Like, you know, getting stonkingly rich?

Top graduates are no longer flocking to the City of London as banks and finance firms are losing out to trendier businesses in technology and other more fashionable industries, bosses fear.

Dame Helena Morrissey, head of personal investing at Legal and General Investment Management, said her son’s generation did not see the City as an attractive destination with financial services “the 12th choice for graduates” by industry.

At a time of high employment and a growing skills shortage, workers have an increasing choice of jobs and careers. For younger workers in particular this means they can choose companies that match their values….

And thus the rush to tech companies and their stock awards…..

And wouldn’t it be fun if the standardisation of workers equity came from that free market competition for these bright young things? Spread across the economy as a result of peeps trying to compete with tech?

9 comments on “Like, you know, getting stonkingly rich?

  1. The problem is that boring=low paid. And the problem with banking is that it’s pretty much done.

    Like, retail banking and insurance went through an era of massive technological change from the 1970s to the mid-2000s. Writing the software for that, designing processes for that, was all a big challenge.

    But nothing’s really changing. This stuff is about a business that’s ticking over now. You don’t need brilliant people for that. It’s why there’s women creeping into running banks.

  2. Some time ago now, an ex-colleague mentioned that it (the City) just wasn’t much fun anymore. Certainly, walking through it at going home time last summer, it struck me as dowdy and frumpy. All the totty seemed to be in Shoreditch and Farringdon.

    At a guess, all the regulatory changes post the crash, have given the BPOs the upper hand. The greedy bankers meme has probably had a major effect as well.

  3. Probably a good space for some ambitious types then.

    Moving to where the competition is soft has merits.

  4. Do tech companies in the UK pay in stock? I thought that was a Silicon Valley thing, partly for tax reasons.

  5. Dame Helena Morrissey, head of personal investing at Legal and General Investment Management, said her son’s generation did not see the City as an attractive destination with financial services “the 12th choice for graduates” by industry.

    Nothing to do with the financial sector becoming infested with SJW types in HR and enacting affirmative action policies which openly discriminate against white men, then?

    See here.

  6. ***Smiths Mode Activated***

    Dame Helena Morrissey, head of personal investing at Legal and General Investment Management, said “Is it wrong not to always be glad? […] Boot the grime of this world in the crotch, dear.”

  7. For younger workers in particular this means they can choose companies that match their values…

    Then they find the pay is shit, they work for people who exploit these ‘values’ for their own ends, they finally they discover their actual values, the ones that emerge after getting up early to go to work every day, and decide on a new job that more closely matches these new values, in the City.

  8. Don’t forget of course that the children of Dame Morrissey and her circle will be fucking loaded and so not have to worry about getting a job which runs against their ‘values’ (I.e. rampant virtue signalling).

  9. “Don’t forget of course that the children of Dame Morrissey and her circle will be fucking loaded and so not have to worry about getting a job which runs against their ‘values’ (I.e. rampant virtue signalling).”

    Usually in government funded charities until they have enough “experience “ to work for or even run a quango.

Leave a Reply

Name and email are required. Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.