Isn’t this cruel

After #MeToo, I wondered if my real problem with young feminists was how little they seemed to need us older ones. As far as I could see, they didn’t even want to know us

And we all thought it was the patriarchy that meant past-fertile women became invisible. Yet no, it’s those who still retain that ability who blank those who don’t.

Tsk, really, tsk.

16 comments on “Isn’t this cruel

  1. This is a real break with the past – the 1960s feminists paid careful attention to the wisdom of their mothers and grandmothers, and held the conservative opinions of elderly women in great respect.

    Ha ha, no, joking of course! They treated them precisely as they are being treated now.

  2. “That we have come so far in so little time is a marvel. That we should expect all the kinks to have been worked out by now is insane.”

    With age comes wisdom….sometimes.

  3. I’m not going to even try to summarize the events of that fall or list the men who went down in the spill of #MeToo.

    So far it’s Harvey Weinstein and about 3 others, right? Maybe half a dozen in total. Otherwise the ‘movement’ achieved the square root of fuck all, except contributing to frostier relations between the sexes and encouraging more than a few entrepreneurs to inwardly resolve to never hire a woman.

    Reading that drivel and the ‘renaissancecore’ article has quite turned me against women voting.

  4. I remember being dumped on Delancey Street, kissed on Charles Street, having a strange and short-lived personal assistant job in a musty apartment on Sutton Place.

    Holy shit, it’s the menopausal Roy Batty.

    Strangely enough, her lifestyle choices of moving to the big city and treating cocks like Uber, then refusing to have children with her husband, then divorce, don’t seem to have made her happy.

    Damn you, Patriarchy!

  5. “I remember being dumped on Delancey Street, kissed on Charles Street, having a strange and short-lived personal assistant job in a musty apartment on Sutton Place.”

    Mornington Crescent!

  6. @ Andrew M

    Surely that move wouldn’t be allowed unless you were playing after authorising use of the Southwark method*?

    (*An open variation, remembering that if pairing occurs during positional play after a neutral move when all the diagonals are quartered then the overboard player must sacrifice Fairlop in order to progress or risk passing at a secondary tangent.)

  7. After #MeToo, I wondered if my real problem with young feminists was how little they seemed to need us older ones. As far as I could see, they didn’t even want to know us

    Evidently the market’s tapped out for bitter middle-aged lesbians.

    Quelle Suprise!

  8. To be 20 years old in 1990 in New York City was, as far as I was concerned, to own the world.

    To paraphrase Robert Stacey McCain, if you think Sodom or Gomorrah are the sort of city you’d like, you deserve everything that comes your way.

  9. Until 1960, the idea that women could compete with men in the job market, that men should do housework, that women had any purpose in life higher than having babies and men had any purpose higher than financially supporting those babies or going to war to protect them, was something close to unthinkable.

    That’s pure ignorant bullshit. The 40 year old woman in 1960 had most probably had a job during WW2 that far exceeded what any man of a similar age would have had during peacetime. Tens of thousands of young and middle-aged women had worked in war industries. Rosie the Riveter wasn’t some made up thing… It was feminine reality at a time when nearly all young, able-bodied males were in the military.

  10. @DtP

    WWI too.

    A few minutes idle googling reveals that

    In the UK in 1918, nearly 47% of women of working age were in employment (and that percentage excludes those employed in domestic service) (even before the war the % had been around 25%).
    Women workers on London trams/buses and the underground went on strike in 1918 over equal pay (and won).

    Obviously things changed when the war ended and men returned from active service but, as you imply, the women workers didn’t simply disappear as people, or forget the roles they’d played.

  11. @ Andrew C

    I just recently saw a short documentary on making ammunition at the Federal Ammunition company plant in the US, filmed sometime in the late ’60s.

    There were a surprisingly large number of women, and not just in quality control and packaging, but also on the main production line, running big production machinery. All were in their mid-late ’40s, and it occurred to me that many of them may have been hired during the war, and simply stayed on afterwards.

  12. @Dennis the Peasant October 16, 2019 at 3:06 pm

    +1

    Female employment took of during WWI – except small businesses where husband & wife both worked for centuries.

    Both my grandmothers worked in 1950s – one in a department store, the other in husband and wife bakery & cafe

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