We Musn\’t Discriminate Now, Must We?

A report from the education front lines:

The report, Able Pupils Who Lose Momentum, found shortcomings in the 37 primaries across England visited by Government advisers.

One of the key problems uncovered by researchers was the failure to put children into ability sets or groups. Even when children were put in classes with children of similar abilities, clever children were still grouped with other "lower ability" pupils when carrying out work.

"Children often worked exclusively in mixed-ability groups and rarely worked with children who were making similar rates of progress," the report said.

Still insistent that children are a tabula rasa, that there are no innate differences in ability. Can we please, sometime soon, get back to the idea that all children should indeed be taught to the limits of their ability, but that ability varies?

4 comments on “We Musn\’t Discriminate Now, Must We?

  1. Clever children are grouped with lower ability pupils, in the hope that some of their intelligence and middle-class work habits will rub off. The government are using them to compensate for their intellectually bankrupt, ideologically driven educational policy, while simultaneously castigating their evil, middle-class parents.

  2. “Clever children are grouped with lower ability pupils…”

    But not the children (clever or low ability) of leading Government and party members, naturally. They don’t attend state schools…

  3. “Clever children are grouped with lower ability pupils, in the hope that some of their intelligence and middle-class work habits will rub off.”

    Eva, I don’t reckon it is as simple as that. The children are cross grouped to remove differentials in achievement and outcomes. That may happen by raising the standards of the weaker pupils, or holding back the high achievers. Just so long as they all end up looking the same, and giving rise to no inconvenient comparisons.

  4. Pingback: Lost momentum at Joanne Jacobs

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