Err, yes, this might well happen

The shutdown of the North Sea’s most important oil and gas pipeline system on Monday was compounded by an explosion at a major processing facility in Austria, which is the main point of entry for Russian gas into 
Europe.

After the incidents, wholesale gas prices hit their highest level for six years, rising by more than 50pc in the space of 24 hours, raising fears that the increase will be passed on to customers.

You know what? The people who will shout loudest about this intermittency will be those who insist that our entire energy system should be intermittent.

Can’t you just see Caroline Lucas practicing in front of the mirror already?

22 comments on “Err, yes, this might well happen

  1. “This week’s “perfect storm” of problems will raise questions about the UK’s energy security, said Malcolm Graham-Wood, a veteran energy industry advisor.

    He said the gas crunch is an “entirely predictable” result of the UK’s creaking infrastructure and Government’s bungling energy policy.

    Mr Graham-Wood blamed the Government for its “short-sighted and ridiculous” decision not to invest in new gas storage facilities. The 32-year-old Rough storage facility off the coast of Yorkshire was forced to shut earlier this year. “

    Another triumph for May!

  2. If only there were domestic sources of natural gas – on dry land, perhaps locked up in the rocks or something.

  3. Another triumph for private school economists( Don’t do anything the market will provide) Europe is dependent on Russia for energy.Come on kiddies keep warm by chanting ,”We’re gonna take back control!”

  4. So Violet Elizabeth Reed, do enlighten us as to how Corbyn and McDonnell will make us less dependent on Russia for energy?

  5. Energy policy is full of government interventions – no coal, more wind, taxes to support green energy, subsidies for nuclear. Complex planning approvals.

    To then claim that the system is regulated on the basis of “the market will provide” is something of a non sequitur. Government policy seems to be designed to raise prices and ensure insufficient capacity. Much of this stupidity is the green nonsense coming from the EU of course. So it is possible that leaving will at least have the potential to improve matters.

  6. DNR

    It’s the climate and green eco-freaks (which included call me Dave) that drive higher costs, not private school economists.

  7. JuliaM,

    Why should the government provide gas storage, when the private sector is better-placed to know supply and demand? Centrica owns the Rough storage platform (which is in fact still operating, closure is a few years away yet). If you think gas storage is a profitable activity, feel free to buy it off them.

  8. Believing in a ‘free’ energy market in any European country is like believing in ‘the banks are not regulated and can do what they want’ (my leftie friends) and in the tooth fairy.

    They are so over-regulated and manipulated by politics (not the tooth fairy) that the system itself causes far more problems than would otherwise happen. Long-term don’t even think about.

  9. DBC Reed

    Pleased about Trump then? Going for energy security and no foreign dependence. Could do it in Britain. And here in our little corner of Spain, according to my former sources at the EVE (The Basque Energy Agency) we have gas locked up under Subijana (a pass through to the Rioja area where a lot of other good stuff is for sale) that could make us very happy.

    Can we go for it? No, because fracking.

  10. Ken – actually the most damaging eco-loonery was entirely home grown – Microbands fucking idiotic Energy bill, passed in parliament almost unanimously.

    Not all this lunacy emanates from Brussles.

  11. Much of this stupidity is the green nonsense coming from the EU of course. So it is possible that leaving will at least have the potential to improve matters.

    Yarp.

    Never misunderestimate the ability of the failed lawyers, subsidy gobbling cashwhores, and washing machine repairman-impersonating chemsex manlove enthusiasts in Parliament to make our resource-rich country energy-poor.

    But the Green Squid definitely has its thicker appendages in Brussels, the home of organic, carbon-neutral, biodegradable, solar-powered wanking.

    The EU regulates everything from atomic fuel rods to plant emissions to what sort of kettle we proles may use in our own homes. Even where their rules are sensible, they exist amidst a managerialist hellscape of overweening bureaucracy, bad incentives, false premises, and astroturf NGO’s paid to oppose economic growth.

    And we have plenty of that at home.

    We should just build a bunch of coal-fired plants, classify them as mosques, and the authorities will lose all interest in trying to regulate them.

  12. So, – not much pressure to fix these things and reconnect if the price rockets adequately?

    As for Lucus + chums I don’t see many of them publish their energy usage stats – more the shame that the shrill harridan isn’t smart metered-up on a wind and solar full fat no subsidy (fully intermittent) tariff.

  13. “We should just build a bunch of coal-fired plants, classify them as mosques, and the authorities will lose all interest in trying to regulate them.”

    That’s one solution..

  14. Have you read the stuff posted above Reed?

    It more than destroys your leftist cockrot but we never here back from you to defend your bullshit opinions.

    Because you are just a fatuous troll running your gob as a pathetic attempt at very low level annoyance.

  15. As posted elsewhere yesterday

    That Express Story

    [1] But global energy markets are already reeling from the news the North Sea’s most important oil and gas pipeline system was being shut down after engineers discovered a widening crack.

    [2] The shock shutdown propelled the global oil price to two year highs of over $64 a barrel over fears of a potentially major supply disruption for Britain’s remaining refineries.

    [3] The 100 mile long Forties pipeline transports 450,000 barrels of oil every day, or 40pc of the North Sea’s oil, including the crude that prices the global Brent benchmark.

    1. An oil and gas pipe

    2. Not quite, Brent Crude price increased to the high, WTI Crude price increased a bit with the spread hitting a high.

    3. Oh, where has the gas gone?

    Journalism today: where gullible, illiterate, innumerate, ignorant meeja studies graduates publish lies & distortion.

  16. ^ Ha ha ha, yes. Yes it was. Those of us that are left have just about got used to its current price.

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