Why not just allow smoking in pubs?

Providing line dancing classes for the lonely and elderly can cut unnecessary admissions to A&E by a fifth, officials have said.

The Local Government Association is also calling on councils to lay on pub sessions, choirs and communal lunches in a bid to keep people out of hospital.

It is part of a drive to crack down on loneliness, which deteriorates health and ends up costing the NHS millions.

The LGA said the health service can save £6 for every £1 spent on schemes that maintain people’s social lives.

Smoking reduces the cost to the NHS. Plus, if we want to be able to have pub sessions then we need to still have pubs. Instead of closing them down by preventing people from doing as they like to do in pubs – have a tab.

25 comments on “Why not just allow smoking in pubs?

  1. They need to mind their own fucking business.

    How long before some SOS is knocking on the door asking if you are lonely or not?

    Of course if she should happen to be a attractive young prossie….

    Tho if the shite-useless state were involved you’d be getting visits from Rita Webb lookalikes who would pocket your cash and then accuse you of rape–so no thanks.

  2. Can you imagine going to any do organised by the local council, probably some lemon sucking purple haired social worker who would use the occasion to further QWERTY environmentalism with extra SJW.? The notion of fun entirely eludes the classes tasked with farming people.

  3. This is just an attempt by local councils to grab part of the NHS budget.

    “The LGA [Local Government Association – the councils’ trade association] said the health service can save £6 for every £1 spent on schemes that maintain people’s social lives.” In other words, give us some of that big fat NHS budget to spend on crap that no-one will attend, and it’ll save you money in the long run, honest guv.

  4. What about the people who hate being in clouds of cigarette smoke and will abandon pubs again if smoking starts up?

  5. FFS Chernyy_Drakon, don’t bring common sense into the debate. You’ll be suggesting next that it should be up to individual, private businesses to choose what best suits them and their clientele when clearly this is an area that needs the heavy handed, intransigent approach of the health nazis, god bless them.

  6. A tab and a pint in my favourite boozer*. Ah, happy days. A lost world. Just chaps, or mostly. Before we were made unlawful.

    * It was The Flask, in Hampstead, if you’re interested. But rebranded itself as a gastropub, not well, about a decade ago and I haven’t been back since.

  7. I’m going to put a dancefloor on Harriet Harman’s grave. With pissing trenches on all four sides.

  8. “You vill line dance, and you vill enjoy it!”

    “Sorry, you have to show your dance card to be admitted.”

    One wonders what an ‘unnecessary admission’ is, and who gets to decide.

  9. “What about the people who hate being in clouds of cigarette smoke and will abandon pubs again if smoking starts up?”

    Where’s the evidence that non smokers started using pubs in any great numbers after the ban came in?

  10. “What about the people who hate being in clouds of cigarette smoke and will abandon pubs again if smoking starts up?”

    could be a business opportunity. smoking and non smoking pubs. on the other hand, there as the Bloke indicates, perhaps most barflies were smokers.

  11. Rossendale has about twice the prevalence of smoking as Richmond. Now you’d think a party with the name ‘Liberal’ in its title would think the power to allow Landlords to permit their customers to smoke on their gaffe should be devolved to local authorities, but no. The alleged liberal and democratic party endorse the system where the low-smoking area by virtue of twice the population has more say over what goes on in the high smoking area than the residents of that high smoking area do.

  12. Not just smoking that should be allowed in pubs. What about banning women from the main bar and consigning them to the snug, as was the happy situation in the boozers I used to frequent in my teens?

  13. @BraveFart, June 10, 2018 at 5:05 pm

    Indeed, larger pubs often had a saloon bar and a lounge/cocktail bar. Usually same staff, with counter on each side and different prices, furniture etc

    I preferred it. Used whichever best for mood or who with.

  14. Providing line dancing classes for the lonely and elderly can cut unnecessary admissions to A&E by a fifth, officials have said.

    I’d like to see the detailed paper backing up that statement, please. Sounds fairly implausible.

  15. “What about the people who hate being in clouds of cigarette smoke and will abandon pubs again if smoking starts up?”

    But they never came. That’s why so many pubs closed and many of the ones that are left aren’t really pubs; they’re restaurants in pub buildings. The smokers were the people who kept the roof on lots of pubs. The husband and wife popping in twice a year was a nice bonus, but if you had to lose one, you wouldn’t kick the smokers out.

    And this harmed a lot of social activity. I used to play in a cribbage league for a pub that closed. We didn’t make the pub much money but we got a space to play cribbage. We only got that space on a Wednesday because of the Friday and Saturday night drinking.

  16. My father ran a pub in Huddersfield with a tap room. In the rest of the pub he would bar anyone who swore (how long? “As long as my name is above the door” was his response.). He turned round a very disorderly pub on the edge of a very disorderly estate with that policy. He also insisted that men in work clothes had to use the tap room to protect the furnishings and clothes of pub users.

    When the law changed he advised any woman that went in to the tap room that they would have to live with swearing and scruffily dressed men. His view was men needed somewhere to unwind and that was the tap room.

    As BoM4 says, there was also a large social aspect to pubs. IIRC it was dominoes on Tuesday, quiz league Wednesday and darts Thursday. Landlords were expected to put on some free sandwiches.

  17. @ Matthew L
    As a life-long non-smoker I can inform you that many (by the time I was grown-up most) Pubs used to have a non-smoking area – called “The Lounge Bar” – intended for ladies, most of whom didn’t smoke (at least in public). I even drank in the Lounge Bar a few times because it was usually three-quarters empty when thepublic bar was crowded.
    Your assumption that non-smokers universally abhor tobacco smoke to the extent nthat they will leave if someone is smoking is just not true.

  18. @ Tim
    My local council lays on gentle exercise sessions for the over-50s in the gymnasium of the local sports centre (a charity founded by a charitable bequest of a wealthy farmer 30-odd years ago). Walking football etc, also Nordic Walking classes, some gentle countryside walks at around 2 mph – I daren’t go.
    Last Sunday (8 days ago) I was talking to one of my 70-year-old friends after she had finished her 10,000 metre race: she was staying on to help the officials with several of the other events, collect a medal for one of the younger athletes and deliver it at their next race in common. Line-dancing classes are doubtless well-meaning and may help a few but the active majority don’t get lonely.

  19. “Not just smoking that should be allowed in pubs. What about banning women from the main bar and consigning them to the snug, as was the happy situation in the boozers I used to frequent in my teens?”

    Sure. Up to the landlord and the market.

    If someone wants to set up a men-only pub, or a women-only pub, or a gays-only pub, or a ginger-only pub, or a trainspotter-only pub, or a socialist-and-ballroom-dancing-only pub, or whatever the hell they like, why not? So long as someone else can set up a competing pub nearby to serve all those rejected, the market will decide whether turning away some people’s money and pissing off those people and all their friends makes a profit.

    Just think how much fun the SJWs could have, organising boycotts of businesses that allowed the wrong sort in?

  20. @Matthew L

    ‘What about the people who hate being in clouds of cigarette smoke and will abandon pubs again if smoking starts up?’

    There never was a law preventing a landlord from barring people of whose jib he did not approve, so they could open a smoke free pub, I guess.

  21. There were several non-smoking pubs near here before the smoking ban, all on streets full of other pubs, clubs, eateries etc. About the only thing moving in any of them were the tumbleweeds. One even had bouncers on the door; presumably to keep any customers in!

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