My word, this is excellent!

The new BBC series McMafia makes clear three things. First, that organised crime can still money launder, with the active connivance of the financial services industry. Second, it makes it obvious that tax havens are at the heart of this activity. Indeed, this is so much the case that they’re not the exception to global capitalism but are at the heart of that system

Really? A TV drama proves all of that?

I dunno, I’m going to have to go look up the murder rate in Midsomer Norton just to check that other show.

41 comments on “My word, this is excellent!

  1. Wow. Using a drama to ‘prove’ something is a new level of lunacy. Star Wars makes it clear we can levitate objects using the power of The Force.

  2. Dongguan – star wars tells us that robots are cute and we shouldn’t be concerned by them taking our jobs. Now the Jawas on the other hand, they may take our jobs. Not to mention the Hutts with their criminal enterprises costing other people money.

    Spaceballs on the other hand tells us that Dark Helmet is an idiot.

  3. ‘First, that organised (sic) crime can still money launder, with the active connivance of the financial services industry.’

    Organized crime turned off his spell checker.

    ‘Second, it makes it obvious that tax havens are at the heart of this activity [money laundering].’

    So it’s not the financial services industry, rather the tax haven wing of it.

    ‘Indeed, this is so much the case that they’re not the exception to global capitalism but are at the heart of that system’

    The heart of the system is tax havens. So ‘global’ (sic) capitalism is tax havens and money laundering.

    It seems that he has made the leap that off shore accounts are now ‘money laundering.’ And people no longer use the financial services industry, but tax havens.

    His lack of comprehension is stunning. That he is a teacher is an indictment of the system.

  4. CSI Miami shows that almost all the police in Miami are very good looking – almost like actors.
    Same for Rookie Blue and Toronto.

  5. His Vice – Chancellor must be one of the few people around who have not yet realised that he is in fact an idiot

  6. Gamecock

    To be fair to Ritchie, the English use an ‘s’ in their English, whereas the Septics use a ‘z’.

  7. Gamecock – in fairness I don’t think this is a leap – the reductio ad abusrdum of his philosophy is that the state is entitled to 100% of your income, and deigns to give you scraps from the table. Anything that facilitates people evading the state is therefore fundamentally ‘tax evasion’.
    I have seldom, even given the recent influx of morons to the pages of the Guardian seen any commentator extant in the mainstream media today with less knowledge of how Markets work than Murphy.

  8. Gamecock: I am prepared to tolerate your American spelling as long as you do not sneer at English spelling. Ritchie may be delusional but his spelling is standard. In the UK and colonies it is “organised”.

  9. Hear he has gone looking for an owl and a pussycat which have absconded with an untaxed £5 note.

  10. The North is overrun with zombies and is very cold; also there are some dragons somewhere.

    TV proves it.

  11. The vista of opportunity opened up by Murphy’s incisive analysis is simply breathtaking.

    Next up – interpretative modern dancing?

    Setting up parody account to mock the prat seems bound to fail.

    I’m troubled by the idea that there might actually be acolytes out there who are in a position to try and implement the sage’s remedies for imagined ills.

  12. For most commentators / pundits this would have been a fatal blow from the stupid stick – but we know Murphy is made of stronger stuff.

  13. English (GB) Language Pack by Mozilla added.

    “Gamecock: Bloody colonial commoner.”

    Don’t make me come over there.

  14. the English use an ‘s’ in their English, whereas the Septics use a ‘z’.

    Yes; but Gamecock is not wrong. Arguably, -ize is more correct than -ise for words derived from Latin or Greek. ‘Organizare’ is the Latin root here. We might write ‘evangelise’, but the Greek is ‘euaggelizo’. For words derived from French, arguably ‘-ise’ is more correct.

    In some respects, American English is a purer form of English.

  15. Theophrastus said:
    “In some respects, American English is a purer form of English.”

    True, but that still doesn’t make it right.

  16. I hesitate to contradict Theo, but Latin had no letter Z (except for a few Greek loan words). So the pedantic argument is that words derived from the Greek should take -ize, while those derived from Latin take -ise. Unfortunately for the discussion, the root ‘organ’ can be taken from Latin organum or Greek organon. FWIW my Chambers prefers organise, listing organize second.

  17. ‘First, that organised crime can still money launder, with the active connivance of the financial services industry.’

    Is he talkng about Government?

    Extortion and protection racket for the enrichment of those at the top and their servants and cronies.

    Mafia? Government?

    Hard to tell the difference.

  18. Chris M

    Latin had no letter Z (except for a few Greek loan words)”

    Not quite:
    The letter z was part of the earliest form of the Latin alphabet, adopted from Etruscan. Because the sound /z/ in Latin changed to /r/ by rhotacism in the fifth century BC, z was dropped and its place given to the new letter g. In the 1st century BC, z was reintroduced at the end of the Latin alphabet to represent the sound of the Greek zeta /dz/, as the letter y was introduced to represent the sound of the Greek upsilon /y/.
    See:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z

    So, arguably, Latin and Greek derivatives should take ‘-ize’ rather than the French ‘-ise’.

    the root ‘organ’ can be taken from Latin organum or Greek organon.

    Exactly. So, given your premise is false, arguably, we should write ‘organize’.

    FWIW my Chambers prefers organise, listing organize second.

    My 1970s OED insists that ‘-ize’ has precedence…But I’m less concerned with what is right here than denying that the American usage of ‘-ize’ is somehow wrong.

  19. From the thread on TRUK by one of his worshippers:

    ‘Pilgrim Slight Return says:
    January 4 2018 at 5:21 pm
    Richard

    There has been a tranche of people at work who have just left for better pay packets elsewhere and yours truly found himself promoted just over Christmas (despite the fact that I continue to look around too).

    Since my job is about developing and building affordable council homes I do hope you understand that I would love to volunteer for this task but I cannot as I now have to do my old job and my new strategic role too. There are now fewer of us here at work but at least we can chip away at the housing waiting list problem – albeit with what sometimes seems to be a teaspoon! By the end of this year we will have only managed to build 8 new council homes against a target of 40. Construction starts are also hopelessly delayed by other problems. We’ve got not none! I’ve got my work cut out I’m afraid.

    Best,

    PSR.’

    So – build 8 houses against target of 40 – get promoted. WTF is a ‘strategic role’?

  20. House style. This is a British blog so British house style should apply, organise, coloured people, pavement, standing for election, etc.

  21. Firefox won’t recognize English (GB) Language Pack. So I’ll keep challenging English/English spelling. Sorries.

  22. As I understand it, McMafia is being criticized because all the bad people are Jewish. As, presumably, pretty much all the Russian oligarchs are.

    I wonder if anyone takes that as proof?

  23. ‘Writers, exchange students, and businessmen and businesswomen need to be aware of these spelling differences when dealing with people in Britain and the US, because using the proper spelling for each country helps avoid confusion, and also lends that touch of professionalism that marks a true global citizen.’

    What if I don’t want to be a true global citizen?

    Is that like a true Scotsman?

  24. I now understand having watched “The Foreigner” last night that the true solution to the IRA wasn’t either the entire might of the British army, or political negotiations, but for them to be singlehandedly taken down by one hacked off bloke from China.

  25. “It missed aluminum”

    Bottom of the first link… The whole thing is slightly fluid in any case, as with any language. UK English mostly now uses “program” for example.

  26. I’ve read the book. It’s not bad. And it’s near nothing at all to do with offshore banking. Says the bloke who has had his own dealings with Russian Mafiya types.

  27. You have a blind spot, Tim. How else does the money move around? I don’t agree with most of the Murphy I’ve read, but the proceeds of crime needs the services that ‘offshore’ finance centres provide. It’s not brain surgery.

  28. My 1970s OED insists that ‘-ize’ has precedence

    OED house style is to always use -ize.

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