A very minor whinge

One of the house guests is gluten intolerant. No, really and properly.

OK. I thought about corn tortillas. Why not?

Only to find that all the ones in the shops are wheat tortillas. Where does one get corn ones from?

20 comments on “A very minor whinge

  1. One makes them oneself. Can of corn. Food processor. Make batter. Thirty minutes prep? Just like making Yorkshire puddings

  2. My wife has coeliac syndrome so I’m used to reading ingredients lists. It’s appalling how much food you wouldn’t expect to contain wheat does. I presume wheat is used as a cheap filler.

    I’d second Diogenes’ remark – cooking things yourself may take time but usually tastes better. Alternatively in the UK the fad for going gluten free at least means the “free from” aisles are stocked with decent stuff, but I don’t know if that’s got to Portugal yet.

  3. Is there wheat in Doritos? Not in the bag in our pantry but “made in a factory that also handles wheat, gluten, barley, soya, celery, mustard”.

  4. Diogenes: I’m a tad alarmed by your recipe. Tortillas are made from dry corn treated with slaked lime(30-45 mins boiling after overnight soak depending on variety) then ground to a flour from which you then make tortillas (very easy with a press). The lime treatment (nixtamalisation) is essential as it alters the starch structure. The proper flour may be bought online or at Mexican shops: it’s called masa harina or maseca, takes 5 mins.

  5. Morrisons and Tesco sell corn tortillas

    https://www.bbc.com/food/recipes/corn_tortilla_59257

    https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-corn-tortillas-from-scratch-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-85904

    What Is Masa Harina?

    To make corn tortillas, you need masa harina. This ingredient looks a lot like finely-ground cornmeal, but is actually a different product altogether. Masa harina is ground from corn kernels that have been soaked in limewater — an alkaline solution that actually changes the physical structure of the corn, making it physically softer and also freeing up more of its nutritional content.

    Don’t try to substitute cornmeal for masa harina — your tortillas will just end up brittle rather than pliable.

  6. “Diogenes
    August 18, 2018 at 5:15 pm

    One makes them oneself. Can of corn. Food processor. Make batter. Thirty minutes prep? Just like making Yorkshire puddings”

    Oh lord no. That just sounds horrible and you won’t be able to make tortillas out of it.

  7. Most of the supermarkets here now stock them – both the ‘Old El Paso’ and ‘Santa Maria’ brands do them, if these are available in Portugal.

  8. Just checked the larder & we seem to have harina de maiz P.A.N. I know that’s what the brasilenas make arepas from & the pan de queso, but we normally eat tortillas de trigo from the super.
    The P.A.N. says “sin gluten” on the packet so should be OK. And I’ve seen it in Portuguese supermarkets,
    I’d wake up an expert but I’m not feeling quite that brave, yet

  9. Incidentally, there’s a whole other family of bread type foods comes out of S. America based on yuca (casava) flour. Yuca’s a root, so not even a grain. Yuka flour pancakes are delicious.& a particular favourite, in this house.
    Again, your supermarkets should carry the makings.

  10. ‘It’s appalling how much food you wouldn’t expect to contain wheat does.’

    Huh? What’s appalling about it?

  11. @ljh. Thanks. Very useful. Gluten allergy here so I’m buying hideously expensive gluten free tortilla at the mo. We do us buckwheat flour but it has to be milled in a gluten free facility otherwise I get ill anyway from cross contamination.

    A quick note
    – gluten intolerant = probably ok with food processed in a facility that handles gluten
    – allergic to gluten = definitely not ok with food processed in a facility that handles gluten

  12. Tom, OT – WTF is happening with the comments over at CT? It was bad enough a few weeks ago but now the same comments are appearing several times. Please fix!

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