Is realisation beginning to dawn?

So money is not an issue. Let me be absolutely clear about that.

A shortage of building materials may be.

A shortage of skills might be as well.

And both will be constrained by our desperately conventional view of how houses must be built.

But let’s be clear: if you asked me for the money to build these houses and if I was in the Treasury I promise I could deliver it.

So, err, printing the money doesn’t solve the problem, does it?

22 comments on “Is realisation beginning to dawn?

  1. You know where his train of thought is leading him don’t you?

    Stage 1: I can print all the money I want, therefore I can have all the resources I want

    Stage 2: But maybe printing lots of money doesn’t mean I can have all the goodies I want, because of shortages of resources.

    Stage 3: Therefore in order to have all the resources I want I must be in control of all resource production and allocation.

  2. “And both will be constrained by our desperately conventional view of how houses must be built.”

    So what is the unconventional way – the one that doesn’t require building materials or skills?

    Asking for a friend…

  3. It’s funny that phrases like “let me be clear” and “there can be no doubt” are reliable signals that there is in fact doubt and lack of clarity in the speaker’s mind.

  4. If money is being invested in assets which produce a yield several times the cost of the money, then money is not the problem anyway.

  5. @AGN

    Separate issue to the quantity of materials required, but I understand that some other countries use rather more advanced home-building techniques at scale, that make construction less labour-intensive. But switching to more advanced techniques (which seems to be what abandoning “desperately conventional” ones would imply) would require new capital and new skills, so hardly a quick fix.

  6. He’s actually going to use his experience of ignoring all past work in the field of economics in a whole new area – he’s going to ignore thousands of years of building experience and produce a whole new way of building houses. Anyone who thinks he’s deluded is, candidly, talking neo-liberal nonsense

  7. AGN, MyBurningEars,

    “our desperately conventional view”
    -> see yesterday’s convo about “shibboleths”. It’s just Spud leaping into yet another field of which he knows nothing.

    He’s probably been watching the episode of Blue Peter Grand Designs where they build Grenfell Tower out of matchsticks.

  8. ‘And both will be constrained by our desperately conventional view of how houses must be built.’

    So he’s against regulation?

  9. “And both will be constrained by our desperately conventional view of how houses must be built.”
    No. The people who build homes would like to use all sorts of unconventional designs & materials. But the the British house buying public has a preference for the sort of house very small children draw with their crayons.So that’s what gets built.

  10. @BiS: Remember that “the sort of house very small children draw with their crayons” tend also to be the sort of house that lasts quite a while, is reasonably simple to maintain and (important point this) keeps the water out.

    ” unconventional designs & materials” have a bit of a history on all those points.

    Also note how many of those achingly fashionable architects actually live in thatched cottages or old rectories…

  11. @BiS – also note how many of the buildings designed by those achingly fashionable architects turn out to be not fit for purpose – libraries that amplify and echo the sound, houses that leak or fall to pieces (or in the case of Frank Lloyd Wright, both), offices that don’t work as business spaces, fire stations that are so crap they get converted into art galleries (Hadid) etc etc etc

    to pinch Sowell on socialism, modern flagship architecture by superstar architects “in general has a record of failure so blatant that only an intellectual could ignore or evade it.”

  12. Bongo said:
    “Maybe the Snippa is thinking about modular techniques, hardly new though”

    They tried that here before and the scrotes nicked all the bath and kitchen fittings while the place was half-built. One advantage of traditional build is that the perimeter is secure before the more portable expensive bits go in.

  13. “AGN

    “And both will be constrained by our desperately conventional view of how houses must be built.”

    So what is the unconventional way – the one that doesn’t require building materials or skills?”

    Fuck only knows for sure but I seem to recall one his Circle-Jerk Buddies banging on about modular huts made out of recycled copies of old tax manuals or something.

    It was easy. Houses could be built in a day for sixpence by a cub scout. Strangely the C-JB hadn’t actually set up a company to do this but as he’d written a letter about it to the East Sussex Gazette, that was proof enough.

  14. 3D printing houses?
    Build from different materials?
    Build one or two bedroom terraced houses with no garden en masse.

  15. “It’s funny that phrases like “let me be clear” and “there can be no doubt” are reliable signals that there is in fact doubt and lack of clarity in the speaker’s mind.”

    And the speakers should be treated with the same disdain as those who declare that something “stands to reason” or is “common sense”.

  16. Borrowing the money from banks which make it up is not going to solve the problem either.But there is a solution: jump off the Brexit cliff ( You don’t have a choice now, I’m afraid)

  17. We’ve tried modular buildings several times and the companies that make them have gone bust because nobody except local authorities doing slum clearance wanted to buy them
    Why? Because there are still lots of people around who can remember Attlee’s pre-fabs, so pre-fabricated (aka modular) housing has a bad name in this country.
    Some of the Tower blocks built under Wilson were modular – a lot of the Tower blocks have been demolished as being incapable of being made “fit for human habitation”.

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