There is a slight problem here

Best of all, though least likely to generate headlines, is the committee’s insistence that, from childhood, we all “need to be equipped in general with sufficient digital literacy”, and that social media companies pay “an educational levy” to fund this formidable social undertaking – from primary school onwards.

This is the civil defence of the future, the means by which we shall be given at least a chance of spotting the proliferating falsehoods, pseudo-science, cheap conspiracy theories and outright cyber-attacks we will encounter every day online. These are the new tools of contemporary citizenship.

Why is this any different from he perusal of the lies in the average election manifesto?

27 comments on “There is a slight problem here

  1. “Why is this any different from he perusal of the lies in the average election manifesto?”

    Because this load of CM shite can be used as a justification for children to be bombarded with even more CM ordure the instant they walk in the school door.

    The Purge is the only way to end this kind of cockrot.

    D’Asrseholer is only a pimple on the giant backside of lying Marxian–and esp remainiac scum– evil attempting to promote their propaganda will accusing everybody else of doing what socialism has been doing for decades–peddling lies and deceit.

    The prick Tory MP Damian ( apt) Collins who is behind the HoC version of the Gladrag’s tripe is one of the MPs whose Association does not have an email to complain on. So phone the buggers up and tel them what you think of their fake fake news.

  2. Why would social media companies agree to pay a levy to some nebulous concept of ‘digital literacy’ when people take up their services willingly?

  3. “With more elections looming, we must be the only source of information permitted to the proles”.

  4. It is indeed nauseating to learn that Vote Leave was busily planning its targeted ads even while the national campaigns were officially suspended as a mark of respect to the murdered MP Jo Cox.

    While all Remain campaigners went home and sat on their hands for a week following the sad death of Jo Cox. Or maybe not.

    Newsflash: democratic politicians have lied (or, to put it more politely, quoted selectively from the truth to support their argument) ever since the earliest days of Classical Athens. Anyone over the age of 25 who hasn’t noticed this probably shouldn’t be permitted access to sharp objects.

  5. Maybe it would be nauseating, Chris, but only if it were true. This is the Cadwallader effect, the constant repetition of lies

  6. You know that the examples used in such a programme would include not just the clear nonsense as examples but contestable political ideas that are not fashionable with the political and media class.

    So they will be asked to view news/pieces that are critical of environmentalism suspiciously but nothing from the opposite pole which is just as political and constestable.

    I imagine press releases from quangos and ngos wouldnt be categorised as political propaganda but the gwpf would for example.

    Thus it wouldnt be building objective critical thinking but shoring up the same boilerplate politics and assumptions of the elites.

  7. the means by which we shall be given at least a chance of spotting the proliferating falsehoods, pseudo-science, cheap conspiracy theories and outright cyber-attacks we will encounter every day online

    Well, that’s the BBC, Guardian, Telegraph, etc. fucked.

  8. As the state school system appears to have major difficulties teaching, by the age of 16, basic reading writing and sums to some 25%+ of its “clients”, what chance “digital literacy”??

  9. Steve

    “the means by which we shall be given at least a chance of spotting the proliferating falsehoods, pseudo-science, cheap conspiracy theories and outright cyber-attacks we will encounter every day online”

    There used to be such a thing as Critical Thinking. And it used to be considered a fundamental element of a proper education. Unfortunately, those with it will spot the tendentious crap this is within two syllables and therefore some spurious lie about the need for ‘digital literacy’ has to be conjured up.

    p’s. Isn’t ‘digital literacy’ a contradictory and meaningless term? Literacy pertains to words. How can it be digital?

  10. “that social media companies pay “an educational levy””

    I stopped reading at that point.

  11. “There used to be such a thing as Critical Thinking. And it used to be considered a fundamental element of a proper education.”

    Indeed; but a large percentage of the population are unable to think critically until circumstances compel them, too. Then they return to bovine passivity.

    In so far as there’s a problem with fake news, raising the voting age to 25-30 and introducing a property qualification for the electoral roll would largely solve it.

  12. I don’t remember them ever being this concerned about political manipulation by the non-digital media.

  13. “p’s. Isn’t ‘digital literacy’ a contradictory and meaningless term? Literacy pertains to words. How can it be digital?”
    Maybe ‘digital literacy’ is just ‘numeracy’?

  14. Digital literacy is generally meant to be the ability to use digital devices. The words and concepts associated with them is a form of literacy. Fonts, point sizes, html code, etc.

    It has zero to do with analysis of content. That’s a combination of ordinary literacy and being able to read sub-text — what English teaches.

    A digital literate might be able to put the fake news into pdf though.

  15. In so far as there’s a problem with fake news, raising the voting age to 25-30 and introducing a property qualification for the electoral roll would largely solve it.

    This.
    Far from lowering the voting age to 16, I’d raise it to 25. Nobody know nothing about nothing til at least then. Below that age their opinions are all second-hand. They simply haven’t had the life experiences to allow them to have rational opinions.

  16. Theophrastus & Philip Scott Thomas

    Raise the voting age to 25, sure. However, I wouldn’t necessarily have a property qualification. I would have a net positive tax position though: You only have the right to vote if you pay more in tax than you receive back, so your proportional share of government expenditure plus any benefits you receive should be less than your tax paid.

  17. Recusant… I think that you’ve just suggested the disenfrachisement of 90%+ of the retired community!

  18. Universal suffrage cannot survive for long where more than 50% of the electorate are takers rather than contributors.

  19. Or where vast numbers of people are ‘educated’ beyond the level of their intelligence.

  20. Or two chambers – one called the HoC that decides what is illegal and elected by everybody, the other ( let’s call it the HoL ) that sets departmental budgets, benefit rates, public sector pay which is elected by the net contributors.
    Some refinement of the division of power needed in this model. And as much as possible should be devolved to councils.

  21. I think that you’ve just suggested the disenfrachisement of 90%+ of the retired community!

    Not if we sum over a lifetime, but maybe you’d get a cut-off at 90-95 years of age. It will take at least that long for my OAP to match the tax on my lifetime earnings, even at current discount rates. And I have no intention of relying on the tender mercies of the NHS 🙂

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