Because, because

Just 34.4% of cases referred by the police to the CPS during 2018-19 resulted in a charge – in 2014 the rate was 62%.

Despite a sharp increase in the number of rapes being reported to the police, far fewer defendants were prosecuted and convicted of the crime last year.

There is some number of rapes in the country each year. Far too many, obviously, one is too many.

There are always some rapes where the facts cannot be established. Not sufficiently to lead to a conviction at least. Sad but there we are, an inevitable byproduct of having to prove guilt beyond reasonable doubt.

So, assume the number of rapes doesn’t change. The reports of rapes rise. What’s likely to happen to hte conviction rate? It’ll fall, right? Because the increase in reporting is likely to be of the marginal cases.

It’s not despite therefore, it’s because.

7 comments on “Because, because

  1. Me Too and look-at-them-sideways=rape Marxist feminist deceit will serve to increase the numbers of bogus claims.

    More imported crims will also do it–but of course a certain grouping already is being allowed to get away with lots of antics that TPTB don’t want to know about. Both white girls and in house. So blowing hard about other stats is just the usual evil politicking by the scummy left.

  2. Part of the reduction may be due to a growing recognition that there is such a thing as coition contrition.

  3. ‘The most senior police officer for rape in England and Wales’

    Shouldn’t he be against it?

    What would be the correct number of men to lock up for rape each year? Why bother with trials at all?

  4. ‘Concerns were raised that it had shifted away from the “merits-based approach” of prosecuting, which requires prosecutors to make decisions guided by the quality of the evidence rather than by a perception of how a prejudiced jury might respond to evidence.’

    Yep, prosecutors should pursue cases that they know damn well no jury would convict.

    The number of men (presumably) convicted of rape has gone down. Why isn’t that a good thing? Because Topping et al couldn’t care less about guilt or innocence.

  5. Or maybe they have extended the definition beyond what the public sees as reasonable so juries aren’t convicting.
    Take drunkenness when both sides are equally drunk, technically law may allow an accusation of rape but a lot of reasonable people may find it hard to blame one side over the other. Or as mentioned above coition contrition, a step too far

  6. This is all warming us up for jury selection and training prior to rape trials:

    Dr Nina Burrowes, a psychologist and activist against sexual violence, investigates the recent calls for UK courts to scrap the use of juries in rape trials. She examines how so-called “rape myths” impact jurors’ decision making.

    Dr Dominic Willmott discusses the research he’s conducted on common misunderstandings and misconceptions about rape and the effect they have on how a jury reaches a verdict.

    or even removing juries (you’ll never guess who’s advocating this one and in which paper ;)).

    The conviction rates for rape have long been shockingly low. This is what has led one Labour MP, Ann Coffey, today to suggest doing away with juries in rape trials.

    I support this. Prevailing rape myths, such as “she was asking for it”, “he’s handsome, and does not ‘need’ to rape”, and “if she didn’t want it she would close her legs”, can poison the mind of a juror against the complainant, whatever the evidence against the defendant. Women and girls are routinely blamed for being raped, which means the perpetrator, even when it is abundantly clear that he is guilty, is too often absolved. That is how patriarchy works: keep females in a constant state of fear of male violence, and then put the responsibility for it firmly on their shoulders.

  7. Conviction rate has improved. But that’s not what they really want.

    Prosecutors taking better cases to juries improves conviction rate.

    “Dammit! We want you to prosecute the bad cases, too! We’re talking about RAPE here! Do you hate women?”

Leave a Reply

Name and email are required. Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.