Doesn’t Dicktater just love democracy?

Or to put it another way, I am struggling to see a way out of the mess in any way but one, which is the only other option that I can think of. And that is that there is a cross party agreement on one issue, which is to seek a repeal of Article 50 and that the UK then turn its attention to dealing with our own issues instead of trying to disrupt the EU and world stage instead.

The people may have spoken but who gives a shit about them?

29 comments on “Doesn’t Dicktater just love democracy?

  1. If you think telling us that we cannot achieve peaceful change through the ballot box is a ‘way out of this mess’ then you are a fool.

    Does he know what happens when democratic change is impossible?

    I’ve tried to subtlety express this many times but here goes. People die.

  2. to seek a repeal of Article 50

    Do we think we know what he means or do we think he’s whistling through his navel?

  3. Can anyone remember – a few years ago I’d have described him as mildly Eurosceptic – regarded the EU as undemocratic, neoliberal etc.

    At the time of the referendum he was pretty much ambivalent (saw the argument both sides) but went for Remain on balance.

    He has now become a one eyed vocal supporter of the EU seeing no downside, and no upside for Leave.

    What has changed him?

  4. The EU is the one remaining body that takes him seriously. He is constantly giving them the benefit of his views

  5. Unfair Tim.

    Murphy loves “social” democracy, where (only) “right thinking” people get to implement their policies.

    I wonder why he doesn’t grow a little brush moustache.

    A major inconsistency in logic here:

    “repeal of Article 50 and that the UK then turn its attention to dealing with our own issues instead”

  6. With Ritchie, you always need to follow the money. From his blog:

    As from 1 November 2016 I am employed 3.5 days a week as Professor of Practice in International Political Economy at City, University of London. I am principally engaged by them to undertake research on the European tax gap, country-by-country reporting, BEPS implementation and related issues as part of a multi-university Horizon 2020 project funded by the European Union.

  7. Bear in mind that 53% voted for Obama in 2008, and a tad over 51% for him in 2012. Yet I don’t see those results getting the same attitude that a 52% vote for Brexit is getting. I certainly don’t remember anyone saying that the views of those who voted for Obama should be ignored in favour of the remainder who didn’t.

    Funny that.

  8. Fun facts, of the other two City academics, Ronan has been publishing with Ritchie for years and Anastasia advises the Labour Party on economic policy. They’re also husband and wife. But I doubt those facts had any bearing on his appointment…

  9. There is no mechanism for repeal of Article 50. We’ve said we’re leaving so we’re leaving. Of course, we can apply to rejoin, but the EU will not be agreeing to the various UK opt-outs and the rebate, we’ll have to rejoin as full on Euromites, committed to the EU project. Good luck winning a referendum on that.

  10. Doc,

    You think they’d have another referendum? They’ve learnt the lesson about asking what the demos wants and we didn’t give the right answer and as punishment we won’t be consulted again

  11. DocBud: There is no mechanism for repeal of Article 50

    Well no, and that’s what I was driving at above. Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty obviously can’t be repealed by one member state unilaterally and it simply provides for a member state to give notice to leave the EU which is what the UK did.

    Once the process has started, can it be reversed by the member state requesting to withdraw the notice it has given under Article 50? I’m sure that theoretically it can because no bending of rules is so tortuous that the EU couldn’t accommodate it.

    That said, the UK referendum result was ratified by both Houses of Parliament before Article 50 notification was given so it’s surely inconceivable that the notification will be rescinded.

  12. As an aside, I will be taking the train to Norfolk tomorrow and as part of the journey will stop in Ely. It looks a nice place if you’re a mentally ill single man with increasingly fewer days of lucidity.

  13. That said, the UK referendum result was ratified by both Houses of Parliament before Article 50 notification was given so it’s surely inconceivable that the notification will be rescinded.

    It comes back to that point about the British constitution (nebulous though it is), whereby one parliament cannot bind future parliaments irrevocably (something the EU never did understand), thus any bill passed by parliament can be repealed or superseded by a new bill similarly passed.

    Theoretically, the UK could issue a formal withdrawal of the Article 50 Notification within the 2-year period and if this is acknowledged by a qualified majority of the other 27-member states then the exit would be terminated.

    There is no EU legislation explicitly stating the above, but the 1969 Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties would seem to allow it to happen. Although most EU member states are signatories to the Vienna Convention, not all are (France and Romania for instance), but I think it would give the necessary veil of legitimacy if both the UK and the EU required it.

    Fortunately they won’t, since a withdrawal of Article 50 Notification by the UK government would be an act of political suicide.

    If you think telling us that we cannot achieve peaceful change through the ballot box is a ‘way out of this mess’ then you are a fool.

    As the old saying goes:

    Liberty rests on the four boxes:
    -The soap box;
    -The ballot box;
    -The jury box;
    -The cartridge box.
    Please ensure that they are employed in the right order.

  14. Jim, the US presidential system has never been about how many votes by common voters someone gets. Its solely on how many electoral college votes are got in December.
    So not the same thing at all – a president candidate could get 80% popular vote or 20% popular vote and not be elected president either way. Its just the electoral college.

    The UK referendum was won by one side. Doesn’t matter about the percentages, they got more than the losing side in number of votes.

  15. Perhaps he could be the fixer who fixes this cross-party ‘agreement’ (or elitist double crossing of the electorate) because he is so universally liked and admired, and hence finally achieve the much longed for Vermine?

  16. Paul

    “Fun facts, of the other two City academics, Ronan has been publishing with Ritchie for years and Anastasia advises the Labour Party on economic policy. They’re also husband and wife. But I doubt those facts had any bearing on his appointment…”

    Thank you. The Augean Stables of academe desperately need cleansing of such apparent corruption. Bring on the Ecksian Purge.

    Bravefart

    Apart from the Cathedral, King’s School, Cromwell’s house and pubs like The Cutter on the river, Ely’s a dump. The Poet’s House is a good hotel, though, with stylish bar.

    John Galt

    Thank you for that.

  17. @Martin: I know how the US presidential election works – my point was Obama won the US election (regardless of the mechanics of doing so) with 53% and 51% of the vote, and no-one said he was not a legitimate winner (tho plenty said Trump wasn’t a legitimate winner, despite him winning the electoral college by a big margin). Leave won the referendum with 52% of the vote (regardless of the the mechanics of that) and yet its victory is repeatedly derided as somehow an illegitimate result.

    Put it this way, if Brexit had been decided on an electoral college method, with a delegate from each constituency sent to vote Leave or Remain at a convention, Brexit would have won by a landslide as large as Obama’s – Remain piled up huge majorities in certain urban areas, while Leave had smaller majorities across a large geographical area. Do you think that would make the usual suspects any less likely to complain about the result and demand its overturning?

  18. “…UK then turn its attention to dealing with our own issues…”

    He seems to have conveniently forgotten that as part of the EU, “dealing with our own issues” is exactly what we are not allowed to do.

    That’s what it is all about, isn’t it?

  19. ” Do you think that would make the usual suspects any less likely to complain about the result and demand its overturning?”

    No, because they are liars. Whatever lie suits the tactics of the moment, use then discard. Primacy of Parliament; then when Parliament votes for Brexit with a majority of hundreds discard it. Rinse and repeat.

  20. “… I am struggling to see a way out of the mess in any way but one, which is the only other option that I can think of.”

    What is possible to Dicky Tater is what to his tiny mind is conceivable. But options analysis begins with listing every logically possible option, so as not to be limited to what is only ‘conceivable’ …

  21. Theo,

    Indeed, and it’s usually best with more than one person in the room and with those others from a diverse background and not sycophantic blog commenters.

  22. To claim that it’s receipt of an EU grant would be most unkind.

    I understand how you might think that.
    I couldn’t possibly comment.

  23. Was it mooted somewhere on this site that Taterknob is involved in a threesome with his academic colleagues? He is only acting true to form. On set, he never needs fluffing

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