Eh?

When Saracens rugby player Jade Knight ran her first 5km after the birth of her son, she was plagued by urinary incontinence. Pregnancy and birth had caused a weak pelvic floor – the group of muscles that span the bottom of the pelvis – leading to stress incontinence, a condition affecting around a third of mothers.

Embarrassed, Knight religiously wore black leggings when she returned to training out of fear she would leak in front of her team-mates. “Unless I speak about it I don’t think anyone else is going to,” she says. Even as a qualified midwife, she was astounded at the toll pregnancy had taken on her body.

With a severe lack of evidence and information on how exercise impacts post-partum sportswomen,

How old are Kegel weights now?

That is, this is hardly an unknown, is it?

Well boo hoo

The Duchess of Sussex has spoken of the “really challenging” time of being a new mother in the spotlight, saying “it’s a very real thing to be going through behind the scenes”.

The Duchess, who appears emotional on screen, said pregnancy is a “really vulnerable” time, adding not many people had asked after her wellbeing.

In an on-camera interview for an ITV documentary about the Sussex’s tour to Africa, she conceded it had been a “struggle”.

One of the most privileged women in the world wants to tell us how hard it all is.

Bollocks love.

We’ve got your problem right here Emma

Sgt Emma Slade, who has responsibility for policing prostitution in Avon and Somerset, said: “Vulnerable women are being enslaved and exploited for sex within pop-up brothels. They are isolated and suffer terrible abuse. Many of the women are recruited and trafficked on false promises of legitimate work but find themselves in a very different circumstance.”

Slade said that when police carried out safeguarding visits to brothels, they often found women from the far east and eastern Europe who spoke no English and did not know the emergency services phone number.

That someone is from the Far East or Eastern Europe does not mean they’re enslaved. It simply means they’ve moved from there to here to rent out their gonads.

Sex slavery is appalling, a vile crime, repeated rape. Migration to be a tart in a higher paying market might be something that you disapprove of but it’s not even a crime.

The surprise here is what?

Only one out of every 25 pupils in schools for those with behavioural difficulties or exclusions managed to gain passes in English and maths GCSEs this year, according to national data which also shows little headway being made in improving overall exam results.

People who don’t study don’t pass exams.

And?

Eh?

‘God, I was disgusting!’ – Ali Wong on why women’s bodies are the last taboo

They are? I thought we had rather more public display and conversation about them than ever before.

Why is it still so taboo for women to talk about bodily functions and all the fluids and secretions that ooze out of us?

What taboos about what secretions?

Oh, sure, the Guardian and the like are full of pieces shouting that “We’ve got to talk about menstruation. Why aren’t we?” but they get all huffy when told that by having just published 1200 words on the subject – for the dysmenorrheac 30th straight day in a row – they are in fact talking about menstruation.

True, the male conversation on the subject would be limited to “It happens. Cool.” but taboo? Today?

But what’s wrong with chlorinated chicken?

There is a real risk that the coming general election could be the United Kingdom’s last – with Boris Johnson remembered only for being its last Conservative prime minister. Johnson’s deal is, we now know, even more fatally flawed than Theresa May’s in vital respects: it threatens to make Ireland a smugglers’ and tax avoiders’ paradise and ushers in a race to the bottom in social and environmental standards. All Labour MPs must vote against it. The deal also threatens to Balkanise Britain. Northern Ireland is, for example, exempted from the evil consequences of a US-UK trade deal – from the entry of chlorinated chicken to the contracting out of NHS services – while Scotland, Wales and England would be bound in.

If people don’t want to eat it then they won’t buy it. So, what’s the problem with it being on the shelves?

Either people want it, in which case they should have it, or they don’t and the availability makes no difference.

That social divide

One of the two activists who climbed on top of a train at Canning town can exclusively be revealed as Mark Ovland, who had already been arrested and released “several times” this week.

The 36-year-old has been identified as the man chased along a train roof before being pulled down onto the platform.

He describes himself as a full-time Extinction Rebellion protestor who gave up his Buddhist studies to devote himself to climate change action.

Can’t think of any grants available for Buddhist studies. So, a man of private means then.

Telling people in Canning Town they can’t get to work.

Yep, that’ll work well.

Accuracy in sourcing quotes

Well, yes:

Peter Navarro, an economist who has written a number of books on China, has employed Ron Vara as a source in at least five of his works, quoting his anti-Beijing views.

OK:

Mr Navarro batted away criticism of his Ron Vara character, comparing it to director Alfred Hitchcock’s cameos in his own movies.

It was, he told the Chronicle, “refreshing that somebody finally figured out an inside joke that has been hiding in plain sight for years.”

Quite.

The Telegraph could have done better there tho’:

Ms Morris-Suzuki told the Chronicle of Higher Education, which first reported the story, that she took a dim view of quoting fictional characters and was left “wondering whether there might be other invented sources in Navarro’s work”.

She said she has not discovered any, but did find a quote in one book on China credited to Leslie LeBon, whose credentials are not listed in the book. An online search revealed that Ms LeBon is an architect – and also happens to be Ms Navarro’s wife.

Sigh.

What?

And do you really think piles of cash will stop that climate crisis? Really? How? Please tell, because 97%+ of the world’s climate scientists disagree with you. Are you one of them?

If piles of cash won’t stop climate change then why’s he sop insistent on spending everything everyone has to prevent climate change?

The Green New Deal is rather the argument that cash will solve the problem, isn’t it?

Err, why?

Jolyon Maugham is at it again, this time he wants to stop Britain leaving with a deal. He has just tweeted “I intend to lodge an immediate petition for an injunction in the Court of Session preventing the Government from placing the Withdrawal Agreement before Parliament for approval. We expect that petition to be lodged tomorrow and to be heard on Friday.”

Seems entirely fair

Barrie Masters was born in 1956 in Rochford, Essex, one of four children to Margaret, a hospital orderly, and Barry, a mechanic. He was educated at King Edmund secondary school and misspent his youth in boxing gyms and youth clubs around Southend and Canvey Island. “It was as boring as Belgium. It was dreadful. That’s why we started a band,” he later said.

Presumably that explains Dr. Feelgood as well.

The tedium of what came to be known as “the Essex badlands” persuaded several others to do the same and the area produced a statistically improbable number of successful 1970s groups, including Dr Feelgood and the Kursaal Flyers.

Err, yes, it does.

The line-up also briefly included the harmonica player Lew Lewis, who received a seven-year sentence for armed robbery after holding up a post office with a fake pistol and attempting to make his escape on a bicycle.

Sigh

Millions more people in Britain are without a job than shown by official unemployment figures, according to a study that suggests the jobless rate should be almost three times higher.

According to research from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the Centre for Cities thinktank, large levels of “hidden” unemployment in towns and cities across Britain are excluded from the official government statistics.

The study found that more than 3 million people are missing from the headline unemployment rate because they report themselves as economically inactive to government labour force surveys, saying that they believe no jobs are available.

No.

Unemployment is not having a job and desiring one sufficiently to go look for one.

Not economically active is not desiring a job sufficiently to go look for one.

We collect figures on this:

And:

Claiming that people without a job are unemployed is wrong. Because our definition insists that they must desire one sufficiently to be looking for one.

Worth noting two other things here. Even if we accept that definition being used, it’s still true that the level of such unemployment is the lowest it’s ever been. Because that employment to population ratio is higher than since we started measuring it.

That is, we’re getting the labour market right even by this critique.

Oh, and from the report:

While the UK has one of the lowest levels of economic inactivity across the OECD

We’re getting the labour market right even by the standards of this report……

These people are cretins

Environmental groups have warned the banks linked to Saudi Aramco’s planned market float that they risk financing the destruction of the planet by supporting the public listing of the world’s biggest oil producer.

The eight green groups, including Oil Change International and Friends of the Earth, warned that the world’s largest IPO would be “the biggest single infusion of capital into the fossil fuel industry” since global governments signed the Paris climate accord in 2015.

There is to be no infusion into the fossil fuel business. The Saudi state is to sell some portion of the company it owns, Aramco. Not, Aramco is to sell new shares in Aramaco.

This puts no more investment into fossil fuels than Legal and General divesting itself of BP shares by selling them does.

Actually, if the Saudis sold all of Aramco that would be them divesting from fossil fuels and you’d have to praise them then, wouldn’t you?

Depends upon what you think religion is really

My husband and I rock up every Sunday to church. Sure, we are barred from preaching, we are excluded from all meaningful leadership positions, and I have lost count of the number of times we have been made to feel deeply ashamed of our very presence. But this week we, along with our strongest allies, have finally been asked to leave, and by none other than our own archbishop, Glenn Davies. Why? Because we are those who have found deep beauty in the blessing of gay and lesbian marriages and we long for others to share in this joy.

From his address, it’s hard to discern whether he is ousting individuals or those dioceses that have made moves to bless same-sex marriage, but ultimately there is no difference – if an entire region is blacklisted for pursuing something we hold dear, what message does that send me? Needless to say, his words have a deep impact, and I am, all things considered, exhausted.

If you think religion is something to make you feel good, perhaps to foster that community feeling, then sure you can be pissed that there’s no support for gay marriage. The answer is also obvious, go found your own community that fosters that inclusive feeling you desire.

If you think that religion is in fact the revealed word of God then you’re pretty much stuck. Because if God says “Nope” then you’re pretty stuck, aren’t you?

Which gives us the third possibility, you agree that it’s The Word but that it is being misinterpreted by those currently doing the preaching.

OK, that means off you go and preach the correct Word.

Err, yes, without the cathedrals and churches and all built by those who believe as you don’t. But then to be as the lilies of the field is to be rather religious, isn’t it?

Owen Jones’ weird definition of investment

First, why politics is a lousy way of running things:

Labour MPs who vote for a Johnson Brexit deal should lose the whip
Owen Jones

Whether or not to Brexit is now a party political issue. To be determined by which political party wins on it. Not by the merits – or demerits – of the policy itself.

Which is why politics is a crappy way to run things. Decisions will be made by which political party benefits rather than the actual merits of the underlying proposition.

But then there’s this:

(Even New Labour, which struck an accommodation with Thatcherism, invested in public services, the minimum wage and tax credits to improve the lot of millions of working-class people.)

Tax credits are not an investment, they’re current spending. There is also no return from them.

And the minimum wage? Forcing other people to spend more of their money as you desire isn’t investment, is it? Ad theft normally isn’t…..