Those Vietnamese nail bars

The investigation began when police, immigration officials and staff from the charity Unseen visited nail bars in Bath in February 2016. At the Nail Bar Deluxe premises, in the city centre, they found two Vietnamese girls working on clients’ nails.

It emerged they were working 60 hours a week. One was being paid about £30 a month while the second was not paid. They were staying at the four-bedroomed home of the owner, Jenny, in Bath. One lived in a tiny room, while the other slept on a mattress in the attic.

Should this happen? No, of course not. But it’s a hell of a long way from 100,000 being prostituted through those Vietnamese nail bars, isn’t it?

36 comments on “Those Vietnamese nail bars

  1. If women didn’t exploit these other women by wanting their nails done then this wouldn’t happen.

    When will the Guardian print an article denouncing women for this?

  2. May was engaged in spreading CM femmi-propaganda when she vomited her nonsense in the HoC. Because she is well-off, MC/CM , London Bubble scum

    As well as seeking extra authoritarian power over ordinary people–which is a constant feature of her political “career”. And perhaps shows the hand of her global elite buddies.

    I have a suitably ironic punishment in mind for her. Ironic but not economic so to speak.

  3. How to explain the different conditions for the two nailistas?

    The only interesting part of this story is obscured by predictable tub-thumping.

  4. it certainly is a long way from 100,000 being prostituted through those Vietnamese nail bars.

    Article say hundreds or maybe a thousand!!

    There is some money in that game for sure, thats the reason they outnumber charity shops, serious the nearest 3 shops to me are all beauty parlours which must earn the bimbos £50 an hour for tarting about with fingernails and giving advice on exotic holidays in the Maldives

  5. One was being paid about £30 a month while the second was not paid.

    Purely a technical point – that’s not true.

    Accommodation and full use of, food, heating, and presumably clothes and all the type of stuff that would make them presentable in such a bar.

    Not excusing or condoning at all, just that “not paid” simply isn’t true. Lots of people struggling to make ends meet prioritise first off to manage those essentials. it’s what most of us did when starting out working on day 1.

  6. Jenny, Ken and Susan aren’t English at all but anglicised names for the Vietnamese nail bar owners.

    Before reading the article I did wonder who the “slave owners” were. Imagine my surprise on discovering the owners were not Geordies, Scousers or Cockney gangsters bundling young Vietnamese girls into shipping containers and bringing them halfway round the globe to work in nail bars for a pittance, but Vietnamese exploiting their fellow citizens. Must be one of the wondrous ways in which immigration contributes to the cultural diversity of Great Britain, you know that which the Grauniad constantly preaches to us about.

  7. “Rob

    If women didn’t exploit these other women by wanting their nails done then this wouldn’t happen.

    When will the Guardian print an article denouncing women for this?”

    Rob’s got a point.

    If it’s the punters who should be demonised over prostitution, why not the punters who use nail bars?

  8. Allthe etc.

    Since I have already typed “Middle Class” and “Cultural Marxist” about a million times already I don’t think it too large a mental leap to guess the abbreviation.

  9. AndrewC – that’s a very good point in theory.

    In practice I think we all know the answer. And you are a fully signed up member of the patriarchy for evening suggesting that.

  10. > One lived in a tiny room, while the other slept on a mattress in the attic.

    That’s standard student accommodation. In my 2nd year my room could barely fit a single bed and a wardrobe. But it was a two-minute walk from the lecture theatres, so I quite liked it.

  11. The teenagers were taken into emergency foster care but ran away. “Unfortunately, this is a common occurrence in trafficking cases, as victims are conditioned to feel reliant on those controlling them and compelled to return to them,” said Tucker.

    Oh really?

    The case was run as a “victimless prosecution” – more often used in domestic violence cases where the victim does not necessarily cooperate with the prosecution. “They are so conditioned to believe they are not victims. They didn’t see they had been exploited for gain,” said Tucker.

    Who has the right to judge that, if not the people themselves?

    There’s a notable exception to the ‘prevent harm’ part of the Harm Principle – that if people give informed consent to treatment that others may consider to be harm, their judgement overrides that of any third parties. For example, a doctor can perform risky surgery only with informed consent of the patient. A tobacconist can sell cigarettes to people only if they are able to give informed consent, knowing the harm they do. It’s their decision.

    A wrinkle in this case is that reportedly the kids were underage, and under UK law not deemed able to give informed consent. I suspect Vietnamese culture (and the girls themselves) may have a different view.

    The question in these cases is always: what was the next best alternative option, that made this seem like a good deal? There are essential details missing.

  12. ‘Police say it is the first time a successful prosecution involving children has taken place since the laws were brought in two years ago.’

    Slavery has been legal in GB until two years ago?

    Glad to see you people finally made it to the 19th century.

    ‘Donna King, service delivery manager for the charity Unseen’

    Service delivery manager? Wut?

    ‘The teenagers were taken into emergency foster care but ran away. “Unfortunately, this is a common occurrence in trafficking cases, as victims are conditioned to feel reliant on those controlling them and compelled to return to them,” said Tucker.’

    They are all totally unconcerned that this is the condition for Muslim women.

    ‘They were not locked up but had nowhere to go.’

    Just like when Lincoln ‘freed’ the slaves.

    So these girls can be sent back to the hellhole they came from and the Guardian can feel good about themselves for helping.

  13. NiV,

    > A wrinkle in this case is that reportedly the kids were underage

    No, they claimed to be underage. With no documentation, who can tell if a Vietnamese girl is 17 or 22? (Perhaps Tim Newman could, with his fascinating tales of ladies-of-the-night in Thailand.) Any police officer or Child Services officer will err on the side of caution, because they don’t want their name dragged through the mud if they get it wrong (as per Sharon Shoesmith and the death of Baby P).

  14. Nail bars? This can’t be a problem or at least not a big problem. Because for £40 a month they can come around to my place and clean my bathroom and cook me dinner. I would even throw down a mattress in the attic for them.

    Anyone know their agent?

  15. “Slavery has been legal in GB until two years ago?”

    Wasn’t it Jeffries’ Case (or summut) that ruled in 17something that English Common Law had no provision for legal slavery in England, condequently slavery has been illegal in England since the Normal Conquest.

  16. Multiple choice for an illegal immigrant caught in the UK. Do you;

    a) ‘fess up and get deported.

    b) scarper

    c) claim to have been illegally trafficked and forced to work in a nail bar whilst being raped so that the authorities give you a cup of tea, somewhere to stay, leave to remain and a sympathetic interview by the Guardian.

  17. “I would even throw down a mattress in the attic for them.”

    I knew, beneath it all, you were just a warm, fuzzy softie.

  18. Jgh, I cannot remember if it was Jeffreys, but there was indeed such a case, and a similar one in Scotland. Between them they established that slavery had not legal in Britain since God were a lad.

  19. I was wondering how the Vietnamese came to be such specialists at running nail bars, painting nails and people smuggling. It seems a bit random.

  20. @BiND

    There were some interesting articles on this last time I checked. Think originally it was via Vietnamese migrants to the USA who came across the industry then started specialising in it, setting up training colleges etc. Not dissimilar to the way Patels have become leading hotel operators over there. Worth a read about.

  21. @BiND / MyBurningEars

    Young Vietnamese travelers have iirc also become leading exponents of urban marijuana cultivation.

    I recollect several cases where the gardeners were deemed underage and the actual operators where nowhere to be found….

  22. Andrew C:

    The Authorities will offer you Option C if you haven’t already thought of it yourself. SOP in all such cases –to fake up “trafficking” figures.

  23. “Mr Ecks

    Andrew C:

    The Authorities will offer you Option C if you haven’t already thought of it yourself. SOP in all such cases –to fake up “trafficking” figures.”

    How can you be so cynical when it’s practically a proven fact that 5,000 trafficked sex crime victims are brought into the country every day whereon they are forced to work as prostitutes servicing 10 men every hour, 15 hours a day.

    Every time you say these statistics are nonsense, a baby seal dies.

    Do you want baby seals to die?

  24. Andrew C – you forgot to mention that 20 minutes after having their baby they have to go off again for another trick.

  25. The caption on the photo reads “The desperate plight of prostitutes in Hull…”
    Shouldn’t that read “The desperate plight of anyone in Hull”?

  26. Actually, interesting example of journalism, that article, PST.
    Despite having several photos & a video clip taken from a car driving around presumably Hull. Signally fails to show any actual prostitutes. Apart from one photo of police in conversation with a woman sitting on a street bench. Who certainly isn’t dressed in a manner likely to lead one to believe she’s a hooker.
    Since, if you wished me to give you a guided tour of streetgirls in London, I reckon I could find you a dozen or more very obvious ones within 10 minutes in the preferred working areas. Either the Sun journalists are remarkably incompetent or it’s yet another “fake news” story.

  27. Shouldn’t that read “The desperate plight of anyone in Hull”?

    Or the desperate plight of anyone reading The Sun, for that matter.

  28. Can’t be bothered to follow any of the links from these stories, as they will almost inevitably upset me, but these girls were living rent-free and all found? Shabby display of modern slavery, in my view.

    We have just one of these nail bars in my town (it’s only a quaint little town). Pass it every day. Had occasion to sue the ‘owner’ for a minor personal injury to a customer who, possibly needlessly, tripped awkwardly and hurt herself. He earned some grudging respect from me by having the balls to actually turn up and tell the blustering, vexed and indignant DJ to bugger off and that he had no intention of taking out liability insurance. Third world is as third world does, I thought; and I have spent many interesting and mostly enjoyable past years immersed in it. From time to time, butting up against real slavery.

    The shop’s still trading in its modest way five years later. The dainty girls on the front line don’t appear to be particularly oppressed, though appearances can of course be deceptive. Certainly, the local heffalumps are no more ravishing, despite their elaborately painted nails, untarnished as they are by anything even remotely resembling work.

    Mind you, I’ll agree I’m possibly not the best judge. Over the recent break, I watched again, for the first time since my impressionable childhood, the old black and white Christmas Carol movie, with the ever-excellent Alistair Sim; found myself thinking, contra the imposed narrative, that he wasn’t really truly that terrible to begin with. It was more Dickens’ maudlin and impractical guff and gloss that stuck in my reactionary throat. Bit like reading stuff in the Guardian or Independent, or frankly just about any of the recycling rags. At best, it’s all a fuss about nothing much. Most likely, it’s misdirection.

  29. Whatever happened to the places where you could get goldfish to nibble the calluses from your toes? Victims of climate change or emission standards?

  30. The people are conditioned.
    In other words they do not accept that there is a problem and those who consider themselves their betters will therefore say they have been conditioned.

    Here we call that ‘educating’. You condition your kids to not eat their classmates, you condition your kids to not stay up all night playing games, you condition your kids to behave, you condition your kids to come home after school.

    Who is to say they were conditioned or not? Would take weeks of testing to be sure, invasive testing even. 7
    Much easier to say children have been conditioned to act a particular way and the adults ‘managing’ the case do not like it.

    Perhaps the kids will end up among the homeless children. A few hundred or so of them avoiding capture by social services.

  31. PJF – “I knew, beneath it all, you were just a warm, fuzzy softie.”

    It is nice of you to say so. Because I was a little concerned about myself since I read that liking a gin and tonic was a sign of being a psychopath.

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