To fail Chesterton’s Fence

The EU is to oblige national governments to provide greater access to drinking fountains, encourage restaurants to offer free tap water, and raise the standards required of suppliers, as part of a move to clamp down on plastic waste and improve the health of Europeans.

Millions of Europeans, largely from impoverished groups, such as Roma communities in central eastern Europe, do not have ready access to drinking water. Yet analysis by the European commission finds that even where member states have a high standard of tap water fountains in public spaces and buildings are lacking, leading to an overuse of plastic bottles.

On Thursday the vice-president of the commission, Frans Timmermans, will announce changes to the drinking water directive to put further obligations on national governments.

More public drinking fountains then. OK.

But, erm, why did we stop having them?

In South Yorkshire, a spokesperson for Sheffield council revealed that all its fountains “were taken out a few years ago due to health risks and damage”.

I see, we’ve cracked that problem then, have we?

Well, we must have done, given that the law now says we’ve got to do again what we gave up doing because of that problem. Just be nice to see some evidence of it, that’s all.

16 comments on “To fail Chesterton’s Fence

  1. We voted to piss on the EU and their degrees.

    We now need to devote all our efforts to see off the FFC before she does the same to the UK by helping Jezza into power. Which seems to be the only rational appraisal possible of her fuckwit antics.

  2. Here’s a prediction: within a year of the fountains being installed numerous videos will surface of those who make our society diverse and vibrant using them to clean their arses. There’s already one doing the rounds.

  3. Frans Timmermans probably hasn’t noticed that Generation Snowflake people won’t even drink out of a parent’s or siblings glass.

  4. Millions of Europeans, largely from impoverished groups, such as Roma communities in central eastern Europe, do not have ready access to drinking water

    Assume, for a second, that this is true.

    Whose fault is it? Is anyone forcing gypsies to live a life of degraded poverty and parasitism, apart from other gypsies, perhaps?

  5. The European commission believes the new measures will reduce potential health risks associated with drinking water from 4% to below 1%.

    Are they saying that they’re happy with a 1% chance of getting sick from drinking water.

    Either I’m missing something here or the EU is third world.

  6. SS2:SoTP

    I think the point is not that the gyppos are destitute but that they are forced to litter the world with their Badoit and Vittel empties.

  7. So not only do I have to put up with f**king Gypsies in Britain’s railway stations, trying to lift my wallet and run off with any bag I leave unattended, I also have to pay so the f**kers can have a cool drink of water every now and then?

    My council, when I lived in London, chose not to close the public toilets, like the rest of London, because the homeless might want to use them. How is that working out? Now they need open air bidets too?

  8. Excellent, the UK has a distinct lack of public urinals these days. Glad they’re solving this problem finally.

    I would wager that the number of public fountains installed in the UK and not pissed in by drunk chavs will approach zero faster than Bitcoin’s value once the bubble pops.

  9. @ Tim
    We now have a reliable polio vaccine, so the worst problem associateds with piublic drinking fountains has been solved. but we’ll need an army of drinking fountain attendants to make sure they stay clean.

  10. There’s a market opportunity here. A drinking fountain that has two outlets: one for water and the other for TCP. Thus keeping the fountain nice and germ-free.

  11. Funny you should say that. When I was a lad we prepared our own bottles for carrying water when we went off for a day of tramping around. We tended to use old TCP bottles that we’d wrapped to protect them from bashes. I had thought the advantage was that TCP had such a strong taste that we’d be sure to clean the bottle thoroughly before use, but maybe the point was that a lingering bit of TCP would be useful if we refilled the bottle from a burn.

    When I arrived in Cambridge I found that the tap water occasionally tasted of something reminiscent of TCP. Eventually the water company drilled a new borehole. That cured the problem.

  12. The European commission believes the new measures will reduce potential health risks associated with drinking water from 4% to below 1%.

    Marvellous. Drink their daily and you’ll only get cholera or dysentery three times a year.

  13. Rob,

    Well apparently now it’s more than once a month at 4%! The rural backwater provincial ‘town’ I’m currently in in the Philippines has a better record than that (and better than what they want to achieve).

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