So there, English

To all the politicians dutifully wishing the nation a happy St George’s Day — you’ve got the date wrong.

The Church of England has confirmed that the feast has been pushed back to next Monday because of a clash with Easter week.

April 23 is the usual date each year for the feast of St George, the patron saint of England, but church rules state that no feast days should be marked during Easter week. If a saint’s day falls during Easter week, it is “translated” to the following week.

Matthew Salisbury, the Church of England’s national liturgy and worship adviser, said: “St George’s Day is translated to April 29 as nothing other than a principal feast would take place during Easter week.”

Common Worship, the church’s volumes of guidance for services, notes: “When St George’s Day or St Mark’s Day falls between Palm Sunday and the second Sunday of Easter inclusive it is transferred to the Monday after the second Sunday of Easter.”

20 comments on “So there, English

  1. This year Easter is almost the latest it is possible to be. The news has been full of reports of “hottest Easter ever”. No sign of any connection with the fact that this year’s Easter is almost the most summer-season-y possible, and three weeks later than last year when it was barely out of winter

  2. The pols can make it whatever date they want. Push it back as far as they want. Or not. It’s all up to them.

    Teaches us oiks who is really boss, d’ y’ see?

  3. Mr Homewood lets fly:

    “To put this Easter into perspective, the highest temperature recorded over the weekend was 77.9F at Gosport on Saturday. It was also the hottest day of the month.

    However this was way below the temperature set at Camden on Easter Saturday in 1949 of 85F, which is also the highest April temperature on record in the UK.

    Not only that, but the weather in April 1893 was every bit as remarkable as in 1949 …

    As this week, there was an extended spell of high pressure bringing in winds from the continent, and temperatures reached 84F in Cambridge on the 20th.”

  4. “Matthew Salisbury, the Church of England’s national liturgy and worship adviser, said: ‘St George’s Day is translated to April 29 as nothing other than a principal feast would take place during Easter week.'”

    We English Catholics have to wait a day further, to 30th April, because St Catherine of Siena, patron saint of Europe, is on 29th; St George has to wait for the next free day when there’s nothing high-ranking.

  5. The C of E sets saint’s days? Surely not, the Holy See might have something to say about that, them being the ones who issue sainthoods.

  6. If the CofE thought that the “translation” of St. George’s day was such a big deal you would think that they would have given everyone a bit more notice. Making an announcement when the day has more or less already happened makes it look like a bit of an afterthought.

  7. ‘We English Catholics have to wait a day further, to 30th April, because St Catherine of Siena, patron saint of Europe, is on 29th; St George has to wait for the next free day when there’s nothing high-ranking.’

    So that’s where TM got the idea for her Brexit strategy from, she is a vicars daughter so likely aware of moving set dates when it suits a higher calendar

  8. They were talking about this on the radio.

    Apparently even though the day is pushed back a week, the day to fly the lag stays the same.

    No, I don’t understand either.

  9. A couple more occasions and the church will adopt the pagan ritual and subdue their own beliefs. They have history.

  10. St George was beheaded in the Diocletian persecution in 303 AD.

    King Edward III made him the Patron Saint of England when he formed the Order of the Garter in St. George’s name in 1350, and the cult of the Saint was further advanced by King Henry V, at the battle of Agincourt in northern France.

    An interesting story in the Order of the Garter is the story of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

    It describes how Sir Gawain, a knight of King Arthur’s Round Table, accepts a challenge from a mysterious “Green Knight” who challenges any knight to strike him with his axe if he will take a return blow in a year and a day. Gawain accepts and beheads him with his blow, at which the Green Knight stands up, picks up his head and reminds Gawain of the appointed time. In his struggles to keep his bargain, Gawain demonstrates chivalry and loyalty until his honour is called into question by a test involving Lady Bertilak, the lady of the Green Knight’s castle.

    In the Movie Star Wars, Yoda is green, even his light sabre in green, and he lives next to the cave of Dagobah, whose dark force he uses to mask his light force, making him subtle. The story alludes to al-Khidr, the mysterious figure mentioned in the 18th Sura of the Qur’an titled “The Cave”, where his is missed on account of being subtle by Moses and his servant. Here, a fish which was brought along for food comes back to life and swims away, a symbol of the fountain of youth. It is the noticing of the loss of the fish which makes Moses and his servant retrace their footsteps back to where they lost the fish.

    al-Khidr is Arabic for “the green one”. He is the one prophet who never dies and is said to be always present in the earth. The colour green is a symbol of eternal life.

  11. Further to my comment, from Wikipedia: The Green Knight

    Taking this into consideration, scientists have considered an association with Islamic tales. The figure of Al-Khidr (Arabic: الخضر‎) in the Qur’an is called the “Green Man” because he obtain immortality as the only man to have drunk the water of life which in some versions of the story turns him green. He tests Moses three times by doing seemingly evil acts, which are eventually revealed to be noble deeds to prevent greater evils or reveal great goods. Both the Arthurian Green Knight and Al-Khidr serve as teachers to holy and upright men (Gawain/Moses), who thrice tested their faith and obedience. It has been suggested that the character of the Green Knight may be a literary descendant of Al-Khidr, brought to Europe with the Crusaders and blended with Celtic and Arthurian imagery.

  12. Yes, of course St George was islamic. He being executed more than three centuries before time of the paedophile, mass-murdering, genocidal bandit Mo.

  13. Only Green Man I’ve ever heard of serves an excellent Abbot, straight from the keg. None of this beer engine nonsense.

  14. When I were a student of literature, it was generally agreed the Green Man originated in Celtic myth. Not a fat lot to do with Mo the nonce.

    But of course with green being the colour of Islam, then all things green are Islamic. Which explains why my yucca plant keeps trying to stone my gay mate Mark to death.

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