Just another split in Judaism

Rabbis will share duties with women for the first time as the Chief Rabbi says there is a “real need” within the Jewish community for females to be put in a position to offer others advice.

Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis launched his new scheme, known as the Ma’aynot Project for female Jewish leaders, in a bid to create roles for women within modern orthodox Judaism. Female rabbis are not permitted within orthodox Judaism, unlike in more liberal denomination such as Reform and Liberal Judaism.

There is in fact no central doctrinal body within Judaism. There are many interpretations.

So, some will accept this and others won’t. Just as there is now orthodox, reform, liberal, there will now be reform, liberal, orthodox accepting women rabbis and orthodox not accepting women rabbis.

Rabbis share duties with women for first time, in ‘turning point’ for Judaism

Thus it’s not for the first time and it’s not a turning point. It’s just another fraction.

20 comments on “Just another split in Judaism

  1. Well, yes, but sometimes the splits peter out.

    There was a split about saying the Mass in Latin. But the traditionalists couldn’t hold their numbers. It just seemed silly to the younger generation. Now the Catholic church allows Latin Mass, but the vernacular is overwhelmingly the norm, if only because most Priests don’t have the Latin..

    I expect the same here. Old timers will hold out while they live. Once they die, their holding out will just seem silly.

    If there’s no actual prohibition, just tradition, it won’t last.

  2. I rathe expect teh Ultra-Orthodox to keep the old ways. And as they tend to be much more fecund don’t see it dying out….

  3. the Chief Rabbi says there is a “real need” within the Jewish community for females to be put in a position to offer others advice.

    Because hitherto, Jewish mums have been famously reticent to offer advice.

    in a bid to create roles for women within modern orthodox Judaism

    They already have a number of roles in orthodox Judaism: daughter, wife, mother. Changing Hebrew to Webrew is just gonna make God angrier at the Jews than He already is over the films of Adam Sandler.

    Chester – Now the Catholic church allows Latin Mass, but the vernacular is overwhelmingly the norm

    Empty pews are now the norm. Every Christian denomination that embraced 20th century style “modernisation” is diminished or dying.

  4. It’s down for me too at present. But it’s Sunday morning, our tech department (otherwise known as Richard) isn’t mobile as yet.

  5. Steve @ Chester

    “Empty pews are now the norm. Every Christian denomination that embraced 20th century style “modernisation” is diminished or dying.”

    Correct. And the fastest growing segment of the Catholic Church is the traditional. In France they are just about to overtake, a number of priests, non-traditional. The same thing applies to the monastic and women’s religious orders: those that are traditional – wimples, habits et cetera – are growing. Those that look like abunch of aged and grumpy HR professionals are dying out .

  6. So, dramas such as The Attractive Young Rabbi passed them by? (Think Vicar of Dibley but Jewish.)

  7. Is it also going to be compulsory to have the appalling pudding-basin haircuts that Anglican women priests all seem to have ?

  8. My wife converted to catholic a couple of years ago, said she wanted to go to a church that still believed in God. Also their range of services is very handy when you work shifts and can’t commit to a set time every Sunday

  9. @BnLiCCV
    Our Curate’s hair is down to her shoulder-blades unless she puts it up. So, not *all* of them.

  10. “Empty pews are now the norm. Every Christian denomination that embraced 20th century style “modernisation” is diminished or dying.”

    Not surprising, really. Religion sells on fear. Religious people want to be told what to do with consequences if they don’t. It requires an angry, vindictive deity. A happy-clappy church with a love & daisies deity ain’t going to inspire dread. So what’s the point in going?

  11. “Rabbis will share duties with women for the first time . . . ”

    “Female rabbis are not permitted within orthodox Judaism, unlike in more liberal denomination such as Reform and Liberal Judaism.”

    So, which is it Telegraph? Are they sharing duties for the first time or have they been sharing duties for a long time now?

    Feth. You’d think a ‘professional news organization’ could hire writers that don’t contradict themselves within two paragraphs.

  12. @Steve June 16, 2019 at 8:22 am

    Empty pews are now the norm. Every Christian denomination that embraced 20th century style “modernisation” is diminished or dying.

    +1

    “modernisation” drove me away. The last straw was Remembrance Sunday where none of the traditional hymns were on board – I walked out after the 2 min silence.

  13. @Agammamon and @Tim:

    This is in no way the creation of female rabbis.

    The duties being shared are non-liturgical duties: education and counseling. There is no contradiction between the two statements you quote.

    In traditional Jewish societies, the counseling duty was often carried out by the “rebetzin”, the Rabbi’s wife. My guess is that in very traditional (“haredi”) communities this is still the case.

    There is a reason why these women are being called “Ma’aynot” and not rabbis: It is because they are not rabbis.

  14. “Thus it’s not for the first time and it’s not a turning point. It’s just another fraction.” A vulgar fraction?

    Do female rabbis/leaders dispense copious quantities of chicken soup when giving advice?

  15. As far as as I recall, Julia Neuberger was years ago in London one of the first woman Reform Rabbis in Europe?

  16. “Peter S. Shenkin
    June 16, 2019 at 9:00 pm

    @Agammamon and @Tim:

    This is in no way the creation of female rabbis.

    The duties being shared are non-liturgical duties: education and counseling. There is no contradiction between the two statements you quote.

    In traditional Jewish societies, the counseling duty was often carried out by the “rebetzin”, the Rabbi’s wife. My guess is that in very traditional (“haredi”) communities this is still the case.

    There is a reason why these women are being called “Ma’aynot” and not rabbis: It is because they are not rabbis.”

    Then there is still contradiction there – the thing the article writer says is happening for the first time now is actually common practice and has been for a long time.

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