Ya know, I don’t think this will work

This soft Brexit idea. It’s effectively the free movement of goods. Well, OK, that’s sensible. But it’s also not the free movement of people:

end free movement, giving the UK back control over how many people enter the country;

And haven’t we been told that the our freedoms are indivisible? We can’t have free movement of goods unless we have free movement of people?

23 comments on “Ya know, I don’t think this will work

  1. The EU is all in favour of the free movement of people from outside the EU (especially when they cross the Mediterranean in rickety boats); but woe betide anyone who tries to import butter without paying €1.89/kg in tariffs.

    So we increasingly have free movement of people without free movement of goods. It’s the worst possible combination.

  2. My best guess is that the EU will reject it anyway. After all the May negotiation technique appears to be to make an offer, and when it’s rejected to offer more. Even if Barnier accepts, some obscure legislature is bound to kick up rough.
    We’ll be leaving with no deal.

  3. Pat, that’s why our Prime Minister showed her Chequer’s proposal to Angela Merkel before she showed it to her Cabinet and the British people. What the stupid bitch fails to realise is that Merkel is an even bigger liar than she is.

    So you’re probably right.

  4. It not working (i.e. not being acceptable to the EU) might be the idea.
    May survives the political day by giving the remainiacs what they want* – then the EU rejects it anyway.

    Preparations for “no deal” have reportedly been stepped up.

    *the remainiacs, by disloyal nature, are more willing to bring May down than the Brexiteers are.

  5. One misconception that bedevils the British negotiating position (apart from May’s apparently never negotiated in her life before) is that the EU is concerned about the prosperity of people in Europe. It is concerned with its own power and wealth, and only does things for people if it needs their support. So from the EU point of view the best deal is the one that gives them power and money, they’d sell every European down the river if it got them what they want.
    Re ut Merkel’s power is fading, and hence her opinion is becoming unimportant.

  6. So the cabinet Brexiteers didn’t bother to oppose this because they assume the EU will reject it?

  7. MC – quite so . They didn’t object because they are cowardly lying unprincipled cucks seduced by the baubles of power.

    We’ll see how they like it with a white hot iron bar up the backside, which would be a wholly proportional punishment.

  8. All major parties have betrayed Brexit. You seem very placid Tim given that is a comprehensive and brazen sell-out by a scum-bitch who has steadily lied all the way thro’–as recently as last Weds.

    UKIP is all that is remains. Perhaps the ERG and a revolt. Tho’ given the cowardly nature of the Tory hierarchy I am not hopeful.

    The Fish Faced Cow must go and she must lose her pension. She needs to be the first serving UK Prime minister to be punished for deceit while in office.

    She has now cut off Labour Brexit voters the Torys could have had –and seen Jizza destroyed by–for the price of a decent Brexit. Corbin is that much nearer now. If the cunt thinks fear of Jizz will keep her in she is kidding herself. That nearly went pear-shaped under much better conditions for her last June. She is a grotesque mixture of snake-like deceit/ evil and monumental Walls-of-Constantinople-thick stupidity.

    A crafty move–details on a Friday 10pm–classic “nothing will happen at the weekend” so tempers have time to cool–she “thinks”. And a feel good counter dose if England win.

    But if they lose then bad news for the Cow . A sellout and England crash…oh dear.

  9. Such a shame there wasn’t a house fire somewhere in the country yesterday. Casualties would have been high as all present seem utterly incapable of finding the exit.

    They could make a movie about it; the ecks men.

  10. I always thought May would sell the country out and Britain would not, in effect and in the end, leave.

    So I am not surprised. However this deal was not as bad as I expected. So I guess Brussels will reject it and May will give in one everything else as well.

  11. SMFS: However this deal was not as bad as I expected. So I guess Brussels will reject it ….

    Yes, that’s certain.

    …and May will give in on everything else as well.

    I doubt that will happen. The EU will overplay it’s hand as it did with Cameron’s “renegotiation” and demand what even FFC (©Ecks) couldn’t concede.

  12. The fundamental issue here though is that the EU’s red lines are all the bullshit that they’ve sold the rump 27 nations as being necessary and which justify the existence of the EU in the first place, so if they concede on anything of significance for the sake of BRExit then the rump 27 will all be clamouring for their own exemptions and what have you and the facade of EU solidarity is exposed.

    Certainly people like Hungarian PM Viktor Orbán have been prepared to “take the money and stay”, without even have the gaul to pretend that they agree with things like the mass dispersal of immigrants and indeed I am guessing that when countries like Hungary go from being net recipients of EU funding to contributors during the 2020 – 2027 budget period then they will reached their own EU exit moment.

    So for all of Dress Up’s Checkers Memorandum, it’s essentially as worthless as the Munich Agreement, since the EU cannot accept even part of it without threatening its own existence.

    In essence the EU negotiating position is “accept all of the rules without influence” (i.e. BRExit in Name Only) or “withdraw Article 50”, both of which would be political suicide for Dress Up and her cabinet of fools and traitors.

    So, yes, all of this is just scenery on the road to a “Hard BRExit” as there is no freedom on either side for meaningful negotiation and compromise, since doing so would be an existential threat to both sides for different reasons.

  13. It always amazes me how the media seems to forget to mention that all the EU nations have to approve any deal, which is surely the biggest obstacle there is in the process

  14. Hope you are right Mr Galt.

    Still it is time for the strongest attacks possible on the FFC.

    The good side–if there be one–I believe –is that, having shown themselves to be cowardly, swallowing , turn-their-arses-on-it, bottling cunts, there is now no chance of Gove, Johnson, Davis etc being her successor. One less crew of Quisling Rightists ( tm Sean Gabb)

    If Rees Mogg has the bottle to stand–albeit even on his own-his future has a good chance of being made. She is threatening them with the return of “collective responsibility” –that info via Seaman Staines–so whoever stands and doesn’t give will reap long term gold whatever the short term result. If there is a long term left for the Tories.

  15. We all know that this bunch of idiots are mostly trying to either shaft each other or deliver BRExit in name only. Not one of these traitors has any interest in delivering a BRExit that is in the general interest of the voters.

    An Ecksian purge is long overdue.

    Fortunately, I think a hard BRExit was always on the cards given the impossibility of either delivering anything meaningful given the EU and UK red lines as well as the impossibility of compromise without triggering the collapse of the EU or the British Government.

    We will be saved from Tory treason and cowardice as much by the EU’s forced intransigence as anything else.

  16. Again I hope you are right but we can’t rely on that.

    Anything and everything to get at that cunt and make her and her henchmen’s life a misery now needs to be bought into play.

    Said it before but if every Brexit supporter wrote just one letter promising the end of the Tory Party no matter what if Brexit is sold out May would be changing her underpants on the half-hour.

  17. Spectator has some good articles, eg

    The tragedy of the Brexit Chequers summit

    …all the Cabinet is agreeing – or not agreeing – upon is the latest batch proposals to present before the court of Michel Barnier.

    To judge by his past record it should not be difficult to work out what will happen next. The government will have bust its collective gut to come up with something that its resident Brexiteers and Remainers can just about accept – and then M. Barnier will shake his head and say: “non, that is not possible. That option does not exist”.

    He has done it every time. His modus operandi is there for everyone to see: it is to stonewall all proposals coming from London and then to complain that the UK government doesn’t know what it wants, hasn’t presented him with a workable plan and then to tell us that the clock is ticking. But it is ticking because he wants it to tick. He wants a deal to be done, on his own terms, at a last minute summit on his own territory, shortly before the UK’s departure date next March. That is how the EU does business and how it has always done business

    What today’s meeting at Chequers should have been about – or rather what the government should have discussed months ago, long before it went on to discuss details on tariffs and barriers – is strategy, about how to play Barnier and his team at their own game…

    All May had to do was seek advise from and/or copy Trump when dealing with EU. She is too dumb and stubborn to do this.
    https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2018/07/the-tragedy-of-the-brexit-chequers-summit/

    .
    Theresa May’s Brexit plan is Remain by another name
    https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2018/07/theresa-mays-soft-brexit-is-remain-by-another-name/

    .
    Maybe this explains her woeful performance:
    Theresa May could not bear to watch the end of the England vs Colombia game because she found it too stressful. What hope is there when the woman who is supposed to be fighting our corner over Brexit hides behind the sofa during a penalty shootout?

    Anyone for crowdfuding a Baby May blimp?

  18. You have to have grudging admiration for the Remainers, they’ve played a long game. Brexit t means Brexit, red lines etc.

    Oops, we haven’t prepared for no deal so you’ll have to accept this deal.

    At least we will be out and it will be easier for a future Parliament to pull out of whatever traitorous deal is finally negotiated.

    Must run, I’ve got an order for hempen rope and street lights that I need to double.

  19. i. include a mobility framework so that UK and EU citizens can continue to travel to each other’s territories, and apply for study and work – similar to what the UK may offer other close trading partners in the future;
    That reads like free movement to me. Whether it will come with entitlement to claim means-tested benefits isn’t clear but it definitely looks, quacks and waddles like free movement.

  20. No deal? Meh. We don’t need anybody else’s permission not to shoot ourselves in the face by charging ourselves to buy foreign goods. And the EU doesn’t need our permission to ban EUians from buying our goods. We/they just need to defend it to their electorates.

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