So, what can we say about this young lady?

Poppy was born two weeks early at Worthing Hospital, weighing 7lb 9oz, on April 3.

Khiara, who lives with her partner Sam Tarrant, 23, baby Poppy, and son Hugo, four, is no stranger to having contractions during exams.

The student, who is originally from Shoreham, was pregnant with Hugo during her final years of GCSEs.

She’s an elephant? How many years does a human pregnancy last?

11 comments on “So, what can we say about this young lady?

  1. Erhm, two different kids. Or I’m not reading the same thing as you.

    Sounds like a tough – and rational – cookie: “easier to sit an exam with labour pains than a screaming baby”. Only twenty and already got the childbirth behind her, career ahead. I increasingly suspect this is the ‘right’ way to do it.

  2. You could get pregnant in September and give birth in May. Technically ‘years’ in that you have been pregnant during two years.

    Although of course GCSEs last two years (correct?) so ‘final years’ doesn’t make sense.

    It’s crap English anyway, but no surprise in the modern media.

  3. “She picked up her Tens machine, a device that uses a mild electrical current to help reduce pain”

    not really …it’s placebo at best woo. Surprised/not surprised it;s offered by the NHS.

  4. If ee’s the father of your babbies, ee’s your husband not your “partner”. Don’t care about any bit of paper.

    Talking of which, you’ve got four kids, SIGN A BIT OF PAPER!!!!! Don’t care what bit of paper it is, but it’s child abuse/spouse abuse to not put legal protections in place to protect each other. Ten quid for an off-the-shelf will from your nearest CAB is enough.

  5. Hugo and Poppy seem to be rather middle class names for parents named Khiara and Tarrant, or am I just out of touch?

  6. “I increasingly suspect this is the ‘right’ way to do it.”

    Yes. Drop sprogs at 15-18, start higher ejumucashun at lastsprog+7. But that would need some creative thinking in terms of transferring future income into the now (and making people pay it back later without disincentivising said paying back).

    “it’s placebo at best woo. Surprised/not surprised it;s offered by the NHS.”

    Some woo is astonishingly effective. And people sent away without woo keep coming back demanding not woo. So it’s cost-effective too.

    “it’s child abuse/spouse abuse to not put legal protections in place to protect each other”

    Surely the legal stuff these days only protects one party?

  7. BiG, I think it was Richard Leakey who told an annecdote of highly effective woo dispensed by a museum in Nairobi. Local folklore held that possession of a lion’s whisker guaranteed a pregnant woman a safe delivery. When the museum mounted a lion’s head on the wall its whiskers were regularly appropriated and the periodically replaced nylon ones proved just as sought after.

  8. The Natural History Museum has an annexe* at Tring full of stuffed/preserved animals, many of them taken from the collection of a Rothschild who lived nearby. One of the exhibits is a rhino’s head mounted in traditional style. A year or so ago, there was a break-in and a chainsaw used to remove the (presumed valuable) rhino horn. (Un)fortunately, it had been replaced by a wooden replica some years earlier.

    * recommended if you’re in the vicinity

  9. @john 77
    Shouldn’t age at point of conception be more relevant than age when child is born

  10. @ BniC
    Yes, which is why the Barclay-brothers-owned UKIPgraph carefully only mentions the latter. She is still 20, her son is four-and-a-bit ….

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