Doesn’t really work, does it?

The U.S. Office of Personnel Management has offered federal workers affected by the partial government shutdown a guide for negotiating with creditors, landlords and mortgage companies while their income is cut off.

The Thursday tweet notes that workers should consult with a “personal attorney” for advice but offers templates for how one might seek financial assistance for various financial obligations.

Among the suggested strategies: A furloughed employee might offer to trade maintenance services such as painting or carpentry work in exchange for a reduction in rent.

If they could do useful work like painting or carpentry then they wouldn’t be bureaucrats, would they?

14 comments on “Doesn’t really work, does it?

  1. Landlord’s reply: “I can’t pay my mortgage with paint!”

    I once had a tenant offer to pay his rent with the ceramics he made. The above was, in effect, my reply.

  2. And if they manage to do something useful, that is of course taxable income. Which I am sure they will be falling over themselves to declare on the tax return.

  3. More Poison Seeps Out

    More small businesses could be slapped with a VAT bill if Theresa May’s Brexit deal is approved by MPs in next month’s crunch vote, report warns.

    A parliamentary report, slipped out on Christmas Eve, warned if the PM’s Brexit deal is approved, the UK would be forced to lower the threshold – from £85,000 to €85,000 – even after Brexit.

    The report, by the Commons EU Scrutiny Committee, said the UK will lose its veto over any change if it leaves the EU as planned on March 29.

  4. An entirely unnecessary slur on all bureaucrats.

    Firstly, not all people working for the government are bureaucrats. Many of those shut down will be IT technicians, cleaners, and maintenance people.

    Moreover, I’m a good interior painter — far better quality than commercial guys, albeit slower. I didn’t lose that ability for the period I worked for the government.

  5. Wait a damn second! Why is the U.S. Office of Personnel Management still running? Who the fvck needs them ?!?!

  6. Whenever I’ve been in the position of struggling to pay the rent and bills, I’ve always made sure I kept my attorney on retainer as a first priority.

  7. “Moreover, I’m a good interior painter — far better quality than commercial guys, albeit slower. I didn’t lose that ability for the period I worked for the government.”
    The ability to be better or the ability to be slower?

    And having employed a lot of P&D’s, the ability to work through a job quickly to acceptable quality is what I was looking for. Yeah, there’s any number of talented amateurs about. But they take about 3 times as long as the pros. Never found any willing to work for a third of the money, though. If I could find them, I employed women. Much better attention to detail than the guys so much shorter, expensive snagging lists. And cleaned up properly, after them. The interesting tasty eats they brought to work with them were a bonus.

  8. Y’know, looking back over what I’ve written there I’m thinking is what I’ve been looking for in employees is the ability to tackle a job competently & when they’ve completed the stages, to go back over what their work & check it’s been done correctly & fix errors if it hasn’t.
    So that would exclude employing pretty well anyone from the university educated professional classes, wouldn’t it? Particularly journalists.

  9. Y’know, looking back over what I’ve written there I’m thinking is what I’ve been looking for in employees is the ability to tackle a job competently & when they’ve completed the stages, to go back over what their work & check it’s been done correctly & fix errors if it hasn’t.

    This might be cultural, certainly at the company level if not national. Where I worked until recently, engineers used to pass on technical work unchecked and littered with errors. If you took this up with them they’d just say “Well, if you find anything you think is wrong tell me and I’ll correct it”. There was absolutely no shame in their having done a rubbish job. I’ve worked in other companies where this would destroy your reputation within days.

  10. @TimN
    I’ve found that is often the case in large businesses (particularly ones where the big bosses are safely sequestered in a shiny office a continent away). In outfits that are sufficiently small that the technical bods all know one another, your reputation soon precedes you.

Leave a Reply

Name and email are required. Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.