Snigger

One final note that makes me chuckle. Elon made his big announcement on Twitter. He has also blocked a lot of people on Twitter–including me in 2013 or 2014. Well, selective disclosure of public information–giving it to some people earlier than others–violates Reg FD (“Regulation Fair Disclosure”). So by (a) blocking me (and many others) on , and (b) running his big brain waves through Twitter, Elon might have committed other securities violations.

Hahahaha.

23 comments on “Snigger

  1. Tweets are public. You can be blocked from replying to someone’s tweets, but there’s nothing stopping anyone from going to the Twitter website anonymously and reading Musk’s tweets.

  2. No-one has a reason to follow his tweets if he doesn’t state that financial information will be released there first. The channel not only has to be available, it must be declared as a channel.

    I’m not stating the rules here but what is fair.

  3. @Rhoda
    “I’m not stating the rules here but what is fair.”
    +1

    iirc first announcement must be to SEC

  4. Elon says it’s going private at 420; last close was 347.64.

    Can you be done for market manipulation if the market laughs and tells you to piss off?

  5. “Can you be done for market manipulation if the market laughs and tells you to piss off?”

    You can if you’re not one the the golden children of the liberal elite. If you are on the other hand it’ll all be brushed under the carpet………I bet the SEC issue nothing more than a rap on the knuckles to Musk over this. If it was one of the Left’s hate figures he’d be doing the perp walk by now.

  6. @RK

    “The channel not only has to be available, it must be declared as a channel.”

    Musk actually submitted the relevant paperwork for this a while ago, though I can’t remember what the form is called.

  7. He has some convertibles that need the share price above 360 I believe, so he might have been trying to push the share price up with these comments – which is a form of market manipulation, but more likely he has some very vocal and aggressive short sellers and I suspect he was probably trying to squeeze them out of the stock. This may or may not be manipulation, but he doubtless sees it as meeting fire with fire. There is no doubt in my mind that ‘big auto’ is working very aggressively behind the scenes to destroy Tesla as a business and that the media, who are heavily dependent on auto ad spending are complicit.
    Last time I dared to mention Tesla on here I got the closest to abuse I have ever received on this civilised blog so I tread warily, but know that every major manufacturer is working desperately on building an all electric car like Tesla but they dare not admit is otherwise why would you buy the old ICE machine? The average car journey is 15 minutes and the average car spends 90% of its time parked. Charging at home is no harder than plugging in your iphone at night. For me, at least, who doesn’t need to hear a V8 engine on my daily commute the ease, speed and smoothness of driving the car is complemented by the fact that my fuel bills over the last almost 4 years are the same as my service bills (ie nothing at all). Sure he has taken a lot of subsidies, but at least consumers get something from it – better cars and zero roadside emissions – compared to the majority of green subsidy scams.

  8. Got to agree with you Mark; I’m more than happy with my Tesla (and my wife’s i3) and have never had to worry about range on either of them (indeed, I’ve only had to charge them away from home a few times).

    I do miss the V8 sound though; still got my fingers crossed for a future Easter Egg to be able to choose car sounds (F1 (proper F1, not the current rubbish), Diesel truck, V8 etc)!

  9. “Charging at home is no harder than plugging in your iphone at night. For me, at least, who doesn’t need to hear a V8 engine on my daily commute the ease, speed and smoothness of driving the car is complemented by the fact that my fuel bills over the last almost 4 years are the same as my service bills (ie nothing at all). Sure he has taken a lot of subsidies, but at least consumers get something from it – better cars and zero roadside emissions – compared to the majority of green subsidy scams.”

    Very nice for you both. Your testimony brings to mind that scene in “The Grinch” where, tiring of being fired along a giant pneumatic tube as his chosen method of transport, he declares “A car would have paid for itself by now”.

    However not everybody is a WOMI ( or NZ equivalent)with extra emphasis on the “well-off” bit. If the POS was cheap and durable it might make a small amount of sense but of course if you need to actually go somewhere you will need a real car that can serve as something other than Noddy and Mr Plod’s runabout.

    Those who can afford a second–real–car have no need to worry of course.

    Failing that you can rent–if you don’t mind high expense and vast levels of bureaucratic snoop and tyranny. Or get on “public” transport–if you are a twat who should be barred from car ownership anyway.

    Or just get a real car in the first place. And stop feeding the ego of green conmen everywhere.

    Musk’s space capers are the only decent thing about the con artist. His car scams are a disgrace.

  10. Trouble is, sometimes you need your car for longer journeys. Mine are mostly to the pub or the restaurants/cinema/etc in the nearest town ten miles away. But last week I had to drive my daughter and two pals to Newquay for the Boardmasters festival – round trip of 400-odd miles. How does an electric car fit into that?

  11. The “average” car journey is a completely useless statistic. The “average” person had 0.97 testicles.

    I take my car for lots of 5 minute drives, and then a four hour one. It better last four hours.

    It’s particularly amusing for a Kiwi to be pushing short trips, because we have rubbish public transport. I pretty much have to drive to my holidays in Northland from the Waikato, as the alternatives are insane.

    As Ecks says, we could live with an electric car because we have a real one for long trips. But until they cost the same, it’s only for posers to show how virtuous they are.

    NZ has built nearly every possible dam and nearly every possible geothermal. Any mass adoption of electric cars will have us run out of electricity. Sun and wind ain’t going to carry us through the winter, so we’d need to rebuild coal plants. A crazy solution if the point is to reduce the carbon dioxide output.

    (Or go nuclear — which is as likely as me growing a third testicle given our nutty confusion between nuclear power and nuclear weapons.)

  12. The answer is plug-in hybrids (full disclosure: I drive an Outlander). For 30 mile trips (realistically more like 20 miles in the hilly area where I live) I can enjoy all the benefits of electric running (quiet, cheap and smug) and recharge in a few hours from a standard power socket at home (or elsewhere). On longer journeys, I simply fill her up with petrol.

    Absent some magical breakthrough in electric storage technology, this is likely to be the only practical solution for private vehicles.

  13. Electric cars strike as a great idea for a second car used to just runaround locally, shame the prices make this an unrealistic option as usually that’s also a cheaper vehicle

  14. “The answer is plug-in hybrids”

    Not really, the economy is poor on petrol only. So a long trip ends up costing a fortune. Mate of mine had an Outlander, got rid of it eventually, as it was costing him so much on long runs.

  15. Not really, the economy is poor on petrol only.

    I find this bizarre!

    When petrol prices go up we are lectured about how to improve fuel economy – tyre pressures, light on the right foot and they always mention empty any unnecessary weight from the car.

    And yet a hybrid which is dragging around a bloody great battery, electric motor and other regenerative hardware and electronics is supposed to be a good idea…?

  16. For people who live in urban areas, it might work to keep the electric car at home (if, as is likely, vast majority of drives are around town) then go to a rent-a-car place if you want an ICE for a big day trip. If autonomous vehicles come to pass there would be some sense in renting an autonomous ICE that makes its way to your own door before a big trip, but that’s still pie in the sky stuff for now.

  17. @Jim
    The economy on petrol isn’t bad (35 mpg at m/way cruising for a two-ton brick). But it isn’t a sensible car for road warriors, who won’t benefit from short trips on electric only. But many have been bought/leased by such people, simply because of the tax benefits.

    @BiC
    The advantage of a hybrid is that the engine can be run at its most efficient speed, independent of the speed of the car. This more than compensates for the extra weight of batteries (pure hybrids have a few kWh, my PHEV has 12kWh, a practical pure electric needs 75kWh or more).

    But that isn’t why I chose mine – it was purely for the tax benefits (a few grand a year),.

  18. The advantage of a hybrid is that the engine can be run at its most efficient speed, independent of the speed of the car.

    Doesn’t a CVT do that…?

    The point is that it involves a lot of complex (and expensive) technology to do what ICE has been capable of for years.

    I’ve just bought a new Kia Sportage which is capable of way over 40mpg on the motorway…

    Admittedly, if the gubberment skews the tax regime it might make sense, but that is an argument against the gubberment rather than for PHEV.

  19. Doesn’t a CVT do that…?

    Yes, indeed, but CVTs are relatively heavier than a standard gearbox and limited in how much power they can handle – drivers don’t like them. I agree that a pure hybrid isn’t much more economic than a similar sized ICE, particularly a diesel (but they’re the spawn of the devil, this week).

  20. BniC,

    “Electric cars strike as a great idea for a second car used to just runaround locally, shame the prices make this an unrealistic option as usually that’s also a cheaper vehicle”

    The problem is that you’re limited to that.

    You buy a Nissan Micra, you might think about just using it to go to the shops but if the need arose you could drive to Newcastle in it. This also impairs resale. Someone buying a first cheap car to use as a main car isn’t going to buy it.

    I’m not saying we won’t all be electric one day, but I don’t see the big advantage at the moment and lots of downsides.

  21. @Mark T,

    How does one recharge car when one lives in 6th floor flat and parking is in a car park or anywhere with no drive?

    Who pays for the “install points” the upgraded supply cables, transformers etc?

  22. @Pcar

    A chap on my street lives in a flat with no assigned parking and no access to a charging point on the street. He has a Tesla S.

    Talking to him – he mostly does short journeys, with long trips on weekends. A mix of using Superchargers, and charging overnight when the family goes away for the weekend.

Leave a Reply

Name and email are required. Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.