33 comments on “Couldn’t happen to a nicer bunch

  1. Nothing like holding your hands up and admitting you screwed up. No, it’s always someone else’s fault.

    Mind you, the well recompensed scum who have infiltrated the public and charity sector are so deluded they may even (make themselves) believe it.

  2. I am enjoying this so much. The sanctimonious c*nts have obviously lived their entire lives thinking they are the Good People, and that everyone should love them. So when their friends in the media turn on them, they do not know what to do.

    It is sad and yet so pleasurable.

  3. Someone called me a fascist for pointing out some of Oxfam’s flaws and claimed it was all a right wing press plot. They went quiet when I pointed them to the BBC, Guardian and Economist. Only the craziest lefties call them right wing.

    It’s also worth noting that we’re in a classic NHS style false dichotomy situation. I mentioned that I don’t give to charities that get more than 50% of their income from governments and this was translated into wanting an end to all governement aid and gift aid.

  4. Half the shops in my local mall are charity shops, Not because they’re selling stuff anyone wants to buy. It’s because of their tax breaks and huge government funding that they can crowd out private shops. I’ll be glad to see the back of them. Not that I’m holding my breath.

  5. Strange that the accounts don’t cover the recreational activities of Oxfam staff

    Clean water
    – we provided over 300 million liters of clean
    water each month to approximately 400,000
    people in the camps and other areas.
    Working with other NGOs
    – Oxfam has played a key role in co-ordinating
    with other international agencies – through
    the so-called WASH and Shelter Clusters –
    to ensure that as the aid response unfolds,
    water is distributed equitably and in
    sufficient quantities. (NGO6)
    Sanitation
    – we built 2,500 latrines and 1,032 bathing
    shelters, which the camp residents and local
    people continue to maintain.
    Hygiene kits
    – we supplied more than 120,000 people with
    personal care items, such as soap, shampoo,
    toothpaste, toothbrushes, sanitary pads,
    and towels.
    Waste disposal
    – Oxfam worked with the local authority
    on the disposal of refuse.
    Livelihoods
    – our livelihoods and food security program
    has benefited more than 40,000 households.
    We have supported local food sellers,
    offered grants to help support people
    restart businesses, and set up
    cash-for-work programs.
    Shelter
    – 94,000 people benefited from Oxfam’s
    emergency shelter program. Oxfam supplied
    tarpaulins, tents, mosquito nets and other
    household kits containing basic necessities.

  6. I suppose digging 2500 latrines is some kind of achievement but it seems to be mostly about jaw-jaw rather than doing very much to help people. Handing out toothbrushes is all well and good but how much was Roland being paid? Rather more than your average shop assistant, I’d wager

  7. Hector, if charity shops can crowd out other shops solely with an 80% reduction in business rates then your town has other problems.

    First takes an empty shop. Then takes a landlord willing to rent out empty shop.
    Then takes a charity choosing to rent that empty shop.
    Rent, 20% business rates, wages, utilities, rubbish collection, epos / till system, advertising etc.
    Its quite possible for a charity shop to lose money. They don’t have the advantages the non charity shops have.

  8. BiND

    I don’t give to charities that get more than 50% of their income from governments

    You’re lenient 🙂 My % is circa a big fat round zero, which rules out most large charities in this age (smaller ones tend to offer far more bang for buck).

    And ditto if they spend a high percentage on fund raising – you’re donating so that they can employ people to raise money in order to employ people to…

  9. Martin,

    They also have a reduced wage bill because of the number of volunteers they get.

    My sone used to manage a couple of Dorothy House shops on Bath, in one hw was the only waged employee with 4other staff which equates to about 1.5 FTE and in the other he had 2 paid delivery/collection drivers, a prt time deputy and 3 FTE volunteers.

  10. “to ensure that as the aid response unfolds, water is distributed equitably”

    Oh, can’t you just imagine their glee at being in charge of water rationing?

  11. “our livelihoods and food security program has … set up cash-for-work programs”

    You mean it’s employed people?

  12. I’ve said before, they spend £14 million on their neo-Corbynite campaigns. Right there is the money to do proper safeguarding.

    If they publish anymore reports before they stop the perverts in their ranks they should be publicly crucified.

  13. PF,

    You have a point, I chose 50% because that’s what DK and his mates chose when they set up fakecharity.org.

  14. RichardT – “Oh, can’t you just imagine their glee at being in charge of water rationing?”

    Why do I get the feeling that they are more concerned about the equally part of the water distribution than the distribution part?

    Time and time again aid workers have shown remarkable lack of ability to be in charge of distributing anything. As you see with groups like al-Shabab. When young gun men turn up and demand a disproportionate share, they do not even put up a fight these days.

    RichardT – “You mean it’s employed people?”

    Well they employed one single young mother. Generously.

  15. BiND and PF – my level is 0% as well. I refuse to give to any charity while the state steals my money and gives it to these scum. Scum I would never willingly give to. So, yeah, sod the lot of them. And those that do not take the state’s shilling and feel they are suffering as a consequence of people reacting as I do need to campaign for a cessation of state funding of the third sector. In its entirely.

    It is not the place of the state to take my money by force and give it to corrupt political bodies such as OXFAM, NSPCC and such.

  16. “Hector, if charity shops can crowd out other shops solely with an 80% reduction in business rates then your town has other problems.
    First takes an empty shop. Then takes a landlord willing to rent out empty shop.
    Then takes a charity choosing to rent that empty shop.
    Rent, 20% business rates, wages, utilities, rubbish collection, epos / till system, advertising etc.
    Its quite possible for a charity shop to lose money. They don’t have the advantages the non charity shops have.”

    What advantages do the non-charity shops have? What the hell are you talking about? Oxfam gets enormnous amounts of money from the government, which the mom-and-pop newsagent doesn’t.

  17. For all this ‘safeguarding’, how many were reported to the police? What is being ‘safeguarded’ here, the vulnerable people or the organisation’s reputation?

    As for this Chief Executive, you’d be forgiven for thinking Oxfam didn’t have one for the first few days of this scandal. During what must be the biggest crisis in their history he was invisible. Then he pushed his deputy into the arena with orders to fall on her sword, still no sign of him. What is he paid for?

  18. @BiND, Longrider and PF

    My level is 0% as well.

    As LR said: It is not the place of the state to take my money by force and give it to corrupt political bodies such as OXFAM, NSPCC and such.

    Furthermore, once Gov’t (taxpayers) money accepted they are beholden to Gov’t

  19. @BiND, Longrider, PF and Pcar

    My chartered accountant business partner did his articles in the UK in the 90’s (he’s from SA) and had to audit several high profile UK charities. The findings/ results were staggering – so much so that he has never given to charity again and has set up his own charitable trust. After hearing the details, we have done the same.
    Charity always begins at home – do what you can for people you know…….

  20. Fair points about 0% for most charities. I happen to think there is a role for some of these organisations when it comes to disaster relief because governments are even slower and more inept.

    I don’t support any of them when it comes to development aid and definitely fall in to the trade not aid camp on that one because even charities that don’t take state money can be a disaster for those they are supposed to be helping.

    I read one story about an entrepreneur in Kenya or somewhere similar who borrowed some money to buy some hens which he was using to sell eggs to local villages and was growing his business. At about the same time some church in the USA thought it would be a good idea to donate eggs to the local area for a year. You don’t need me to tell you what happened to the entrepreneur.

  21. Apparently Oxfam Wales are mobilising in response to that earthquake in Wales – lock up your sheep and women.

  22. World Vision is fessing up too. Although I suppose it is better than giving their money to Hamas.

    This is going to run and run. It shows you what sort of people work for these organisations – even in Third World sh!tholes like Haiti, they have to threaten and bribe to get laid.

  23. I did work briefly as an accountant for one of the larger UK charities about 20 years ago and unless things have changed dramatically since then charity shops pay the same rent, rates, utilities etc as any other business. The usual thing was for charities to put all their shops and commercial activities in a separate trading company which then covenanted all their taxable profit to the charity proper. So no corporation tax but otherwise not operating at any regime advantage over other retail enterprises (except of course for free stock and zero payroll to speak of). The Charities Commission does (or did at any rate) have fairly strict rules on what activities qualify for treatment as charitable.

  24. And now Brendan Cox has resigned, its getting harder nd harder for the left to claim it’s all a right wing plot.

  25. Bloke in North Dorset – “And now Brendan Cox has resigned, its getting harder nd harder for the left to claim it’s all a right wing plot.”

    In tears. More proof that these people are predating in the Third World because they can’t get a half decent date in the West.

  26. “At present charities occupying commercial property are entitled to relief on business rates, provided it is used wholly or mainly for charitable purposes. Charities are eligible for 80% mandatory relief, which local (billing) authorities can choose to top up by an additional 20%.”

    Didn’t take much googling to find that.

  27. Well done. Now google ‘charitable purpose’. Fundraising is a charitable purpose. Administration of the charity is a charitable purpose. Curing cancer or training guide dogs or whatever is a charitable purpose, and you will get the rates reduction if that is what your premises are used for. Running a trading enterprise is not, even if the charity eventually gets the benefits.

    Like I said, it’s 20 years ago and I may be misremembering details, but I know charities paid commercial rates for charity shops because I’ve seen the relevant bills and payments. If I’m wrong, at least one major UK charity has been putting itself to a lot of unnecessary trouble to boost the coffers of local councils.

  28. Running a trading enterprise is not, even if the charity eventually gets the benefits.

    The (abbreviated) restriction on Charity Shops to be non-trading is they don’t sell new products for profit. However, it seems to not be enforced.

    I’m tired, Good night.

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