How about having a better NHS instead?

Victims of NHS blunders should receive smaller compensation payouts or the “staggering” costs of Britain’s negligence bills will bankrupt the health service, the Justice Secretary has been told.

Health service leaders have written to the Government, calling for cuts to payments for patients who suffer devastating injuries as a result of medical errors.

As has been discussed many times over the years, perhaps the first thing is to make the error reporting system more like that in aviation. Where the why and who is thoroughly worked out so as to become a warning to others.

More specifically, perhaps a change or two in midwife training. You know, less of the all natural stuff and woo hoo! to modern technology?

27 comments on “How about having a better NHS instead?

  1. They keep on getting things backwards. Business wants maximum output for minimum cost. Workers are cost. Amazon would’ve been foolish if they don’t figure a way to have the least numbers of workers doing what needs to be done. The company answers to their shareholders and maximize profit, not the betterment of the community.

  2. It’s the same kind of mindset that gives you folk who say its “wrong” to claim against the council for pothole damage to your car. Apparently it means “less money to fix potholes” if you do that.

    Of course, if the council has no interest in fixing the pothole in the first place, a few damage claims for new wheels, tyres and suspension components might focus the minds of the powers that be…

  3. @Rhyds, “there’s no such thing as society” comes to mind. As long as it’s “everyone’s” money which gets spent, no-one will mind. If you really want people to care, there own arses have to be on the line.

  4. I don’t think it’s possible to improve the NHS. Isn’t that what they mean by “envy of the world”?

  5. One of the few times I’ve disagreed with the late great Anna Raccoon. I’d like to see more NHS lawsuits.

    With the penalty coming DIRECTLY out of the pockets of the surgeons responsible.

  6. Aren’t most of these payments just the realisation of future costs needed to care for the person who suffered at the hands of the NHS which the NHS will pick up in the future anyway?

  7. We should make doctors supply their own medical negligence insurance with the standard rate paid as part of their salary. If they start collecting a lot of cases the market will soon weed them out.

    We would have to recognise that some procedures are inherently risky, but that’s not beyond the wit of man to sort out.

  8. @Julia

    (From memory) I think AR claimed that the amount of compo was unnecessary if the NHS could instead fix the problems they had caused, not that there shouldn’t be lawsuits or correct apportionment of blame. I’ll have a look at site when I get to a pc.

  9. If I were PM I would find it a tough job.

    In a case such as this my first inclination would be to wait til the next meeting of this crew and have a very nasty team crash in and beat the shit out of all of them.

    Off to the lovely care of the NHS they would go and I guarantee that they will get criminally negligent treatment.

    They then sue and I would fix it so that they won –and each receive a postal order for 7/6d with a lovely note of apology from the NHS.

    Unfortunately I would have to bonfire the Rule of Law to dispense equity as above and that dilemma is what would make being PM such a tough job.

    I think it might almost be worth it though.

  10. Victims of NHS blunders should receive smaller compensation payouts or the “staggering” costs of Britain’s negligence bills will bankrupt the health service, the Justice Secretary has been told.

    So the Justice Secretary is moving to make sure that it is cost-effective for the NHS to continue to kill people?

    There is so much that is wrong with this I hardly know where to start.

  11. The idea appears to be that the law should change so that victims of NHS bungling are short-changed.

    Perhaps proponents should set an example by forfeiting a portion of their salary.

  12. Slightly off topic. Needed the emergency department of our local hospital, earlier in the week. Damaged a tendon in my leg. Hurt like buggery & could have been a break.
    From crossing the doorstep to leaving. Including registering, triage, X-rays, consultation & settling the bill – 40 minutes.
    You’re stupid enough to put up with the NHS you get what you deserve.

  13. Perhaps negligence claims should be drawn against the future pensions of the staff and senior administrators involved? Pour encourager les autres.

  14. This is all nonsense. Compensation would only apply if negligence was proven, surely. Hasn’t the NHS, in all its glorious competence, heard of insurance?

  15. So Tim is now an expert midwife? How many babies have you delivered? How much do you know about midwifery practice? The birth canal is generally suitable for purpose. Calling for surgical procedures in all cases, as you are doing, is going full-bore Murphy.

  16. Diogenes

    I don’t know where you have been for the last few years, but you have clearly missed the large rise in negligence claims – and compensation paid – in midwifery and the ideological dogma pushed by the Midwifery establishment which caused it.

  17. From memory) I think AR claimed that the amount of compo was unnecessary if the NHS could instead fix the problems they had caused, not that there shouldn’t be lawsuits or correct apportionment of blame.

    Her claim was that as compensation went on fixing the problem, why not just let the NHS fix it and not pay compensation. Presumably she didn’t believe compensation for loss of opportunity or a severe reduction in quality of life should be paid. I’ve got to say, it was a pretty revolting stance.

  18. There are, for example, countries where natural birth is the norm along with very satisfied customers, eg the Netherlands. See, an example. Innocent until proven guilty, etc etc. All that lib stuff that seems to elude you.

  19. Anything to bring down the coven of harpies that is the midwifery establishment is a-ok in my book.
    Nearly killed my wife and my
    Daughter then after their incompetence they proceeded to make my wife guilty when said daughter refused to breastfeed.
    Personally if I could I would sack the lot of them without redundancy or pension

  20. Well done Fred for your profoundly argued and knowledge – free intervention. Continue blaming midwives for mistakes made by doctors.

  21. It is also fascinating that Tim thinks that midwives should do less of the “natural stuff” and Fred argues for more of the “natural stuff”. Can’t you get it straight between you when you launch your fact-free rants against the NHS?

  22. The unions representing the incompetent, the negligent and the unlucky think that the victims of their failure (whether or not the medical establishment was at fault) should have their compensation reduced.
    “Well he would say that, wouldn’t he?”

    As to changes in midwife training – it’s *not* the woo that is the main problem. 30 years ago, the fashion was all for unnecessary intervention so my wife, who despite her Arts degree looked at the evidence and checked out that natural childbirth was probably better than caesarian and attended NCT classes, which lacked “woo” (at least the ones that I managed to attend did) chosing a hospital birth but not caesarian unless essential (just one of the others in the group chose a fancy option (“water birth”)). However #1 son nearly died as the result of the incompetence of the midwife who was attending her and one other mother. We therefore chose a different hospital for #2 son, despite it being a longer drive in the middle of the night.

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