This is a tough one to understand

Although the Netherlands has long seen support for populists including Mr Wilders, the rise of Mr Baudet shows centrist parties may be losing their grip across Europe, Mr Pre said.

“It was always one of the old parties in the middle as something of a buffer to rule our country,” he said. But, “Wilders’ loyal voters feel he hasn’t got influence in government, and Thierry Baudet has a hard-to-describe appeal.”

Why? Why are people voting for him?

But days after a terror attack in Utrecht, his anti-immigration, anti-environmentalist and anti-EU party,

Oh.

24 comments on “This is a tough one to understand

  1. ’Mr Baudet, a former academic, was considered something of a political outsider. He brought his grand piano to work as an election pledge, last summer posted a naked holiday picture on Instagram, and has turned up in parliament in a flak jacket instead of a suit.’

    What do any of those things have to do with making him a ‘political outsider’..?

  2. Machine politics is fucked. And their cheerleaders are fucked, too. How anyone can believe that Europeans generally are prepared to put up both with being shot and stabbed and run down by Islamist nutters and being called racist for objecting to ever more of these people being allowed to live here is beyond me. The next election in New Zealand will be very interesting too. No normal person believes that the cunt who killed those people in the mosque is anything other than a cunt. But we also wonder whether the media and political reaction was proportionate, and where the western outrage and mourning is for the thousands of Christians who have died in churches and villages around the world. This is not going to end well.

  3. The backlash is happening all over Western world. The hysteria of the NZ bitch is almost exactly the wrong approach as is Macron’s pussybritches attempts at a whiff of grapeshot. That fuckwit couldn’t carry off a whiff of grapefruit.

    Now a coup against the Fish Faced Cunt is being talked up. With snakester Gove. and a cast of remainiac turds. EEA or Common Market 2. Both are remain in clown suits. And the ESpew have given nothing all along. Will they show yellow in the face of a runt like Gove. And give concessions –in front of all the other EU victim-nations–or will they say ” We arrvve hagreed ze WA–take it or leaf it No Deal”

  4. I saw a funny picture of a Tweet where someone was cheering that NZ had already banned assault rifles and Nazis (i.e .anyone right of centre). There was a reply that said: “Wow, did they even TRY thoughts and prayers?”.

    Spot on.

  5. Mr Baudet, a former academic, was considered something of a political outsider.

    Well, if he was an academic opposing mass immigration, the EU and Communism via the back door of environmentalism then he certainly was an outsider. Unique, possibly.

  6. Correct, Pat.

    It’s ‘far-Right’ vs ‘centrist.’ Seems the Left doesn’t even exist in the Netherlands.

  7. What do you call someone who’s for massive, uncontrolled immigration of the most violent and backwards people on the planet, permanent rule by a distant cabal of unaccountable transnational kleptocrats who hate you, and the deliberate destruction of your personal freedom and living standards in the name of a pathological science cult that claims it can control the weather 100 years from now?

    A centrist.

  8. When someone bans something like assault riffles as quickly as NZ has done after a tragedy it just makes me wonder how long they have had the legislation knocking around for just waiting for something to happen so they had an excuse to roll it out

  9. “Seems to me that those described in the press as “centrist” are nowhere near the centre.”

    Empirically speaking, the centre of UK politics is socially conservative, anti-immigration and favours the re-nationalisation of the railways…

  10. @JuliaM

    ‘political outsider’

    Says what he means, tries hard to deliver on promises, puts country before ideology & foreigners : Farage, Thatcher, Trump and maybe IDS & Putin

  11. Hitchens today

    …This will be the price we pay for the complete failure of our parliamentary system to reflect the fears and wishes of the British people over the past few years, culminating in the tragi-comedy of Theresa May’s premiership…

    …For the absurd Westminster manoeuvres of the past few weeks, and of the weeks to come, are not an isolated event. They are the end of a far longer process of decline and decay.

    I do not think Parliament as it now is, or our political system, will survive for very long after this.

    Each one of the repeated failures of democracy comes at a high cost. But the accumulated bill is now so great that it cannot be paid except in anger and disillusion.

    As for the Blair-Brown-Cameron era, which began in 1997 and still drags on, people are only just beginning to realise the scale of its foolishness and its crazy revolutionary radicalism.

    For most people the thing is just too big to understand. In a few short years, Britain became somewhere else. Criminal justice collapsed. The police became paramilitary social workers uninterested in the problems of the public and obsessed with sex and the internet.

    Schools failed to teach the most basic knowledge yet preached the gospel of Stonewall. The word ‘husband’ disappeared from government documents, Christianity was officially dethroned as the national religion, the beliefs of a small coven of Marxist revolutionaries became the official family policy of a great and ancient state, terrorism was bounteously rewarded with amnesties, territorial surrender and power, and its gory dead-eyed practitioners invited to white-tie dinners at Windsor Castle.

    Labour voters? Yes. It is the most astonishing fact of our past few decades that traditional Labour voters (such as Gillian Duffy, dismissed as a ‘bigoted woman’ by Gordon Brown) secured the majority for Leave.

    So we came to the end. We had a Tory Party that openly despised its supporters as fruitcakes, and a Labour Party that openly despised its supporters as bigots….

    Other than his anti Ref & Trump and lamenting “destruction” of heavy industry:
    +1

  12. Pcar – The thing about Hitch is that, while he’s pretty good at describing problems, his Sad Sack-like miserablism also makes him awful at describing solutions. Because he doesn’t believe in solutions. In practice this makes him generally worse than useless, because he actively promotes fear and self-loathing.

    A lot of what we might call right-wingers suffer from this pessimistic character flaw, they seem to luxuriate in the warm bath of failure so long as they can say “I told you so!” It’s a major reason why the Right has a pretty much uninterrupted track record of losing since 1918 or so. (Even the Thatcher interregnum largely failed to take the fight to the enemy where it is strongest – the BBC, academia, and the civil service).

    Hence this bizarre statement from the lesser Hitchens:

    I fear a British Donald Trump. I fear such a person will steal the slogans of the Right and the merciless, dishonest propaganda methods of the Left – as the US President has done. I fear that the rise of such a figure is the likely outcome of the catastrophe caused by David Cameron’s folly in calling a referendum, and everyone else’s folly – of walking into such an obvious trap.

    It’s difficult to know where to begin with such a pathetic admission of weakness. Of course, we would be incredibly lucky to have a Trump – who is, by the way, a profoundly moderate and sensible leader whose policies wouldn’t have caused so much as a batted eyelid had a mainstream Democrat espoused them circa 1992.

    The only thing that makes Trump sound extreme is his aggressive – often crude – rhetoric, which is partly his New York real estate developer persona, partly a necessity for survival in a media ecosystem which routinely monsters and destroys right-of-centre public figures who betray the slightest hint of weakness in the face of their weaponised outrage campaigns.

    But Peter fears the end of civilisation if someone stops cowering and simpering while the BBC calls them racist, or something:

    AND worst of all, I fear that such a person, and his supporters, will bring our long age of free civilisation to an end. […]

    From now on, democracy will be about a sullen, cheated, resentful majority wishing to make sure that everyone else now suffers as much as it has been suffering. We are moving from the politics of self-improvement to the politics of vengeance and spite, conspiracy theories, scapegoats and calls for the jailing and humiliation of the defeated.

    Where has he been since 1997? A large part of our politics has been based on hatred and spite since the grinning jackanape and his coalition of Metropolitan wankers, ethnic narcissists and carpetbagging perverts decided they didn’t like normal British people and it was time to “rub their noses in it”.

    I feel like I need to start selling watches where the big hand says “Who?” and the little hand bears the legend “Whom?” as an aide-memoire to dozy conservatives who still think we’re living in the Oxford Union circa Brideshead Revisited.

    When someone repeatedly kicks you in the balls, it’s not helpful or even sane to fret about the decline of manners. Splendid Scottish thesp Sean Connery was right, as usual:

    He pulls a knife, you pull a gun. He sends one of yours to the hospital, you send one of his to the morgue! That’s the Chicago way…

  13. Steve,
    There are no democratic solutions, because, as Brexit illustrates, you can’t make the cunts do something they don’t want to do. e.g.

    1)Reduce the size of government to something we can afford.
    2)Remove foreigners that hate us.
    3)End anti white male discrimination.

    At this point it’s unpleasantness or decline, with the latter being the most likely.

  14. Edward – Thanks! No?

    Roue – Of course there are. You’re commenting on a thread about democratic solutions.

  15. Steve

    Do you have an image of yourself that I can put in a little niche and make votive offerings to?

  16. I wonder if Nigel has it in him to fight a GE here as a Brexit party. Trouble is, as UKIP showed, it’s not enough to have one policy. It would need to show reasonable & credible policies on a raft of other issues as well. Hard, because though we (and Nigel) might be right of centre (whatever that is these days), a lot of Leave voters came from Labour & probably still want significant State intervention.

    Whatever, it would be good for most or all constituencies to have a candidate that wishes Brexit to happen as was promised us after the referendum if neither Con or Lab have a Leave supporter.

  17. I’m thinking a GE with both main parties offering soft BRINO options so they can then claim they have a mandate afterwards

  18. @Steve March 24, 2019 at 9:52 pm

    +1

    P Hitchens: he does seem to want UK to still resemble John Major’s “cricket, women on bicycles, church” speech

    Given how he loathes EU, Blair, Hellary, fake Conservatives, open-borders….; his anti EU Ref, Thatcher and Trump is weird. He’s right on a lot, but when he’s wrong he’s very wrong.

    He was on QT and stated “EU: copy Norway; no free movement, no payments, choose which laws/rules to enact”

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