No government at all is ever a functioning one

What is extraordinary about this is that the UK has not even got the option of crashing out of the EU whilst keeping any pretence of having a functioning government, if the ability to enforce the law and collect tax owing is indication of that, on which I think most would agree.

So, to the man who insists that the tax gap is £120 billion. Being able to collect tax due is the definition of a functioning government. Which the UK government currently does not do. Therefore, by this definition, the UK government is not a functioning one.

And Brexit is going to change this how?

Sure, there’s an answer to this. Which is that a functioning government is one which collects the tax due which is worth collecting. But that inevitably means a tax gap. Which isn’t something Spudda is likely to agree should happen either.

11 comments on “No government at all is ever a functioning one

  1. Complete cockrot from the potato and hmrc. As far as i can decipher his ramblings hmrc say they won’t be able to collect tariffs despite the fact that they are now able to collect the myriad of eu imposed tariffs quite successfully. Many moons ago i worked in hmce and there were regular updates about these tariffs from the eu sometimes several a day. So it’s not impossible to issue a new set of tariffs – it’s all computerised anyway . As for general taxation – that’s not a function of the EU but the increasingly inept hmrc.
    It’s about time the potato put down his ipad/phone and fucked off somewhere in the EU where he can peddle his claptrap to a bunch of incredulous europeans.

  2. You cannot believe any statement regarding WTO brexit from any government organisation. They are not free to tell the truth, they have a script to adhere to.

  3. So the latest news is Theresa May just sold out Gibraltar.

    This really is the death of the Conservative and Unionist Party.

    Dunno what’s going to replace them, mind. UKIP?

  4. It might be a UKIP2 of some sort, but with a clear focus on cross party? In that UKIP has probably run its course – perhaps “tarnished” in too many ways for it to now again to become a focus of (cross party) mass revolt electorally?

    If this does get through Parliament, the protest will surely be bigger than anything we’ve seen, and which will drive events.

    And from a different perspective, could the Conservative Party even survive (as it is now) if this does get through. I’m not personally convinced?

  5. @Tim N

    OT

    Thanks for changing CT to Headlines Initial Capitals from that awful Headlines in BOLD UPPER CASE

    When are comments coming off intrusive Disqus – again?

  6. PF – If this does get through Parliament, the protest will surely be bigger than anything we’ve seen, and which will drive events.

    Dunno. We’re not French. The British centre-right doesn’t really “do” street theatre. Not that it matters – did the Iraq War protests, Occupy St Paul’s, The Countryside Alliance, the Trump Baby balloon, or Fathers4Justice achieve anything?

    Unless we’re actually going to go V FOR VENDETTA, protests are only good for media narrative building (no righties need apply) and amusing the participants.

    Lefties get more out of protesting (the cathartic release of emotions among like minded folks) than righties do. Different personality types.

    could the Conservative Party even survive (as it is now) if this does get through

    Short term, yes, but as a regional party representing Metropolitan wankers who nonetheless don’t want to pay more tax, no-mark political careerist wannabes, and… humiliation porn enthusiasts?

    Long term, they’re going down the path the Canadian Progressive Conservatives once trod. Maybe they’ll ask for a merger with UKIP at some point.

    I think I’m right in my back-of-a-vape-packet calculation that a swing of just 5% against them would mean 70 Conservative MP’s lining up at the JobCentre Plus.

    Dunno what percentage of 2017 Conservative voters are going to sit out the next election or vote against their incumbent Conservative MP, but it’s probably higher than 5%. Conservative voters really hate May’s “deal”.

  7. I think I’m right in my back-of-a-vape-packet calculation that a swing of just 5% against them would mean 70 Conservative MP’s lining up at the JobCentre Plus.

    Indications perhaps this evening that May can see the writing, and is wriggling yet again (91 MPs, potentially, in revolt, hence, it looks like they too can do the maths). It mgiht have a way to run yet..

  8. Lining up at the Job Centre, Oh god, I wish. They’re the sort of well-padded sort that never need worry about basic essentials. Like when I lost my council seat, I signed on the Dole following Monday, my replacement was a mid-level lawer.

  9. @jgh in Japan, November 25, 2018 at 12:24 am

    +1

    Defeated MPs receive iirc £40,000 severance pay – aka punish taxpayers – to help them readjust.

    Dole (JSA) is £73.10.pw – £3,801.20 pa

  10. @Pcar. JSA is taxable. So that £73 a week turns into £40 if you were a 40%(+!) tax payer and lost your job in the last half of the year.

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