worried about my weight. I just looked at her with a raised eyebrow, she was 5′ 6″ and about 200 lbs, so not just overweight, but actually obese. I said “I’m sure I will be fine”.

    Sure, showing a good example is all very well and it beats some of the hypocrisy of the “Health at every size” crowd, but making it some kind of disciplinary offence is just idiotic.

    Most people don’t choose to be fat, they just have modern lifestyles where they are more sedentary and comfortable than the human body is designed to cope with. Tim’s ongoing point about central heating is also a strong factor.

  2. ” they are more sedentary and comfortable than the human body is designed to cope with”

    Its not alchemy. If your lifestyle requires less calorie intake, then ingest less calories. Ingest slightly less calories than you require, or exert more calories (ie exercise), and a miracle of weight loss will ensue.

    As the VP says in VEEP, put less cake in your gob…

  3. It isn’t going to last anyway.

    “Our” precious NHS does fat shaming?

    How do you think that’s going to turn out?

    Plus –aside from the disciplinary offence nonsense which is dumb–what is going to happen to someone in the NHS who has come up with a good but anti-cultural Marxist idea?

    The silly twat has signed his/her own p45.

  4. I think it’s an interesting point. I mean, a lawyer who repeatedly gets into criminal legal difficulties may well find he is fined for bringing his profession into disrepute. So why shouldn’t an unhealthy doctor be treated likewise?

    On the other hand, state licensing and regulation are abominations.

  5. Whut?! Are they going to require GPs to observe government alcohol consumption guidelines next? Good luck with that.

  6. “A sad day when the NHS has no room for a Hattie Jacques Matron.”

    As far as I recall the NHS in those days didn’t hector you about your weight and drinking habits, and allowed you to smoke in hospital.

    If the Health Mafia want to lecture the proles about their health they damn better be paragons of virtue themselves, or its time to start turning the tables – in John Galt’s case above that would be the time to make a comment about the doctors own weight and what gives her the right to lecture you, the patient. If every overweight NHS employee had a mirror held up to them every time they lectured someone else there would be a lot less lecturing done……………..

  7. — “…that would be the time to make a comment about the doctors own weight”

    That would be Doctor Tinkle.

  8. More than half of NHS staff are obese or overweight, contributing to a £5bn annual bill for the health service on conditions caused by obesity.

    Last week they were all queuing at food banks! Or is the obese half nicking the rations of the starving half?

  9. he is fined for bringing his profession into disrepute

    What does it take to bring the legal profession into disrepute? Necrophilia? 😉

  10. From my experience it isn’t the doctors and nurses at the sharp end who hector, its those public health non-jobs that are the problem.

    It would bother me if an alcoholic or overweight Doctor or nurse told me what the latest research said on the subject, as long as they left it to me decide whether or not I want to make a lifestyle change.

    It’s the hypocrites in public health who need introducing to hemp ropes and the nearest lamppost. Chris Snowden had a post up about one of those public health conventions and pointed out that at least one of them was close to the obese category.

  11. Recently took my 85 year old mum to the local inpatients and all the nurses were obese.I’m a bit overweight, but I actually couldn’t believe that anyone could get so fat.

  12. From my experience it isn’t the doctors and nurses at the sharp end who hector, its those public health non-jobs that are the problem.

    Dunno about Dorset but in the heathen wastes of the lands of the Sturgeon dictatorship, the non-jobbers get the nagging written in to the performance criteria for the sharp-enders.

    Who then, because incentives matter, become hectoring proxies.

  13. If they turned the heating down maybe the staff would lose weight.

    Rob said: “Lolz. The nannies nannied.”

    They should always be the first ones to be nannied, not the last. Lead by example. Practice what they preach. etc.

  14. Surely it’s a minimum job requirement to be fit enough to lift a patient out of bed. My step-mum was a nurse, she’s a tiny skinny thing, but could lift an ox.

  15. “Wonder what the punishment for breaching professional standards will be though…..”

    No choccie bikkies in the staff room? Or have they gone already under austerity?

  16. the Health Mafia want to lecture the proles about their health they damn better be paragons of virtue themselves, or its time to start turning the tables

    Good luck finding a new doctors surgery that will accept you if you try this though. Doctors tend to be somewhat thin skinned about having their own hypocrisy shoved in their faces, their receptionists even less so.

  17. ‘More than half of NHS staff are obese or overweight’

    They couldn’t possibly know that.

  18. > Surely it’s a minimum job requirement to be fit enough to lift a patient out of bed.

    Nah, orderlies and HCAs do that. Nurses might break a fingernail.

    > From my experience it isn’t the doctors and nurses at the sharp end who hector, its those public health non-jobs that are the problem.

    Quite. And if we insist that everyone in public health non-jobs be as fit as a fiddle, we’d merely end up having our rules written by teetotalling vegans. I’d rather have a lardbucket write the rules: at least the hypocrisy would be clear.

  19. Go to any nurses’ station in a busy hospital ward and you will see mountains of chocolates gifted by patients and relatives.

  20. More than half?

    I’ve never seen so many massive porkers as last time I was in an NHS hospital. And that was just the staff.

    Well I suppose 90% falls into the set of “more than half”, now I come to think of it.

  21. In fairness working shifts does bugger up meal planing and dieting so maybe they should provide better services for night shift staff etc.

  22. About the only part of the hospital where the staff are less fat than the patients is the waiting room for endocrinology.

  23. Glendorran,

    I never understand that. No-one goes and hands gifts to sewage workers for doing their job.

  24. It seems someone from the Nursing Midwifery Council reads your blog Tim.

    BobRocket
    January 8, 2017 at 12:39 pm

    All Public Health England employees with a body mass index ≥25kg/m2 should be summarily dismissed.

    UKAD should be put in charge of ensuring that all PHE employees (from the top down) comply with ‘Healthy’ activities to the same standard as publicly funded athletes, random testing to be performed and all employees to participate in the reporting regime.

  25. Every public sector dietician (they may have a new name now) I’ve encountered has been an obese lard bucket.

    Also, as others have said, much >50% of NHS employees I’ve seen in hospitals are fat/obese; females more-so than males.

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