Well, we could always ask London for advice

Britain’s first unmanned trains have sparked a safety row as politicians and union officials voiced concerns about football crowds on match days.

The new Glasgow Subway trains were announced to much fanfare this week, designed to be driverless and completely unstaffed by 2021. As well as having no drivers, they will also have no door staff.

While some lauded this as the future of transport, others worried that passenger safety was not being prioritised.

Pat McIlvogue, a regional officer for the Unite union, said there were worries about overcrowding and rowdy passenger behaviour on match days.

He told The Telegraph: “Match days are a well-used situation and how they’re going to manage the influx of traffic and people piling into doors when the doors are shut, what happens then?

Well, Mr Union Officer. Have you gone and asked those nice people at the Docklands Light Railway how they do it?

12 comments on “Well, we could always ask London for advice

  1. If there’s trouble on match days, I’m pretty certain they already have police there.

    On a more general point, this is the problem with things like striking and blackmailing people with monopoly power. You might make some money in the short term, but you create incentives to get rid of you. Mate of mine works for London Transport and said that the strikes changed public opinion about driverless trains in London from “risky” to “reliable”. The unions can say what they want in London about driverless trains – the public heavily support their introduction.

  2. Did he declare his quite obvious interest in this?

    Anyway, “safety concerns” about passengers can be solved in the traditional manner – a hefty pay rise to the drivers. Except, of course, this time there aren’t any…tricky.

  3. Yep DLR staff find it much easier to deal with customers as they aren’t driving at the same time …. funny that.

  4. If there is trouble on match day, the trains do not stop but carry on to the next station. By the time the circle is complete, hopefully, the trouble is over.

  5. Vancouver transit trains have been driverless and no staff on each train for over 25 years. During events the flow of people into the station at the stadiums is handled to ensure it matches the train frequency st the platforms.
    Love how this is ‘the future’ when it’s common practice elsewhere.

  6. @Bloke on M4, September 22, 2018 at 7:52 am

    …The unions can say what they want in London about driverless trains – the public heavily support their introduction…

    Do you have a link to that? I’d love it to be true.

    Victoria line was meant to be driverless, but mgt capitulated.

  7. There are (minor) differences – DLR is a light railway (clue in the name) limited to 25mph/40kph. But it’s very safe, around 1 fatality per annum. Even suicide attempts seem much rarer than on the rest of London Transport. Some stations are ‘sealed’ with doors that only open when a train is stopped, but many aren’t, so I wonder if people looking to jump under a train somehow prefer there to be a human driver involved.

  8. @Chris Miller, September 22, 2018 at 11:18 pm

    …I wonder if people looking to jump under a train somehow prefer there to be a human driver involved

    Never thought about that, makes sense as suicider may blame State/people for their woes.

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