Anyone seen this report by Tim Lang?

The Guardian doesn’t mention the name of it at all. Not even which groupuscule publishes it:

The government is “sleepwalking” into a post-Brexit future of insecure, unsafe and increasingly expensive food supplies, and has little idea how it will replace decades of EU regulation on the issue, a report by influential academics has said.

The study says ministers and the public have become complacent after decades of consistent food supplies and stable prices for the UK, something greatly helped by the EU.

Written by food policy experts from three universities, it is published on the day David Davis, the Brexit secretary, heads to Brussels for a second round of formal talks with the EU on departure arrangements.

Would dearly love to be able to scan through 88 pages of their misrepresentations…..

26 comments on “Anyone seen this report by Tim Lang?

  1. Hmmm. I was going to give them their answer in the comments, but the comments are turned off.

    The answer to “how it will replace decades of EU regulation” is: by incorporating all current EU regulation into UK law, which what the EU Legislation Repatriation Bill (or whatever it’s called) currently going through Parliament will do. Don’t the Grun’s political jurnos keep up with the political news at all?

  2. @jhg. In common with other leftist media, the Grun makes up its own news to suit the meme of the day. Facts are superfluous.

  3. Yes, I found that, emailed him. He’s on holiday. Emailed his suggested replacement contact, she works half time, not including today. The third in the try again process emailed it over.

  4. “The study says ministers and the public have become complacent after decades of consistent food supplies and stable prices for the UK, something greatly helped by the EU.”

    Is there actually anywhere in the western world that hasn’t had consistent food supplied and (relatively, at least) stable prices since WW2?

  5. If the authors’ quotes in the press release are any indication, the full report should be a joy to read…

    Professor Millstone said:
    “In the EU, UK consumers and public health have benefited from EU-wide safety standards, without which there will be a risk of the UK having less safe and nutritious products.”

    EU-wide safety standards are ©EU and will automatically self destruct despite the “Great Repeal Bill”.

    Professor Lang said:
    “UK food security and sustainability are now at stake. A food system which has an estimated three to five days of stocks cannot just walk away from the EU, which provides us with 31 per cent of our food. Anyone who thinks that this will be simple is ill-informed.”

    The EU will tell the UK: You vant foot, Britischer pig-dog? You ken vissle…
    …or buy it from us because we need to sell it, same as before.

    Professor Marsden said:
    “The UK’s food system already faces unprecedented challenges on environment and jobs – we see real dangers that these are already being dislocated by Brexit uncertainties.”

    And we’ll have all our eastern European workers back please, right away.

  6. I love how the left/remainer bloc get their knickers in such a twist thinking that leaving the EU means that the UK will make it illegal for them to continue buying their foreign grub.

    ‘Ere. D’you want some nice boloney? Chunk ‘a brie? Special import. Yours for a fiver, an’ I’m doing you a favour, mate.

  7. Is there actually anywhere in the western world that hasn’t had consistent food supplied and (relatively, at least) stable prices since WW2?

    No.

  8. Isle of Man, Jersey, Switzerland and the 6 other non-EU territories in N/W Europe must be food hell-holes, unstable prices and inconsistent supply.
    I’ve only been to IoM and the prices were high, but they were consistent

  9. ‘Food policy experts,’ desperately trying to find relevancy.

    Better than EU Legislation Repatriation Bill, just let it go. A sign that decades of external control was wasteful bullshit.

  10. In the EU, UK consumers and public health have benefited from EU-wide safety standards, without which there will be a risk of the UK having less safe and nutritious products.

    Being over the age of 5, I’m old enough to remember when half Britain’s ready-meals were found to contain the meat of unwanted Romanian horses.

  11. As an expat living in Australia, I find myself veering between deep depression and indescribably hilarity (at least indescribable to my wife) when I read articles like this and the thousand other doom and gloom prognostications on Brexit. I know there are many differences between the UK and Australian situation, but Australia has not had a technical recession for 25 year, by some measures among the wealthiest per capita nation, all WITHOUT being a member of any economic, political or social bloc of any actual meaning to its prosperity. Few people die of food poisoning because of the absence of EU directives. The UK – far more sophisticated in economic, financial and entrepreneurial ability – should be so grateful and so excited at the huge opportunities in the wider world and the 93% of the world’s population not under the iron heel of EU bureaucrats

  12. Again, and again, and again and again, the final conclusion from all this, if it is true, is that this country has been appallingly badly run for 25 years. If our food supplies, economic prosperity etc. etc. are dependent entirely on our continued membership of the EU, then we no longer have any control over this country’s future.

    The EU is not stable politically – we know that it wants and needs further powers to move forward. We know too that it won’t distinguish between members and that it will never give back powers once it has them. We also know from Lisbon that we can’t trust our politicians to take the short-term flak to defend this country’s interests.

    If these arguments were marshalled to advocate EFTA or something then it might not be so bad. But we’re essentially being told that past policy has infantilised us to the extent that we can never depart from it, but also that this is the wise governance that the foolish referendum has taken us away from.

  13. @ Tim Newman
    Being over the age of fifty-five I am old enough to remember that there was absolutely zero chance of eating Romanian horsemeat.
    That was before we joined the EEC.

  14. “that this country has been appallingly badly run for 25 years.”

    Yes, but you miss the problem. The problem is that it is “run.”

    Restore freedom. Let the people run themselves. Get government out of people’s lives.

  15. Whenever UKIP claimed that 70%+ of our laws were passed in Brussels those the organs of the deep State (BBC and Guardian) would fall over themselves claiming it was nothing like that and most of our laws were made in UK.

    So WTF are they now telling us that we need a great real bill to get EU law on to our statute books and if we get it wrong we’re all gonna die?

  16. I don’t think that anyone here really realizes the seriousness of the study. As an american, I don’t have the EU regulations to protect me and my family. I recently bought some bananas that, to my shock and horror, had too much curvature! The looks of disappointment and fear on my children’s faces was almost too much to bear!
    Actually, typing that was almost too much to bear.
    Disclaimer: Bananas were the first thing I thought of, but I did a google search to make sure of the regulation. Lo and behold one of the first hits was a TW article in Forbes from May 2016 on the banana curvature regulation. The minor satire did not have to be bananas, however, it could easily have been Parmesan cheese from Wisconsin, and so, according to the EU, not really Parmesan cheese at all; or many other reg.s that are too numerous to mention.
    Dropping the EU regulations will, of course, cause the price of food to drop and the supply to expand. And put the academics behind the study, whose bread and butter is Moar Regs! out of work. Any regulations that actually do good may be re-introduced by parliament.

  17. Howard

    ” all WITHOUT being a member of any economic, political or social bloc of any actual meaning to its prosperity”

    Well, I could point out that it is the junior partner of CER, without that there wouldn’t be half a million Kiwis in Aussie doing all the good jobs.

  18. john77

    “@ Chester Draws
    Berlin
    IIRC there were two airlifts to supply food to West Berlin”

    Was there actually a shortage of food through? The airlift, run mostly by the UK and US without the support of the EU prevented any actual shortage. It seems to me to be proof that if there is a potential problem, the UK has a history of acting before everyone starves to death.

  19. Aren’t they also always bleating on about the current rise in use of foodbanks, which appears to be happening whilst still in the EU?

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