Standard British lefties

The culture of Britain’s youth faces being “shaped and defined” by American giants such as Facebook, Amazon and Netflix, the BBC fears, as it announces major investment in children’s television.

The BBC has confirmed it will invest £34 million in expanding digital programming for children, as it attempts to win their attention in a changing online world.

In a speech to staff, Lord Hall, the director-general, will spell out how the BBC must “reinvent” its offering to its youngest audience in the coming years, moving beyond television programmes to become a serious rival to “global media giants”.

Those septics, coming over ‘ere an’………

They’d not complain in the slightest if an Italian or French series became a hit. But Americans?

40 comments on “Standard British lefties

  1. So the BBC has an inalienable right to brainwash our children. My opinion of Lord Reith has gone down.

  2. The BBC was set up to prevent (radio) broadcasting becoming a private monopoly in an age where only one channel was technically feasible.
    That age is long gone, as the BBC tell us when complaining about their competitors.
    The BBC is obsolete.

  3. All the Beeb has to do is look at Canadians. They’ve been exposed to “American Cultural Imperialism” since the dawn of recorded history. Has it made them one bit smarter? Has it made them one bit more energetic? Has it made them one bit richer? (Actually yes, it has. The last one anyway. But they are too damned stupid to recognize that.)
    All those years, exposed to American exceptionalism, French culture and British traditions and their vocabulary is still limited to: “Sorry, eh?”

  4. “Your children are being brainwashed by those evil American corporashuns! Quick, let us brainwash them instead! Look how benevolent we are!”

  5. Its kind of funny, them complaining.

    After the decades of hit British shows becoming so popular over here that they even get local remakes.

  6. “Pat

    The BBC was set up to prevent (radio) broadcasting becoming a private monopoly in an age where only one channel was technically feasible.
    . . .
    The BBC is obsolete.”

    *One* radio channel in a market area was never a limitation – as seen in both the US *and* the UK. The BBC was obsolete before it even came into existence.

    And, sadly, to prevent private monopolies they tried to set it up at a public one – which, as bad as someone might think private monopolies are, is even worse.

  7. And yet the British left apes their idiotic American counterparts at every opportunity, even if it makes no sense at all (e.g. the very white and bourgeois UK version of Black Lives Matter)

  8. Since Brexit they’ve gone full on BBC.

    Gallons of lefty agitprop, tons of fuck the Tories, disabled people on every show and advert and now, this morning, I hear I’m going to be subject to some Gay Britannia celebrations.

    At least their showing a bit of diversity, I suppose, otherwise it would be the normal shit, antiques, food and property.

  9. Shut the BBC down. Gone in a week. Compo only for low-level staff–techs, tea ladies etc.

    The Boss class walk out the door with nothing.

  10. Ah the marketplace of kids eyeballs and the attached brains. Why can’t people admit that unless you were abused, isolated or very deprived you basically just want your kids to turn out better versions of yourself. I only have to remind myself how many mickey mouses, how many monkees, how many scooby dos, champion the wonder horses, zorros, lone rangers, rocket mans, flash gordons, harold lloyds i and millions of Britons watched to be intensely relaxed about kids these days watching stuff that originated in North America.

  11. Trying to remember how many of the programmes I watched as a kid (as opposed to a small kid, when Playschool was de rigeur) was actually from the UK. Very little sticks in the mind – all the good cartoons were either US or broadly French (with English dialogue obviously…), and the wierd ones were from God knows where.

    And I watched BBC mainly (ITV never had the good stuff – it was much more UK-based). Funny how the world changes – I am sure if I check the CBBC listings they are now totally free of US cartoons etc.

  12. What Thomas Fuller said.

    Missing out on the odd bit of live sport is a small price to pay.

    The harassment, on the other hand, is a different matter. I do make clear to people that they will regularly be sent threatening letters and may have nosey thugs turn up at the door.

  13. The BBC has used this same argument that they must be competitive in every sphere to suck taxpayers’ wallets dry for decades. They need to be told to fuck off.

  14. moving beyond television programmes to become a serious rival to “global media giants”

    Well they could move to a subscription model similar to those media giants and get rid of the tv tax for starters.

  15. Sure, the contamination of youth from American TV over the decades has been so awful, from Bonanza and Dragnet to Game of Thrones and Rick and Morty.

    Yet the British contribution and particularly that of the BBC has been what exactly? Dr Who? Nope – no longer of interest given the Welsh / Diversity bollocks pushed increasingly since the relaunch.

    Poldark and Sherlock? Meh, alright I guess, if you like that sort of thing, but not exactly Breaking Bad is it?

    The problem of the BBC is that since the licence fee is effectively a hypothecated tax (most, but not all of which funds the BBC), they are insulated from their subscribers, whom they by and large treat with contempt.

    Certainly the editorial style would have much less lefty bias and a much more populist basis if it were subscription or advertising based than today.

    The problem with subscription or advertising based revenue is that it would be much less than the roughly £3.7 billion raised in TV License revenue each year.

    Until the TV License is replaced with direct subscription, meaning encrypted digital channels for everything except public service broadcasting, the BBC will continue to treat those paying the TV License with contempt.

  16. Watchman

    “(as opposed to a small kid, when Playschool was de rigeur)”

    Jeez, You must have a precocious kid.

  17. ‘Public Service Broadcasting’: a term coined in an era of one TV channel and still used today.

    The remit to “entertain, educate and inform”, set in the era of one news broadcaster but still declaimed today, in an era of mutiple broadcast news outlets.

  18. I think this is more the BBC trying to protect their market share than problems with the imported content; as far as I can see Netflix is almost as buttock-clenchingly ‘progressive’ as the BBC.

  19. The BBC would be complaining if it was the French and Italians, but they aren’t a threat.

    In fact, Netflix/Amazon is pretty much a global thing. The Crown and Outlander are both made in the UK by lots of British people (and Outlander is far better than any costume drama the BBC have made in decades).

    The problem the beeb suffers from today is that their whole thing is making a certain sort of bland, middle-of-the-road show to please a wide audience and tick a load of boxes. This used to work just fine when they were the only provider, but you’ve now got competition which is grabbing bits of it, because they’re making more diverse stuff.

    Now, very few people are interested in a show about the historical accuracy of movies. Most people would probably hate that. At best, the channel supplying those gets 1m views worldwide. But that doesn’t matter. Because maybe there’s a YouTube channel about crocheting that another 1m people like worldwide. Or maybe you like people blowing things up, or people who do bad lipreading of movies.

    Most of the people watching the BBC are people who are used to that pattern. The kids aren’t. I’d say mine watch one thing, Bake Off, and nothing else.

  20. If we privatised the BBC but kept the £147/year tax, how big a pay rise could we give to hard-working nurses?

    The licence fee raises some £3.5bn a year; there are around a million full-time equivalent workers in the NHS. That’s a pay rise of £3,500 a year per worker.

    Mind you, BBC programmes like Casualty and Holby City actively reduce pressure on the NHS by reminding people how terrible it is.

  21. “The licence fee raises some £3.5bn a year; there are around a million full-time equivalent workers in the NHS. That’s a pay rise of £3,500 a year per worker.”

    Thanks, but I’d rather spend my £147 on booze and strippers. If nurses don’t like the pay, they can give Foxies a ring about a job. Those girls really work for the money.

  22. “If we privatised the BBC but kept the £147/year tax, how big a pay rise could we give to hard-working nurses?”

    You’d have to find a way to identify them, first.

  23. @Tim Worstall

    They’d [BBC] not complain in the slightest if an Italian or French series became a hit. But Americans?

    Or German – one was The Singing Ringing Tree.

    BBC inflicted children with that horror story in 1960/70s.

    Side note: Sweden banned Skippy.

  24. My lot just watch stuff on their mobiles. Last time the TV was switched on must have been a couple of weeks ago.

  25. Sweden banned Skippy.

    Nope. I remember watching Skippy in not-so-sunny Norrköping back in the 1970’s as a kid.

    There were Swedish complaints about animal abuse, since the various scenes of 1,000 different “skippy’s” bouncing away from the camera’s (usually bollock laden males, despite Skippy being female), were created by releasing them from sacks, but that was a general issue.

  26. The Singing Ringing Tree wasn’t just German, but East German. That bloody dwarf gave me the willies.

  27. John Galt

    ‘Yet the British contribution and particularly that of the BBC has been what exactly? Dr Who? Nope – no longer of interest given the Welsh / Diversity bollocks pushed increasingly since the relaunch.’

    I Claudius
    Bridgehead Revisited
    The Jewel In The Crown
    Pennies From a Heaven
    The Singing Detective
    Edge of Darkness
    Our Friends In The North
    The Forsyte Saga
    Faulty Towers
    The Ascent of Man
    Civilisation
    The World At War
    The entire David Attenborough natural history stuff

    Pretty good once upon a time

  28. Think you should be a bit careful with that list; Jewel in the Crown was Granada, as was Brideshead. World At War was Thames.

  29. I’ve not had a tv license for years now. They sent lots of letters at first, then I phoned up and spoke to someone who seemed to actually understand the law. We had one visit (I was out, the wife showed them our setup, all streaming from the web) and no issues since.

    I probably pay more than the tv license between Netflix, Amazon Prime and picking up shows from Google Play from time to time, but at least I’m not paying the license fee on top!

  30. DuckyMcDuckface

    ‘Think you should be a bit careful with that list; Jewel in the Crown was Granada, as was Brideshead. World At War was Thames.’

    John Galt asked what the British contribution was

  31. @John Galt, July 4, 2017 at 9:43 pm
    “Nope. I remember watching Skippy in not-so-sunny Norrköping back in the 1970’s as a kid.”

    Thanks for correction. My source was a BBC (?) broadcast of a programme about Skippy/Skippys

    Claim was banned in Sweden as something to do with humanising animals.

    Mrs Pcar is Swedish and had never seen Skippy, so seemed plausible. You mentioning 1970s may explain – she was born early 70s.

  32. John P

    Fair enough; but would kids have been watching;

    Singing Detective, Edge of Darkness, I Claudius?

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