3 comments on “Well, no, not really

  1. Well, it had successfully taken off, and nearly made it to its destination before crashing. Clearly the headline was written to make the readers know that the crash had a Scottish angle. I think you’re splitting hairs, Tim.

  2. Two dead after light aircraft from Scotland crashes in East Yorkshire.

    Still grabby, more info, same word count. Gissa job.

  3. PJF,

    Absolutely no. You obviously haven’t been keeping up and we may have to move you to the front of the class.

    Headlines aren’t written to inform, they are there to:

    1. Excite search engines
    2. Get you to click through.

    Sub headlines are even worse – h2, h3, h4 etc are always written in the form of questions people might use to search:

    HTML h1 HMRC tax gap report has interesting information

    One line para.

    One line para.

    HTML h2 Why is Richard Murphy such a fucking idiot?

    One line para.

    usw

    The BBC takes this to excess and it is making their website virtually unreadable.

    Its making a real mess of Betteridge’s law of headlines.

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