How excellent

Mr Hulot, who last summer announced that France will outlaw the sale of all petrol and diesel vehicles by 2040, has a Land Rover he keeps at his holiday home in Corsica, a 30-year-old 2CV, a Peugeot, a Citroen, a Volkswagen camper van and a BMW.

Running old vehicles is actually pretty good for the environment. As you’ve not demanded a tonne or two of new steel in the new vehicle (s).

But isn’t it excellent that we get to hear about M. Hulot’s holiday arrangements?

24 comments on “How excellent

  1. Well, he can personally only drive one vehicle at a time. And if they’re used by others, they substitute for them having their own vehicles. So as far as their carbon footprint is concerned, it’s neutral.
    But that’s absolutely no reason not to flay a politician on the wheel of public concern. Let the lash descend long & hard. No doubt there’s plenty of other thing’s he’s a hypocritical cvnt over.

  2. It emerged last summer that Ms Pénicaud had made more than a million euros in a single day by selling shares whose value soared due to a redundancy programme she oversaw while working for the global food giant Danone.

    But she’s a socialist so nothing dodgy there, nothing to be concerned about – only right-wingers make colossal sums of money shafting the working classes. She is caring and compassionate.

  3. If the sales ban is to apply only to new vehicles, M Hulot’s fleet should appreciate in value quite nicely.

  4. Already have TMB. A good condition Deux-Chevaux might make 5 grand & a split-screen VW camper north of 15, in original condition.

  5. Particuarly this bit:

    “He is clumsy and somewhat naive of the evolving world around him, but still has a friendly, well-meaning, and good-natured persona. His escapades usually involved clashes with technology and the problems of living in an increasingly impersonal and gadgetized world.”

  6. BiS – that’s quite true and even the humble deudeuche is worth good money as you say. My 1959 MGA is also worth more than the £375 I paid for it!

  7. I’m not sure what this story is about. The ban on petrol and diesel cars wasn’t ever going to apply to the ruling class, was it? It’s just us plebs who will have to walk everywhere.

  8. “Can we not now build cars out of recycled steel?”

    Recycling is justified for the rare or expensive. Steel is neither.

  9. Today’s governments have no say on tomorrow’s governments, any more than the government of 1994 could ban the sale of such vehicles today.

    It’s virtue preening.

  10. “Recycling is justified for the rare or expensive. Steel is neither.”

    A Guardian-worthy level of inaccuracy.

  11. In Nantes a couple of weeks ago, I spotted a nice and shiny Renault 4 with new-style French plates (i.e. post-2008) even though they ceased production in the 90s. Perhaps an import? Anyone with local knowledge satisfy my satiable curtiosity?

  12. It emerged last summer that Ms Pénicaud had made more than a million euros in a single day by selling shares whose value soared due to a redundancy programme she oversaw while working for the global food giant Danone

    I can’t see any one-day spikes in Danone over the past five years, so I suspect the “one-day gain” represents a one-day sale with an accrued gain over some holding period (unless she held a large enough position that a 1-2% gain represented 1M Euro).
    In any event, what of it? – the program was implemented, it was public knowledge, and it had the desired effect – at least on share price, and possibly on operating results. It’s not like selling just before disclosure of an adverse event, or material transaction.

  13. 2040? Ha ha. Answers on a postcard: what will automotive technology be like in 22 years’ time and how fatuous is it to pass laws without knowing the answer to that question?

  14. @The Meissen Bison, December 18, 2017 at 12:04 pm

    MGA is a good looking car.

    My 964C4 has more than doubled in value since I bought it.

    For the record: 3 cars and 2 MCs.

  15. In Nantes a couple of weeks ago, I spotted a nice and shiny Renault 4 with new-style French plates (i.e. post-2008) even though they ceased production in the 90s. Perhaps an import? Anyone with local knowledge satisfy my satiable curtiosity?

    It’s been replated, possibly so the plate matches the region of the owner. This used to be compulsory I think, but isn’t any more, but there are advantages: nobody in the provinces wants a Paris plate because people will assume 1) you’re a tourist and 2) a twat. Accessing stuff like the local rubbish tip is easier with a local plate, too. That would be my guess, anyway.

  16. Thanks Tim, I thought it must be something like that. But I thought the new Froggy plates were non-geographic (though you can still stick your département number on the end, for old time’s sake).

Leave a Reply

Name and email are required. Your email address will not be published.