Piss ups and breweries come to mind

The absence of the ability to organise them that is:

The Government’s austerity policy descended into chaos today as Downing Street suggested it was ready to abandon a 1 per cent cap on public sector pay rises, only to insist hours later that the cap remained in place.

The “U-turn on a U-turn” was blamed on the ongoing “war” between Theresa May and Philip Hammond, after the Treasury reportedly demanded a retraction of the announcement. It led to speculation that the Chancellor had been intending to claim credit for the policy change at his next budget.

Three Cabinet ministers appeared to have been briefed that the pay cap was coming to an end as they openly talked about the need to consider lifting it, and Sir Oliver Letwin, the influential backbench MP, even went into detail about how taxes would have to be increased to fund it.

Why not actually have the balls to speak the truth?

Everyones’ wages have gone down, why shouldn’t public sector pay stand still?

17 comments on “Piss ups and breweries come to mind

  1. What is it with May? Did she study Gordon Brown & Ed Miliband as role models? She seems to have entered office on a mission to destroy the Tory Party.
    And they’re still promoting her as a strong & capable leader.

  2. If you’re 600/euro a month job in Poland has been replaced by a machine ( thanks, convergence subsidies paid by GER and UK ) and you come to the UK and fill a £1200 a month vacancy, then your income has gone up.
    But you’ve brought the average down in the UK.

  3. Why not actually have the balls to speak the truth? Everyones’ wages have gone down.

    That’s precisely why. If it isn’t talked about, everyone quietly assumes that the reason they haven’t received a pay rise is because they just haven’t been working hard enough. But if they discover that nobody is getting a pay rise, they’ll look to blame the government.

  4. There is no u-turn on a u-turn. Nobody suggested the government was “ready to abandon a 1 per cent cap on public sector pay rises”. It’s just a stunt made up by the Labour Party and fed to the media, who eagerly jumped on it because it fits their current “Theresa May is weak and doomed” template.

    Laura Kuensberg said as much on Andrew Neil’s show yesterday.

  5. Then May’s weakness is in the fact that fuckwits like ZaNu are outspinning them.

    Outspun by fuckwits like Jezza & McNasty.

    Because May is thick useless shite.

    Hit back now.

    Socialism has murdered 150 million human beings –so far. It’s time that message went national.

    Its time that Jezza’s love for Chavez/Maduro and the Jezza/McNasty =Chavez/Maddo parallel was put in the publics notice.

    The fact that Jezza and that crook Sanders both ran peddling shite very similar to Chavez’s poison promises to the Vene-mugs should also come up.

    And the likely fact that J & McN once voted in would never allow themselves to be voted out again.

    All of those could equal a start on the fightback. Plus punishment for BBC bias etc.

    But from Dress Up the rest is silence.

  6. Letwin playing games does not count as a policy u-turn. I heard him on Today. He was very unspecific on all of it, including tax. Bit of mischief making by those who are in the business of stirring it up.

  7. Are public sector workers leaving? Is there a shortage of people signing up for nursing? OK, STEM teachers, but we have specific incentives for them.

    Sure, nurses want a pay rise. News at 11: people want more money. Doesn’t mean they deserve one.

  8. > OK, STEM teachers, but we have specific incentives for them.

    There’s a £15,000 one-off grant for STEM students who want to enter teaching, but I’m not sure that’ll make much difference. Besides, teachers aren’t leaving because of the poor pay; they’re leaving because the students are horrible. Independent (private) schools aren’t struggling to recruit, despite often actually paying less than the public sector.

    > Are public sector workers leaving?

    Plenty of nurses train here then leave for Aus/NZ. GPs are retiring early; paramedics are apparently in short supply too. You’re right that nursing vacancies are being backfilled by increasing the number of training places. There’s no similar action for GPs though.

    There’s no shortage of firemen, police officers, tube drivers, council busybodies, civil servants, etc. Personally I’m not tempted by the salaries on offer in the civil service, but they’re good jobs for working mothers, what with their family-friendly hours, generous maternity leave, and relaxed sickness leave.

  9. It’s astonishing that Metro – owned by the Mail Group – was pushing this claim. Do these people want a Corbyn government in the belief it will boost advertising revenue?

  10. If public sector employees are demanding pay rises while private sector employees’ pay is stagnating, why not pull a grand wheeze and tie public sector pay to private sector pay?

  11. jgh,

    > why not tie public sector pay to private sector pay?

    No. You can’t win by playing their game.

    It’s whack-a-mole. No sooner have you knocked their pay into line, than they’re complaining about conditions. They’ll demand 35-hour weeks; more holidays; paid leave to raise their children / look after their parents. They’ll demand free travelcards, better coffee, and a desk next to the window.

    They’ll also moan about how you calculate the pay increase. If a Grade 2.3 retires and is replaced by a Grade 2.1 on lower pay but doing the same work, doesn’t that count as a decrease? But my annual non-performance-related increment shouldn’t count, because reasons.

    In general it’s never a good idea for a politician to make spending or taxation promises. Osborne regretted the pensions triple-lock almost as soon as Cameron announced it. Hammond got caught out trying to tweak National Insurance rates for the self-employed, because the manifesto had promised no tax rises. There’s no point tying your hands: voters don’t believe you anyway.

  12. “It’s astonishing that Metro – owned by the Mail Group – was pushing this claim. Do these people want a Corbyn government in the belief it will boost advertising revenue?”

    We’ve been there before on this. The current journalist cadre are uniformly university educated graduates in ignoramus studies. They’re a product of the system & have very little in common with either their readerships or the supposed political flavour of their titles. Hence pretty well every paper is like reading a reprint of the Guardian. All that’s left (or more properly, faintly right) is a fading number of columnists.

  13. @bloke in spain, June 29, 2017 at 6:54 am

    What is it with May? Did she study Gordon Brown & Ed Miliband as role models? She seems to have entered office on a mission to destroy the Tory Party.
    And they’re still promoting her as a strong & capable leader.

    I’ve said before May is more left-wing than Blair and his partner Mandy. May studied Foot – hence workers on boards; Gov’t Industrial, IT/Digital, AI and Housing strategies – all areas Gov’t should not interfere in.

    Mission to destroy the Tory Party? Yes, May made that clear when she told the world the Conservative Party is the nasty party.

    May is as strong and stable as jelly.

    However, we’re stuck with her due to idiotic GE2017 – if she fails/falls Corbyn will transform UK into a western Cuba/Venezuela.

  14. “However, we’re stuck with her due to idiotic GE2017 – if she fails/falls Corbyn will transform UK into a western Cuba/Venezuela.”

    I’d say that’s highly unlikely. Is there any example of a fully developed country like the UK descending into a socialist mire? More likely, before it has a chance to head far into a Venezuela direction, there’ll be a lashback. There’s too many vested interests to protect. The State may look strong, but it’s built on sand. It’d need it’s army & its police, but could it count on them? Would the rank & file copper & squaddie enforce socialism at gunpoint.
    More likely a “strong man” will arise. A leader. A Fuhrer, if you prefer. The future’s not bright. But it’s not likely to be red, in the long run.

  15. That’s what’s so hilarious about Corbyn atGlastonbury. Does he realy think that bunch of snowflakes (far out man) has the makings of a revolution? Only while democracy is on his side. The revolution’s on the football terraces & in the pubs sell a lot of lager. It wears big, heavy boots just right for crunching skulls.

  16. However, we’re stuck with her due to idiotic GE2017 – if she fails/falls Corbyn will transform UK into a western Cuba/Venezuela.

    This must be some other definition of “western” I’m unfamiliar with.

  17. This must be some other definition of “western” I’m unfamiliar with.

    I think that is the familiar although somewhat dubious use of “western” in a political sense (i.e. 1st / 2nd world) rather than in a geographic sense.

    Although, you can tell something about the disaster that is Latin America in the 20th & 21st centuries by the way they have all (pretty much? Any exceptions?) dropped out of the 2nd world in to the 3rd …

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