24 comments on “Fat ginger pikey is not a racist insult

  1. What if he’d called him a “tink” which was the word I knew as a child? Mind you, in those halcyon days they didn’t seem to be quite as loathed as they are now. Or maybe my parents just insulated me from the grim reality.

  2. I would defintely use the word “pikey” rather than didicoy.

    A bare chested fist fight at the Barking Smack pub on the golden mile at Yarmouth was an instant response to the word “didicoy”,

    It upset his brothers too ,who to be fair stood there without shirts on too and let it be a 1v1, i always remember him muttering the words “mary mother of jesus” whist battering him.

  3. Rickie said:
    “I would defintely use the word “pikey” rather than didicoy.”

    I thought didcoy referred to Romany gypsies, whereas pikey is a more general term for travellers, without connotations of ethnic origin.

    If your friend was an Irish traveller, he may have taken exception to your thinking he was Romany.

  4. David Evans, 34, complained that he was also referred to as a “jellied eel salesman” and “Gimli” the fictional dwarf from Lord of the The Rings

    One gets the feeling that the Times pre-reg preview is a teaser to even more insults that were flung.

    They’re recruiting

  5. If you called someone like the sort of sub-human scum who shit in the green spaces and shop doorways at Marble Arch, presumably this could avoid a potential prosecution on racial grounds?

  6. An American wouldn’t know what ginger pikey meant.

    An American might not know what a ‘pikey’ is and may mistake it for ‘piker’, which is another thing altogether. But ‘ginger’ has entered common use thanks to the Harry Potter films.

  7. Americans don’t understand English slang, fortunately. The first few HP books had to be translated for them until the need to publish simultaneously across the world took precedence..

    My favourite is the use of the word Berk, which Americans don’t know is abbreviated from Berkeley Hunt, itself rhyming slang for a rather shorter epithet (and with Berkeley pronounced phonetically and not as southerner ‘Barclay’!

    Harry Potter fans calling each other Snippas. Priceless!

  8. Didicoy is them that aint pure romany gypsy.

    It wasn’t me that fought a pikey, but a mate who shouted the fucking didicoys are smoking in the bar.

    It was an honest error on his part.

  9. tomsmith said:
    “Fact: it is not possible to be racist to white people”

    It is if they’re from a protected white group.

  10. “Sticks and stones will break my bones, but names will never hurt me.”

    Which I was taught at my (private) primary school in the 1950s — we even recited it as a group.

    No special treatment for ‘minority groups’. We were told that some of us would “go out to serve the fuzzy-wuzzies” – to bring them to Christ and civilisation.

    Happy days.

  11. Paul: my memory is of their women selling wooden clothes pegs door to door. But them I’m old enough to remember Onion Johnnies too. Different world.

  12. There’s too many syllables in didicoy for it to be a proper thrown insult, you’d have your teeth out before you got halfway through it. It sounds too much like specialist technical terminology. It needs to be two hard-consonant syllables, something you can launch from your throat with no invention of brain.

  13. I recall many years ago a UK newspaper article in which a case against a man for calling someone a “black bastard” was dismissed by the judge on the grounds that that someone was indeed black.

  14. @ Richard
    What white group is protected as a white group? As distinct from being Semitic – which isn’t a descendant of Japheth?

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