No Zoe, that’s actually the important question

That is the hot-button pay-gap question of the day – do women choose low-paid sectors because they are more naturally suited to them? Or is this all a gender construct, with the patriarchy putting centuries of graft into persuading one sex that they are hardwired to do the stuff the other sex doesn’t like the look of? Always happy to wade into a fight about gender essentialism, I sometimes forget to reject the premise. It doesn’t matter why women go into female-dominated sectors. The only question that matters is why women’s work is less well-paid.

29 comments on “No Zoe, that’s actually the important question

  1. A. Women are unfairly burdened with most of the duties of child-rearing.
    B. Children are reared to favour the patriarchy and dismiss women as lesser beings.
    C. Therefore it’s all men’s fault.

  2. She better be careful, she’s just suggested that women may be ‘naturally suited’ to some jobs, and by implication ‘naturally unsuited’ to others. I’m pretty sure this is precisely what got the Google chap into quite a bit of trouble with the SJWs, wonder if they’ll pile on Zoe and get her sacked too????

  3. She’s also assuming that the only relevant factor of pay is the salary.

    Wasn’t it Milton Friedman who said that you have to include everything – job security, physical danger, working time flexibility, training, and so on.

  4. Excellent, even better; if it was Adam Smith it’s hardly a new idea; you’d have thought it would have permeated into her knowledge, especially since she’s bring paid to write about it.

  5. Henry: “I look forward to Zoe’s application to become a London Sewer Engineer”

    She’s already there.

  6. I’m working on a mental picture of trying to fit an enhanced Vegas working girl into a small space. Push this, that pops out. Try to close the lid, arse won’t have it. Hard work.

  7. Mr. Ecks, I meant shoveling shit rather than peddling it.

    One of the best employee recommendations I ever saw was from a former colleague about a bloke on our development team who had obviously blagged his way in – didn’t know shit from Tuesday: People say X isn’t fit to shovel shit, I disagree.

  8. ‘Tesco’s mainly female checkout staff fight to be paid the same as male colleagues in the warehouse, inequality still plagues the workplace.’

    So it doesn’t matter anymore that they aren’t even the same jobs. Fuck me.

  9. No, forget supply & demand. “The only question that matters” is why does everyone hate People Like Us on the most superficial and indefensible grounds?

  10. Rod Liddle (pbuh) in this week’s Spectator:

    It is 100 years since women got the vote and I have been joining in the celebrations, on public transport — lightly tapping attractive women on the knee or gently massaging their lovely shoulders and saying, cheerfully, ‘Well done, babes!’ Some react with anger and irritation to my heartfelt congratulations, especially when I ask for their phone numbers so that we might discuss suffrage further — which is, I suppose, an indication they did not really want the vote in the first place. Certainly it imposes a terrible pressure upon them — they are forced, every five years, to make a clear decision.

    The statistics suggest many resent this imposition deeply, with women twice as likely as men to remain ‘don’t knows’ until the final minute: you can see them all, on polling days, making their way to the booth in a pretty little cloud of confusion. They are actually more likely to vote than men, and much less likely to know what they are voting about or for. I think, then, that this represents progress of a kind. It is also 100 years since working-class men got the vote, but nobody seems terribly bothered about that.

    The BBC has been in one of its fairly frequent states of oestrus over the event (much as it was when Nelson Mandela died and the organisation wore black armbands and kept showing black people singing ‘Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika’, which means‘Shoot the white farmer and rape his wife’, I think). I took part in a debate on the World at One about the #MeToo business, but I was up against four women, so was restricted in attempting to promulgate my considered thesis that #MeToo is basically affluent, entitled women whining about next to nothing.

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/2018/02/sometimes-men-deserve-to-be-paid-more/?utm_source=Adestra&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=100218_Weekly_Highlights_06_NONSUBS

  11. “Or is this all a gender construct, with the patriarchy putting centuries of graft into persuading one sex that they are hardwired to do the stuff the other sex doesn’t like the look of?”
    That is exactly right – men are told that they are hardwired into doing all the stuff women (well, 99.98% of women) don’t like the look of, such as getting shot at with arrows and javelins, then guns, then missiles, or emptying dustbins, or mining, or herding sheep in the snow, or doing horribly difficult maths, or hunting sabre-toothed tigers and mammoths and wolves and whales …

  12. @ Gamecock
    This is an attempt by Leigh Day to greenmail another mug, like they did with spurious complaints against British servicemen in Iraq.

  13. I’ve worked as a cashier and worked in a warehouse. If the differential is truly £3 then the warehousemen are getting cheated, not the cashiers.

    The warehouse I worked in required a fair amount of physical strength, especially upper body. Our jurisdiction legally limited what we could lift to 50 pounds but we usually ignored that to get the job done.

    The work was hard, dirty and tiring.

    Tell the lazy crybaby femsters to get warehouse jobs and STFU.

  14. A lot of stuff emerges from the Uber analysis. Essentially, women are paid the same rate as men but earn less – from choices about working hours, from not working long enough to build up experience and from the fact that men drive faster.

    http://freakonomics.com/podcast/what-can-uber-teach-us-about-the-gender-pay-gap/?utm_source=CapX+briefing&utm_campaign=435b818e92-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_07_17&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_b5017135a0-435b818e92-241857397

    DUBNER: So in summary, this is a labor ecosystem — Uber drivers — that would seem to remove all gender discrimination, and yet women earn 7 percent less for doing essentially the same work.

    DIAMOND: I mean, I think they’re not doing the same, right? That’s what we’re showing, they’re doing different — they’re making different choices in the labor market. I think it’s — really the whole point is that they’re not doing the same. And once you control for the differences, they are paid the same.

  15. ‘Tesco’s mainly female checkout staff fight to be paid the same as male colleagues in the warehouse, inequality still plagues the workplace.’

    So it doesn’t matter anymore that they aren’t even the same jobs. Fuck me.

    And they wonder why all the supermarkets have installed automated cashiers…

  16. @ Bloke in Wales
    One of the cashiers in my local Tesco is a middle-aged guy, suffering from constant back pain – had to give up his job and was glad to get a worse-paid one in Tesco; another, a nice guy but not very bright. took months to fully master the job but is now a stalwart on whom the branch relies to do that boring job. Neither could do the lifting in the warehouse. I really, really, do not believe that either of them backs Leigh Day.

  17. The usual solution is to pay the warehouse men . . . uhh . . . warehouse beings . . . the same as checkout clerks. Alienating them, and not changing the wimmin’s position at all.

  18. What the wimmins need to do is get some men to be cashiers. Then it will look like a real job and they can get more money.

  19. @ Gamecock
    There *are* some men cashiers, who don’t seem to be demanding pay equal to the warehousemen. It is a real job, and reckoned harder than shelf-stacking, just not the same as working in the warehouse.

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