Quite rightly, her sentence is longer than that of the man jailed on her lies

A woman who made a series of false rape claims and sexual assault allegations has been jailed for 10 years.

Jemma Beale claimed she had been seriously sexually assaulted by six men and raped by nine, all strangers, in four different incidents over three years.

The 25-year-old was found guilty in July at Southwark crown court of four counts of perjury and four counts of perverting the course of justice.

The Metropolitan police said one of the rape allegations made to police by Beale in 2010 led to the conviction of a man, Mahad Cassim, who was jailed for seven years.

After the CPS and his defence team were alerted to the fact there were serious doubts over the validity of Beale’s allegations, the man subsequently appealed against his conviction and it was quashed at the court of appeal in July 2015.

Good.

No, not because it’s about rape, or false claims, or feminism, but because it’s perjury. The system simply does not work if people will lie to the courts.

And yes, we do go after rich white men too. Both Jeffrey Archer and Jonathan Aitken served time for it.

Good.

32 comments on “Quite rightly, her sentence is longer than that of the man jailed on her lies

  1. You can’t but wonder if all of her lies are just ploy to get men who wouldn’t have gave her a second look sympathy. As it is she deserves getting 40 years. 10 for each lies.

  2. Its miscarriages of justice in these sort of circumstances that make the death penalty so wrong, Execution is irrevocable.

  3. The Groan uses a favourable close-up which hides her ‘best’ features.

    A full photo would allow you to see her in all her glory.

    But independently, how the police managed to miss the obvious is truly amazing.

    ‘Scuseme officer, they’ve gone and raped me again for the fourth time.’

    Dots….join up!!

  4. And how many women, I wonder, have been sent to prison purely because a man lied under oath? Must be that patriarchy I keep hearing about.

  5. There was some woman on from some government resource centre or other being interviewed on the radio and saying that the most concerning fall-out of this case was the possibility that women who had been raped might not come forward to the police or that they might not be believed.

    And there was I thinking the most concerning thing was the impact on the men falsely accused, one of whom spent two years in prison.

    The woman went on to say there was already a problem because they knew that such false allegation cases were ‘vanishingly small’ and that many women who ‘had been raped’ did not report it.

    I wondered how she knows for a fact that these women who don’t make a report had been raped?

    I wondered if the ‘knowledge’ that false allegations are ‘vanishingly small’ in number helped convict the man who spent two years in prison?

    However, these questions didn’t seem worth asking by the interviewer.

  6. Yes, I heard that too, AndrewC, and the radio very nearly went through the window (again). But we must remember that if you believe you’ve been raped then you have been raped – that’s how justice is meant to work in the 21st century, isn’t it?

  7. Isn’t this woman gay? I’m sure I heard she was living with a female partner?

    I suppose it might be that she’s a bit thick, and making up stories about sex attacks to contribute to the lesbian “all men are bad rapey pigs” schtick.

    Be interesting to find out what the thought process behind charges being bought against the men was.

    I also note that the maxim ‘better a guilty man walk free than an innocent one be jailed’ doesn’t seem to come into play much nowadays…

  8. Kevin Lohse,

    A miscarriage of justice is an argument for sorting out the police, the legal system and the judiciary, not the system of punishment.

    Quite simply, if at 20 you are put in prison for 20 years, you are essentially screwed. For example, what job do you get, what educational qualifications can you have, what has it done to any pension, what are your chances of having a family life, or even coming out not partly insane?

    Besides, can you name anyone executed because the victim believed they had been murdered, or lied about it in court?

  9. Alison Saunders and the rest of that Marxian-femmi- gang(up to and including Trasher May) are the ones needing 10 year sentences.

    I am second to nobody in wanting Marxian feminist evil utterly smashed and the females involved in it personally and individually punished.

    However 10 year sentence for being a lying nutcase are likely to do little more than ensure lying nutcases will stick ever more desperately to their lies rather than admit their crimes.

    I think a lifetime of irksome and enforced/ supervised therapeutic and social/ community work commitments ( under circs where no more false accusations would be credible eg in camera) would be a very unpleasant alternative to jail but without boost to stubborn denial-of-crime that jail will likely provoke.

    The alternative I propose is, after all, attention albeit of a negative sort.

  10. If the number of such cases are “vanishingly small” why are they always popping up in the media? Not doing a good job of ‘vanishing’…

    Isn’t this the same CPS which submitted doctored evidence at a sexual assault trial a year or so ago? Speeded up CCTV footage to try and get a man convicted? Was in Waterloo station, I think.

    Anyone fired/prosecuted over that?

  11. Saunders rules the CPS and Saunders was a creature who enjoyed the full support of “Conservative” bitch May’s Home Office.. Still does. The same May under whose so-called watch occurred both Yewtree and May’s own jump the (Great White) shark moment of Vietnamese epiphany in the HoC.

    Crimesex indeed.

  12. “Excavator Man

    I have no idea what you are trying to say.

    The system of punishment is very much part of the legal system.

    Are you saying it is better to executed than receive a 20 year sentence? Given the choice I would choose the latter.

    Quite what the last sentence means I have no idea. But I wouldn’t be surprised if misanalysed evidence taken from a body had at some point led to a murder conviction. In fact I’m pretty certain that DNA evidence has overturned murder convictions based on earlier forensic techniques. So one could argue that the evidence given by a dead body turned out to be false.

  13. “Its miscarriages of justice in these sort of circumstances that make the death penalty so wrong, Execution is irrevocable.”

    Imo, she deserves the death penalty.

  14. Cases of false accusations which hit the headlines might be ‘vanishingly small’ but there are many others quietly shuffled out of sight.
    There were at least two different cases very close to me where there was a big local media fuss about sexual assaults in broad daylight. There were vivid details about the attacks provided by the police (from statements by the “victims”, no doubt) and appeals for information. Then quiet descended for a few weeks. Then a little footnote that basically neither incident had happened.
    If it wasn’t for the fuss in the local press initially I suspect that there would be no mention of the cases being dropped at all and I don’t doubt that this has been the case when there has been no publicity.
    Spread across the country the true numbers of false accusations must be staggering.

  15. @JF: “There were at least two different cases very close to me where there was a big local media fuss about sexual assaults in broad daylight. There were vivid details about the attacks provided by the police (from statements by the “victims”, no doubt) and appeals for information. Then quiet descended for a few weeks. Then a little footnote that basically neither incident had happened.”

    I’m doing my best collecting these stories!

  16. The longer Alison Saunders endures the more I am convinced she is one of the most dangerous people in Britain. The Purge should begin with her.

  17. Besides, can you name anyone executed because the victim believed they had been murdered, or lied about it in court?

    Not recently in the UK, since we’ve given up the death penalty, but a big factor in the abolition was…the execution of Timothy Evans based upon the false testimony of a known and convicted offender, namely John Reginald Halliday Christie.

  18. Isn’t that capital punishment point the low rhetorical trick that Americans refer to as “Look, squirrels!”

  19. Is “Wasting Police Time” still an offence and can the police themselves be charged with it?

  20. However 10 year sentence for being a lying nutcase are likely to do little more than ensure lying nutcases will stick ever more desperately to their lies rather than admit their crimes.

    Which pretty much describes the case Tim mentions as well:

    Lawrence Henderson, defending, said Beale still maintains her innocence, and she was considering appealing against sentence.

    He told the court: ‘Ms Beale stands by the claims she made in this matter and if she had her time again she would again plead not guilty to these matters and contest the trial.’

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4818874/Jemma-Beale-jailed-10-years.html

  21. AndrewC and John Galt, please read exactly what I said.

    Yes, for me, I’d rather be dead than incarcerated for 20 years. Not that it would matter much at my age, but I know precisely what a wrongful life sentence would have done to me earlier in life.

    The point is that we are supposed to have a legal system that prefers the guilty to walk free than the innocent to be punished, and the cases brought up time and time again are cases where it was obvious that the conviction was dubious. If higher standards had been applied, had the police not been corrupt, had the judge not misdirected the jury and so on. As for Timothy Evans, there are still conflicting views, and I don’t have any view on something I have only read about via Wikipedia. What I do know, however, is that the Drummer Rigby murderers were undoubtedly guilty, and I would have liked them to be executed. However, we live in a world where they are not, but a Brazilian electrician can be gunned down without anyone being punished. Didn’t he get a death sentence without a trial?

  22. As most of those she accused weren’t white it should have been classed as a hate crime and the punishment doubled.

  23. I just did an ‘internet search’ for the person in question…..

    Good grief. Filed under the category: “That once seen, cannot be unseen.”

    I wouldn’t, not even with that of my worst enemy.

  24. I showed the story headline with my wife and only then revealed the picture. Shock was evident. That anyone could think that anyone would want to have sex with such a creature is surprise enough, that anyone would want to have sex with such a creature forcefully is shocking. If it is about power rather than sex the fact that anyone would want power over someone who clearly has so little self control and power over their own appearance rather than someone attractive with power over men in the old fashioned way is unthinkable.

    The angle missed in discussion here is the idea that has been promoted – all women are beautiful no matter what they look like – there are no objective standards of beauty therefore the creature mentioned above is as beautiful as Heidi Klum or some other gorgeous example of womanhood. If that were true then the free market would have found out and used, err, cheaper more plentiful normal people in adverts rather than one of the beautiful ones. I blame the patriarchy… but in which case if the patriarchy, aka men, are saying beauty means one thing then isn’t it extremely unlikely that a member of the patriarchy would even be able to get an erection over the antithesis of beauty his group push? Contradictions aplenty here.

  25. Both Jeffrey Archer and Jonathan Aitken served time for it.

    And Chris Huhne (though that was “perverting the course of justice”).

  26. Andrew again,

    I never buy this ‘its about power’s thing. You can give a woman a beating and get a lesser sentence.

  27. Bloke on M4
    August 26, 2017 at 10:44 am

    I never buy this ‘its about power’s thing.

    —————————————————-

    Agreed.
    Read a piece a while back which said that basically it was yet another case of there being an original “scientific” paper which claimed that rape was aprimarily about power. It showed little or no convincing evidence that this was generally the case but it was what a lot of feminists wanted to hear . It became the default position, not least because anyone even thinking of criticizing the dogma could kiss goodbye to their career.
    Where have we heard all this before (numerous times)?

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