We must elect a new people

At my suggestion, the school invited the charity Living Streets to come in and enthuse the children about walking or cycling to school. I attended the first assembly, at which one of their organisers spoke. She was lively, funny and captivating. With the help of a giant puppet, and the promise of badges if they joined in, the children went wild for her and for the cause. The school, led by its committed headteacher, has done everything it can to support the scheme.

For a few weeks, it worked. Everyone noticed the difference. No longer were cars mounting the pavement – and almost mounting each other – outside the gates. The children were using their legs, and families were talking to each other on the way. But the cars have crept back in, and now, though the clever and catchy programme continues, we’re almost back where we started: school begins and ends under a cloud.

Humans, eh?

30 comments on “We must elect a new people

  1. It’s cold. It rains. Kids drag their feet. Mums have other things to do. The car is convenient.

    Moonbat is a twat.

  2. ‘The teachers know how much damage traffic pollution does to their lungs, hearts and brains. They know that it reduces their cognitive development, their ability to concentrate and their capacity for exercise.’

    Presuming he actually believes this, he is an idiot.

    ‘The lack of regulation also creates social tension.’

    Freedom is hard on the people. Better they be strictly controled. They’ll feel better.

  3. ‘The teachers know how much damage traffic pollution does to their lungs, hearts and brains. They know that it reduces their cognitive development, their ability to concentrate and their capacity for exercise.’

    Have the teachers wondered what sort of society would regulate and mandate stuff like this at every level? What sort of control would that society exert over teachers, I wonder?

    That’s the problem with people who want the State to control people they don’t like – sooner or later the State controls everyone.

  4. I do have a little sympathy with the problem of the school run. Everytime though I try and think of a solution which doesn’t involve a significant amount of fascism I come up with a blank. Obviously that’s a feature for the Moonbat. The science about the damage being done to children is very weak though, as alluded to by a previous poster, it’s just a useful stick to beat motorists into submission. Sad Dick in London has just announced most new office buildings and new homes will have no private car parking. Can’t let the people have mobility.

  5. Ian Reid – “Everytime though I try and think of a solution which doesn’t involve a significant amount of fascism I come up with a blank.”

    Punish criminals. Parents do not like their children walking or riding to school because of the chance they will be kidnapped, raped, or murdered. Or if it comes to that, set on by large thuggish older children.

    This is why parents will never agree to their children walking for long:

    Dutroux was convicted in 1989, for the abduction and rape of five young girls (with his then wife Michelle Martin), the youngest of whom was eleven years old. Dutroux was released after serving three years.

    Your daughter could be kidnapped and raped and all the State thinks she is worth is about seven months.

  6. The damage caused by the diesel engines that the likes of Moonbat and the Greens espoused as a solution to the evil CO2 is something that we do not talk about enough. The evil Greens backed the European car manufacturers campaign to spread diesel, which was why diesel incurred lower car taxes iirc. And it is diesel exhaust that is a major problem for lungs etc.

  7. Dirty air is killing our children

    To which the obvious rejoinder is: no, it fucking isn’t.

    We’re not living in Mumbai or Taiyuan. I’d bet a round pound that air quality is actually better now than when I was a boy, when car engines were much dirtier, everybody smoked like a chimney, and lots of folks still heated their houses with coal.

  8. The children were using their legs, and families were talking to each other on the way. But the cars have crept back in

    Sounds as though the families all worked out what each other was like.

  9. At our local primary it seemed that most of the children who were old enough cycled to school in early September. When the cold weather came numbers dwindled. There was a social stratification: it was the spoiled working class brats who arrived in cars.

  10. Re air quality I remember back in the 90’s when amazing claims, such as the IQ of children will rise by 5 points were made, about adopting lead free petrol. I wonder if any studies were done which measured what the impact of this measure really was. It seems we hear a lot about problems being caused, but never hear what changes were wrought by the measures taken to combat them, before the circus moves onto the next thing to ban.

  11. @Ian Reid,

    Well it must have. Just look at the number of kids (and percentages of the total) getting A at A level and going to University! There’s proof if you want it, despite IQ-deniers saying it’s only because the standards have been debased.

  12. What exactly is the problem that we’re trying to solve here? Not air pollution, as Steve pointed out. Too much traffic? No, it’s only a short window of time. Kids being run over? Lack of exercise? The character-building benefits of being picked on by bigger kids while shivering in the cold and/or rain?

  13. Co-incidentally, WUWT had a piece this morning titled Does Air Pollution Really Shorten Life Spans? pointing out that in places such as Delhi and Beijing where air pollution is the worst, life expectancy is longer, and growing faster, than in the supposed cleaner areas of their respective countries.

    It’s almost as if the prosperity brought about by cheap, reliable energy sources has a bigger impact on life span than the, (largely modelled), problems of air pollution.

  14. It’s easy to fix car run problems in the morning… make enough space for the amount of cars that will actually turn up… not the imaginary amount on a hot summers day if everyone lived within 100 meters of the gate… problem solved…

    If we want more people to walk / cycle to school then we need to fix the british weather first…

  15. My local school has banned cycling to school, in case they are sued for any accidents. And while we are at it, if it is such a good idea, how about starting with teachers not driving to school? I’m sure they’d be over the moon with that suggestion.

  16. The children were using their legs, and families were talking to each other on the way. But the cars have crept back in

    Sounds as though the families all worked out what each other was like.

    Or people prefer to mingle in their community at particular times and before 9am on a weekday morning sure as hell isn’t one of them.

  17. Kevin B

    The WUWT piece just says air quality is important, just not as important as not being dirt poor. In the UK, getting rid of the crap produced by diesel engines would be beneficial. We should just move back to normal petrol cars.

  18. “And it is diesel exhaust that is a major problem for lungs etc.”

    No, it’s not. It’s not even a minor problem.

  19. “Action is warranted to reduce even very low environmental Pb levels to reduce the developmental burden of Pb on children.”

    Plumbumphobia.

  20. There’s a hypothesis that part of the huge reduction in violent crime in the last three decades is due to lower levels of environmental lead. No idea if its true.

  21. @dearieme, November 29, 2017 at 1:28 pm

    At our local primary it seemed that most of the children who were old enough cycled to school in early September. When the cold weather came numbers dwindled. There was a social stratification: it was the spoiled working class brats who arrived in cars.

    It’s the same here now. Those at Public [furiners: private] Schools use bus/walk/cycle in all weathers. Also snow doesn’t close them.

  22. As a Yorkshireman I’ll continue the theme:

    In the winter of ‘63 when I was 6 we had a 1 mile walk to school and I’m pretty sure we wore shorts.

  23. I walk a mile across the fields into school with daughter, whatever the weather. Have done since she was 7. And I make her carry all her school kit.

  24. Gamecock – “Plumbumphobia.”

    If Keith Vaz suffered from that he would be in Parliament to this day.

  25. @ BiND
    At St Bees School in Cumberland all the boys wore shorts all the time and it was presumed, by those of us lucky enough to study elsewhere, to be colder than Yorkshire. It closed down a couple of years ago because the number of pupils was no longer enough to be viable.
    I completely believe that you wore shorts in 1963 – they were standard wear for pre-teens. One cannot play soccer after school with one’s mates in long trousers.

  26. John,

    “– they were standard wear for pre-teens. One cannot play soccer after school with one’s mates in long trousers.”

    Cheaper and easier to patch self repairing knees than to have to keep repairing or replacing trouser that have been ripped at the knees as well.

Leave a Reply

Name and email are required. Your email address will not be published.