The joys of extended English

Here, from the Zimbabwean variant:

After a night of pleasure, an unfortunate man from Zvishavane was arrested for bedding a juvenile who he claims he assumed was a thigh vendor.

Isn’t “thigh vendor” a lovely synonym for tart?

14 comments on “The joys of extended English

  1. Line at bottom of article:

    ‘This website uses cookies to improve your experience.’

    I wonder if Chinorira used cookies.

    It’s too bad for him. The law, at least in the West, puts the onus on the participant to insure the other party is of age.

    I can’t comment on the comments:

    ‘The law is an ass for shoo, unonyura uchifunga kuti urikuita chaizvo, sorry mate.’

    Most are an odd combination of English and something.

  2. Most are an odd combination of English and something.

    I always find it fascinating that, if you watch a film in Hindi, you can understand about 20% because there is so much English thrown in, not just the odd word, but whole phrases.

  3. The joys of extended Scots.

    The Scots word “crack” (conversation) found its way from Ulster Scots to the other side of the Irish border, where it was given the cod-Gaelic spelling “craic”.

  4. “…if you watch a film in Hindi, you can understand about 20% because there is so much English thrown in, not just the odd word, but whole phrases.”

    Bit like Welsh then…

  5. Actually, if you hear a conversation in English, you will occasionally hear a word of Indian origin:

    There I was, standing in the verandah outside the bungalow wearing my khaki jodhpurs and waiting for the gymkhana to start. I was due to play a couple of chukkas in the polo match. Out rushed a woman in pyjamas carrying some pukka poppadoms, chutney and a glass of punch…

    You may get the gist. Streets are usually two-way.

  6. Pretty good, EM.

    And there are doolally Indian Nationalists who would claim that virtually all English words come from India because yer Indo-European languages all sprang from India, carried forth by a torrent of Aryans. Or something to that effect.

  7. @bis

    Interesting factoid.

    As Indo-European language, Hindi and Bengali (and Punjabi, Marathi, Urdu, Gujarati, Odia and Sanskrit…) are more closely related to Icelandic, Afrikaans, Russian and Kurdish than they are to Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, or Tamil (Dravidian), Naga, Tripuri or Manipuri (Sino-Tibetan), Santali, Ho or Mundari (Austroasiatic) while the Andaman Islands have a handful of speakers still left of two of the world’s primary language families (Great Andamanese and Ongan).

    Great Andamanese languages are mostly extinct or clinging on in pidgin form with Hindi because their speakers tended to be happier integrating with the settlers. The Ongan languages are doing a bit better by dint of isolation.

    But for a sense of scale, about ten times as many people live in Chipping Ongar as there are Andamanese who still speak one of the Ongan languages – and that’s presuming the Sentinelese language belongs to that family, a question nobody has asked them and survived to tell the rest of us.

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