Logic, we need logic here

Why am I amused? Because every single one of those changes has got its direct or indirect (in the case of the diverted profits tax) origin in the tax justice movement. Candidly, you can find them all in here, from 2005.

To put it another way, the initiatives that are helping close the tax gap all started in civil society and not in HMRC.

So let me ask the obvious question, which is why isn’t civil society represented on HMRC’s Board?

Because if the changes happen without such representation then such representation isn’t needed, is it?

How much are HMRC board members paid?

11 comments on “Logic, we need logic here

  1. So let me ask the obvious question, which is why isn’t civil society represented on HMRC’s Board?

    Because it would be like asking a cannibal to consult on a tricky Tonsillectomy

  2. “So let me ask the obvious question, which is why isn’t civil society represented on HMRC’s Board?”

    A cynic might read this as:

    “So let me ask the obvious question, which is why am I not civil society’s representative on HMRC’s Board?

  3. There also a rather striking hole in the evidence that just because the tax justice network were talking about it doesn’t prove that internally (and privately obviously) HMRC were or were not also talking about it.

    I also thought HMRC was controlled ultimately by the exchequer and politicians who have been voted as the representatives of civil society.

  4. When someone (especially someone with political pretensions) feels the need to preface their every remark with ‘candidly’, it suggests that they’re not really being very candid.

  5. The problem with having civil society is that he expects it to be him.

    He’d scream like a stuck pig if someone from Taxpayer Alliance got the gig. Or that Toby bloke.

  6. If I may be allowed to discuss the proposition that The Novelist has adduced, it seems to me that civil society members can see good reasons why they, personally, should pay less tax, but for many of them, they cannot see why others should not pay more. This is particularly the case with those of a left-leaning political persuasion, who believe that tax should be used as an instrument to punish those they disapprove of.

  7. OK lets have someone from civil society on the board of HMRC.
    The London Mayor perhaps. Or how about rotate it for a year period between city mayors?

    That would put paid to any chance the insane one has of getting on the board short of joining the civil service and getting promoted.

  8. Everything Ritchie says is, obviously, stupid but I will point out once again that in the good old days, when you had a dispute with the government over your income tax return, it went to a panel of local worthies (mainly local businessmen) who sat in judgement on the question.

    If that is what he means by civil society I am all for it.

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