Guardian fun

So Gary Younge says:

For along with Trump’s personal frailties is a series of political characteristics that underpins his anomie. He is a misogynist, a racist, a xenophobe and a nationalist. Those are not psychological descriptors but political ones, fortified by systems and ideology.

And:

This was not because people didn’t see those things, but because they either didn’t care, cared about other things more, preferred him to the alternative, or simply didn’t show up. As such, his victory marked a high point for the naked appeal of white supremacy in particular and rightwing populism in general, and a low point for the centre-left, neoliberal agenda.

Which gets changed by the subeditors, in the subheading, to:

To reduce his presidency to a frail mind is to ignore the fact he’s an emblem of free-market, white supremacist nationalism

Younge may be many things but he’s not stupid enough to add free market to Trump’s list of failings. Nor to think that free market is equal or part of white supremacy, nationalism and the rest.

The Guardian’s subeditors are that stupid.

19 comments on “Guardian fun

  1. For Younge to call anyone else racist is the pot calling the kettle … Errr.

    He’s the most blatantly racist columnist the Guardian has!

  2. So all the black folks voting for Obama because ‘he’s going to pay my bills’ is just fine and dandy, but all the white folk voting for Trump because he (might) stand up for their interests is racist………..

  3. Not stupid, no. That looks deliberate.

    If they are being stupid, it’s thinking that we are even more stupid and won’t be able to spot it.

  4. Trump’s recent Dallas rally audience was 11% Hispanic. And some black people vote for the white supremacist too. Is there so little to criticize Trump for that they have to make stuff up? How about a serious analysis without the dog whistle detectors which work so badly for the MSM?

  5. For Guardianistas, the biggest atrocity they can imagine is white people acting or voting in their own self-interest.

    In a world where identity politics is the norm, this is precisely what white people must do.

  6. Too bad we can’t make an army with all the Trump straw men they have made.

    [link bad. goes to XR article]

  7. JuliaM +1, though Afufu Hirsch is a worthy challenger in the hating wypipo stakes.

    He is a misogynist, a racist, a xenophobe and a nationalist.

    So you’re saying he could be president of literally any African country? Blimey.

  8. “Nor to think that free market is equal or part of white supremacy, nationalism and the rest.”

    Can we be sure about that? Very many of his fellow travellers make that explicit connection.

  9. Like Owen Jones, you can imagine he writes his articles by recording himself screaming hysterically, rending his hair and staring wildly at people.

  10. First of all, let’s note that Gary Younge is the British version of the common North American House Negro (not the actual descriptor, but one must think of woggies with delicate sensibilities, mustn’t one?). From that, all else flows…

    He is a misogynist, a racist, a xenophobe and a nationalist. Those are not psychological descriptors but political ones, fortified by systems and ideology.

    In this House Negro Younge is completely correct, though not in the way he thinks. Trump is deemed a misogynist, racist, and xenophobe not because he is actually any of those things, but because leftist identity politics demands that any disagreement over policy be expressed in terms of, well, identity politics.

    This was not because people didn’t see those things, but because they either didn’t care, cared about other things more, preferred him to the alternative, or simply didn’t show up. As such, his victory marked a high point for the naked appeal of white supremacy in particular and rightwing populism in general, and a low point for the centre-left, neoliberal agenda.

    Note that sentence #2 does not logically follow sentence #1. It’s strange that House Negro Younge states that people don’t see “those things” in one sentence that then states that Trump’s victory marks the triumph of the “naked appeal of white supremacy” and “rightwing populism”. He then goes on to list differing priorities, personal preference and indifference as factors in Trump’s rise. None of those seem to suggest the triumph of white supremacy or rightwing populism.

    Timmy’s contention, while accurate, misses the point: House Negro Younge’s thesis is irredeemably stupid whether you include free markets or not, in that it ignores the fact that Trump as advanced policy positions that have lowered unemployment, expanded labor force participation, boosted real wages, increased median incomes for minorities, lowered minority poverty rates and lowered African-American and Latino unemployment levels to historic lows. It never occurs to House Negro Younge that economic and financial factors might enter into people’s voting decisions. Why? Because in identity politics, economic and financial factors are always – always – secondary (at best) to race, ethnicity, sexuality and gender.

    Gary Younge doesn’t give a shit about African-Americans Latinos or racism; what he gives a shit about is protecting his status as a House Negro. As such, what is important to him is doing what is necessary to stay in the house and out of the field. And trotting out tired, ineffective tropes in a paper that normal folk don’t take seriously is just of the sort of thing to keep him in the house.

    We are in an age where accusations of racism simply don’t mean anything anymore. When you have a Latino Democrat (AOC) accusing Democrat House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of being a racist one week, and then accusing Republican President Donald Trump of being a racist the next – which is exactly what she has done in 2019 – the whole idea of racism is reduced to meaninglessness. Note that the one thing Donald Trump – who is as thin-skinned as they get – never responds to is being called a racist. He understands that it simply doesn’t mean a thing anymore.

    Identity politics has run its course in terms of effectiveness. House Negro Younge’s stupidity centers around that fact.

  11. Sunday Times Fun

    ‘We persecute foxes for invading our streets. But just ask yourself who was there first.’

    This was the headline in this week’s Sunday Times promoting an ecologist called Adele Beard who labours to prove that urban foxes are no trouble to man, beast, bird or baby in any way.

    Ask yourself, as requested by the headline, ‘who was there first’? The answer is, men. Men, not foxes, built the streets.

    This created enormous food opportunities for scavenging, so foxes came. It seems logical to suppose that there were far fewer foxes when there were fewer streets and much less intensive rearing of chickens. What would there have been for large numbers of them to eat? We know from the phenomenon of the ‘bagged fox’ that foxes were rarer in the 18th century than they are today. Mankind provided much of the habitat.

    Note that Ms Beard’s arguments in favour of animals would, if made about human beings, be denounced as fascist and racist. The ‘who was there first’ is the classic line of anti-immigration nativists.
    Charles Moore https://www.spectator.co.uk/2019/10/donald-trump-is-key-to-boris-johnsons-survival/

  12. In a democracy, the voters get to decide who to vote for based on any criteria they want.

    Younge is declaring he is anti-democracy. “We tried democracy, but it didn’t work. The people kept making bad choices.”

    ‘As the threat of impeachment leaves him more isolated’

    In your dreams.

    It is an impeachment show . . . Kabuki Theater. Younge is sucked in with the rest of the Left believing because they want it so bad. Pelosi’s process is not impeachment.

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