Ecks? Ecks?

Philip Hammond is preparing to lead a battle within the government to soften Brexit by keeping Britain inside the EU customs union, The Times has learnt.

The chancellor believes that ministers must rethink their decision to pursue an entirely independent trade policy, according to several sources.

Start your purge gentlemen.

28 comments on “Ecks? Ecks?

  1. Corbyn can’t win. Against a real opponent with a real–I-want-to-actually-win-campaign he would have been up shit creek.

    BUT–Dress Up –the crazy fish-faced vapid cow certainly CAN lose and thus let Marxian tyranny in.

    What the fuck are these 1922 clowns playing at –allowing the dozy slag to install all this remainiac shite and then letting them run their gobs of to divide the Brexit vote.

  2. It’s taken us 45 years of entanglements to get where we are today; it’s going to take more than the allotted 21 months remaining to unwind it gracefully; the more so with an essentially infantilised political and managerial establishment who’ve kicked the hard stuff upstairs to Brussels all their working lives. We’re not going to get that fixed in any short order. Nor are we going to fix all the regulatory, non-tariff, aspects of trade in a span of months, even if we can get principle of continuity (as per the Czech velvet divorce) by default with the rest of the world.

    So long as the direction of travel is correct, if it takes a generation, then so be it.

  3. The Sage

    Anything is complicated for the sort of incompetent fuckwits who go into politics.

    The negotiations are really very easy.

    ‘We’re off, bye’ followed by ‘Do you still want to sell cars & stuff to us – let’s talk.’

    The politicians want to make out it’s complicated so that we will think they are actually achieving something. Many of us realised that was a fairy story years, if not decades, ago.

  4. To add:

    The language of international diplomacy isn’t French or English.

    It’s Bullshit.

  5. As my comment previously, the Remainers seem to be convincing the Tory party that the election result was from a rejection of hard Brexit.
    But it can’t have been, that position was known loud and clear before the election was called, and priced in to the 20pt lead the Tories enjoyed for months. Likewise austerity, such as it has been.
    Whatever the cause it emerged during the campaign.
    Poor manifesto?
    Campaign built round May herself, but without exposing her (sounds a contradictory strategy to me)?
    No social media campaign?
    But everyone is pushing their own alternatives to pre-election policy as the reason for the result.

  6. Our confused politicians are probably deluding themselves about the possibility of a ‘soft’ brexit. Never under-estimate the EU’s capacity to trigger a ‘hard’ brexit. The Fourth Reich has only two options in mind for the UK: unilateral surrender – leading to a semi-detached UK accepting all their rules and paying annual tribute – or punishment of the UK in order to deter any more bids for independence. Either way, no special deals for the UK. So a ‘hard’ brexit is the likely outcome.

  7. It woz the mannyfestoh wot dun it…

    Abolish the “triple lock” – and piss off your “grey” voters.
    “Alzhemer Tax” – ineptly managed – see above.
    General talk about tax rises – piss off anyone working.
    Keep foreign aid at the present levels – see above.
    Very soft on immigration control – piss off the working classes.
    And the one that I noticed seemed to have the greatest effect on the “soft tories” in social media – re-introduce fox hunting.

    Add to that, treating “Jezza” and his marxist cronies (and the BBC) with kid gloves and you have a car-crash.

  8. “The politicians want to make out it’s complicated so that we will think they are actually achieving something.”

    I think it’s actually the lawyers. There’s layers upon layers of stuff to untangle. Just saying “well unplug it all” isn’t going to keep the lights on, I fear.

    “So long as the direction of travel is correct, if it takes a generation, then so be it.”

    Quite. Slowly and surely is better than dipping your toes in, taking fright and running away.

  9. A reminder again: the Labour manifesto committed them to leaving the Single Market and the Customs Union. That’s why half the ex-UKIP voters went back to Labour. They thought a Clean Brexit was a done deal.

  10. “if it takes a generation, then so be it.”

    Except that the only generation which properly went for Brexit will be gone in a generation. The ones below have been saturated with anti-British propaganda all their lives and now have no idea what an independent country is.

  11. Just how would this ‘soft Brexit’ thing work? Haven’t the EU grandees been saying since before the referendum that it was all or nothing? Has anyone thought to ask the EU what they think about a soft option?

  12. Theo has it right, I reckon.

    All signs point to the EU simply dicking us around. If the reports about their non-negotiating strategy are even half true, no agreement is realistically possible short of unqualified surrender.

    “Soft” Brexit doesn’t look like a workable option, it looks like the fourth stage in the Kubler-Ross model.

  13. “A reminder again: the Labour manifesto committed them to leaving the Single Market and the Customs Union. That’s why half the ex-UKIP voters went back to Labour. They thought a Clean Brexit was a done deal.”

    Of course. Corbyn cant implement his loony nationalization program whilst were still in the SM.

  14. The problem with the Jack Hughes approach is that EU negotiators are civil servants, not politicians. They do not see their job as protecting trade and jobs (at the BMW plant in Germany etc), but as following protocol. And even if EU politicians, who may care about jobs more than protocol (although who knows with the Germans) were in charge there is the difficulty of getting them all to agree to an approach. Lastly, in a crisis there is a good chance that positions will harden on both sides, with an impasse amid mutual recrimination as a result.

    If I were to make a guess, we will get a deal of some sort which is virtually the same as being in the EEA, but with some concessions on free movement of Labour, in return for something else (possibly money). Quite possibly this will be more similar to remaining in the EU than joining the EEA proper. Anyway, such a solution will allow May (or more likely her successor) to claim that she has achieved the objectives of Brexit.

  15. Soft brexit is a chimera, a horse’s arse stuck to an ass’es head.
    It would mean taking all the same shit, but not even having a vote.

  16. There is a little bit more to international trade than just pitching up at Calais with a truckload of fridges. Why would we not want to stay in the customs union, for example?

  17. Free trade and screw customs unions.

    If Africans could sell their produce in Europe freely there might be a better future in their own lands to stop them fetching up here.

  18. Why would we not want to stay in the customs union, for example?

    Because being in the customs union means that we are not allowed to negotiate trade deals with anyone else – the customs union makes that an EU “competency”

  19. BiW – thanks for that. It seems that the key thing is a customs cooperation agreement. It would help if the media and politicians had the slightest clue about the EU structures. I would guess that Hammond made the same mistake as me.

  20. Why can’t we have a “Throbbing” Brexit or maybe a slightly “Squishy” One? When we don’t know what we are talking about it’s all so easy, call it what you will, never bother with defining what you mean and point and shriek for your option.
    In the real world, where NTBs will be our doom and you can’t be in “The Customs Union” without being in the EU (because it’s a union of EU Member States), forty years of entanglement cannot be undone in a moment (without much, much pain) and our dear MPs haven’t even a key stage one understanding of the subject we will likely be f**ked.
    Our only hope is a temporary safe haven, out of the EU and on the right path, by rejoining EFTA. See EUReferendum.com for well researched info. Or just point and shriek, your choice 😉

  21. @Diogenes. If you didn’t realise the customs union/free trade dichotomy and you’re here then what hope the seething masses who are fed sound bites and platitudes and microanalysis of feelings but nothing meaningful on the news except possibly Andrew Neil. How woefully ill informed is your average voter?

    I think the single issue referendum was actually brilliant as it exposed people to the arguments and issues for an extended period rather than the snippets they normally get.

    Maybe we should have more of them?

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