Not connecting the dots

In a highly complex, rule based, system the smallest of unforeseen and unplanned changes can have great significance.

Yes Ritchie. That’s why trying to plan something as complex as an economy doesn’t work.

16 comments on “Not connecting the dots

  1. Jesus, has he bred? The gene pool didn’t need that – we have enough young people who think that the magic money tree exists without him producing more.

  2. The Butterfly Effect – some rancid mare had sex with a pig-shit-thick man and produced Spud and the world was subsequently much worse for it.

    Young people were fed total crap under the illusion they were on an ‘economics’ course (not even to the standard of home economics).

    Probably not the significance that he has in mind – more like Lord Spud of Ely – a more ineffectual entry to the House of Lords one could not imagine (and I can imagine Lord Kinnock and Baroness Chakrabarti).

  3. Its so difficult to plan and coordinate an economy where the government encourages industry by keeping good order and collects the resulting land value increases as a tax. Suggested in 1776 and still the best and brightest in the UK can’t get their head round it.

  4. DNR Retard—he’s completely hatstand! Flogging a dead horse? The poor fucker’s ribs are showing.

    The amazing thing about The Egregious Tuber™ is that there are these occasional vignettes of sense in among the gibberish, like he’s necked a bottle of Goldschläger and then had a curry shit. They’re too far separated by ordure for him to ever join the dots, though.

  5. “In a highly complex, rule based, system the smallest of unforeseen and unplanned changes can have great significance”

    A better statement would be “In a highly complex system the smallest of unforeseen and unplanned changes can have great significance”. Adding that the system is ‘rule-based’ doesn’t really help. A very complex system is unpredictable whether or not it’s rule-based (although generally non-rule-based systems are more unpredictable that rule-based systems).

    Anyway, it’s not true to say that the British and European economies are rule-based. Partially rule-based, yes, in regards to the laws, but only partially. Most economic activity isn’t governed by anything resembling strict rules.

  6. DNR: the best and brightest in the UK can’t get their head round it.

    Neither good nor bright, but still twitching!

  7. Hector – the EU is nominally rule based but the rules are shite and ignored when convenient.

    In the Anglo sphere the rules tend to be a little less shite and less often ignored, and that is why the EU has been so damaging to us.

    Of course what Ritchie said is bollocks on stilts but we’re used to that.

  8. Yes, what we cannot get our heads around is how you collect a tax that is set at a rate in excess of 100% in ordr to cover government expenditure.

  9. Depends on how you design your rules and how self contained the system is, there should be error and exception capture that deals with problems in a non-catastrophic manner, adding rule based to the conditions weakens his argument

  10. That is also true of allowing un controlled markets forces to rampage through the carefully cultivated garden that is civilisation like a combine harvester .
    When you think of the Victorian anarchy of capitla which Tim presumably prefers its benefiuts overal,m were no doubt coinsiderable but the condition of much of the peopelations was , in manyways , measuarbly worse . Disease illiteracy infant mortality crime unemployment all increased periodically.
    Furthermore form the start, the state was heavioly involved in forming this new force . If you think of the development of rail for exmaple, or the aquisition of trade routes ,raw product and what not the state is all over it. The provions of education was shambolic and Health was not provided by the market in any consistent form .

    In these araes planning can be a good thing no ?

Leave a Reply

Name and email are required. Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.